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  • Author or Editor: Robert H. Rosenwasser x
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Badih Daou, Nohra Chalouhi, Robert M. Starke, Guilherme Barros, Lina Ya'qoub, John Do, Stavropoula Tjoumakaris, Robert H. Rosenwasser and Pascal Jabbour

OBJECTIVE

With the increasing number of aneurysms treated with endovascular coiling, more recurrences are being encountered. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of microsurgical clipping in the treatment of recurrent, previously coiled cerebral aneurysms and to identify risk factors that can affect the outcomes of this procedure.

METHODS

One hundred eleven patients with recurrent aneurysms whose lesions were managed by surgical clipping between January 2002 and October 2014 were identified. The rates of aneurysm occlusion, retreatment, complications, and good clinical outcome were retrospectively determined. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were performed to identify factors associated with these outcomes.

RESULTS

The mean patient age was 50.5 years, the mean aneurysm size was 7 mm, and 97.3% of aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation. The mean follow-up was 22 months. Complete aneurysm occlusion, as assessed by intraoperative angiography, was achieved in 97.3% of aneurysms (108 of 111 patients). Among patients, 1.8% (2 of 111 patients) had a recurrence after clipping. Retreatment was required in 4.5% of patients (5 of 111) after clipping. Major complications were observed in 8% of patients and mortality in 2.7%. Ninety percent of patients had a good clinical outcome. Aneurysm size (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.08–1.7; p = 0.009) and location in the posterior circulation were significantly associated with higher complications. All 3 patients who had coil extraction experienced a postoperative stroke. Aneurysm size (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.02–1.45; p = 0.025) and higher number of interventions prior to clipping (OR 5.3, 95% CI 1.3–21.4; p = 0.019) were significant predictors of poor outcome. An aneurysm size > 7 mm was a significant predictor of incomplete obliteration and retreatment (p = 0.018).

CONCLUSIONS

Surgical clipping is safe and effective in treating recurrent, previously coiled cerebral aneurysms. Aneurysm size, location, and number of previous coiling procedures are important factors to consider in the management of these aneurysms.

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Nikolaos Mouchtouris, Michael J. Lang, Kaitlyn Barkley, Guilherme Barros, Justin Turpin, Ahmad Sweid, Robert M. Starke, Nohra Chalouhi, Pascal Jabbour, Robert H. Rosenwasser and Stavropoula Tjoumakaris

OBJECTIVE

The authors sought to determine the predictors of late neurological and hospital-acquired medical complications (HACs) in patients with low-grade aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH).

METHODS

The authors conducted a retrospective study of 424 patients with low-grade aSAH admitted to their institution from 2008 to 2015. Data collected included patient comorbidities, Hunt and Hess (HH) grade, ICU length of stay (LOS), and complications. A logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the predictors for neurological and hospital-associated complications.

RESULTS

Out of 424 patients, 50 (11.8%) developed neurological complications after the first week, with a mean ICU stay of 16.3 ± 6.5 days. Of the remaining 374 patients without late neurological complications, 83 (22.2%) developed late HACs with a mean LOS of 15.1 ± 7.6 days, while those without medical complications stayed 11.8 ± 6.2 days (p = 0.001). Of the 83 patients, 55 (66.3%) did not have any HACs in the first week. Smoking (p = 0.062), history of cardiac disease (p = 0.043), HH grade III (p = 0.012), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) (p = 0.012), external ventricular drain (EVD) placement (p = 0.002), and early pneumonia/urinary tract infection (UTI)/deep vein thrombosis (DVT) (p = 0.001) were independently associated with late HACs. Logistic regression showed early pneumonia/UTI/DVT (p = 0.026) and increased HH grade (p = 0.057) to be significant risk factors for late medical complications.

CONCLUSIONS

While an extended ICU admission allows closer monitoring, low-grade aSAH patients develop HACs despite being at low risk for neurological complications. The characteristics of low-grade aSAH patients who would benefit from early discharge are reported in detail.

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Nikolaos Mouchtouris, Fadi Al Saiegh, Evan Fitchett, Carrie E. Andrews, Michael J. Lang, Ritam Ghosh, Richard F. Schmidt, Nohra Chalouhi, Guilherme Barros, Hekmat Zarzour, Victor Romo, Nabeel Herial, Pascal Jabbour, Stavropoula I. Tjoumakaris, Robert H. Rosenwasser and M. Reid Gooch

OBJECTIVE

The advent of mechanical thrombectomy (MT) has become an effective option for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke in addition to tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). With recent advances in device technology, MT has significantly altered the hospital course and functional outcomes of stroke patients. The authors’ goal was to establish the most up-to-date reperfusion and functional outcomes with the evolution of MT technology.

METHODS

The authors conducted a retrospective study of 403 patients who underwent MT for ischemic stroke at their institution from 2010 to 2017. They collected data on patient comorbidities, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score on arrival, tPA administration, revascularization outcomes, and functional outcomes on discharge.

RESULTS

In 403 patients, the mean NIHSS score on presentation was 15.8 ± 6.6, with 195 (48.0%) of patients receiving tPA prior to MT. Successful reperfusion (thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score 2B or 3) was achieved in 84.4%. Hemorrhagic conversion with significant mass effect was noted in 9.9% of patients. The median lengths of ICU and hospital stay were 3.0 and 7.0 days, respectively. Functional independence (modified Rankin Scale score 0–2) was noted in 125 (31.0%) patients, while inpatient mortality occurred in 43 (10.7%) patients.

CONCLUSIONS

As MT has established acute ischemic stroke as a neurosurgical disease, there is a pressing need to understand the hospital course, hospital- and procedure-related complications, and outcomes for this new patient population. The authors provide a detailed account of key metrics for MT with the latest device technology and identify the predictors of unfavorable outcomes and inpatient mortality.