Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Jeffrey Hatef x
  • By Author: Babu, Ranjith x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Ranjith Babu, Richa Sharma, Jacob H. Bagley, Jeffrey Hatef, Allan H. Friedman and Cory Adamson

Object

There are a variety of treatment options for the management of vestibular schwannomas (VSs), including microsurgical resection, radiotherapy, and observation. Although the choice of treatment is dependent on various patient factors, physician bias has been shown to significantly affect treatment choice for VS. In this study the authors describe the current epidemiology of VS and treatment trends in the US in the modern era. They also illustrate patient and tumor characteristics and elucidate their effect on tumor management.

Methods

Patients diagnosed with VS were identified through the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database, spanning the years 2004–2009. Age-adjusted incidence rates were calculated and adjusted using the 2000 US standard population. The chi-square and Student t-tests were used to evaluate differences between patient and tumor characteristics. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine the effects of various patient and tumor characteristics on the choice of tumor treatment.

Results

A total of 6225 patients with VSs treated between 2004 and 2009 were identified. The overall incidence rate was 1.2 per 100,000 population per year. The median age of patients with VS was 55 years, with the majority of patients being Caucasian (83.16%). Of all patients, 3053 (49.04%) received surgery only, with 1466 (23.55%) receiving radiotherapy alone. Both surgery and radiation were only used in 123 patients (1.98%), with 1504 patients not undergoing any treatment (24.16%). Increasing age correlated with decreased use of surgery (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.95–0.96; p < 0.0001), whereas increasing tumor size was associated with the increased use of surgery (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.04–1.05; p < 0.0001). Older age was associated with an increased likelihood of conservative management (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.04–1.05; p < 0.0001). Racial disparities were also seen, with African American patients being significantly less likely to receive surgical treatment compared with Caucasians (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.35–0.70; p < 0.0001), despite having larger tumors at diagnosis.

Conclusions

The incidence of vestibular schwannomas in the US is 1.2 per 100,000 population per year. Although many studies have demonstrated improved outcomes with the use of radiotherapy for small- to medium-sized VSs, surgery is still the most commonly used treatment modality for these tumors. Racial disparities also exist in the treatment of VSs, with African American patients being half as likely to receive surgery and nearly twice as likely to have their VSs managed conservatively despite presenting with larger tumors. Further studies are needed to elucidate the reasons for treatment disparities and investigate the nationwide trend of resection for the treatment of small VSs.

Restricted access

Ranjith Babu, Jeffrey Hatef, Roger E. McLendon, Thomas J. Cummings, John H. Sampson, Allan H. Friedman and Cory Adamson

Object

Rhabdoid glioblastoma (GB) is an exceedingly rare tumor in which some of the tumor cells possess rhabdoid features such as eccentric nuclei, abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm, and pseudopapillary formations. These tumors are exceptionally aggressive, and leptomeningeal dissemination is common. In the 9 previously reported cases, the longest survival was only 9 months, with a median survival of 17.8 weeks. The authors report the clinicopathological characteristics of 4 cases of rhabdoid GB and demonstrate the utility of intensive temozolomide and adjuvant therapy in these tumors. The authors also review the literature to provide the most comprehensive understanding of these rare tumors to date.

Methods

A retrospective review was performed of patients treated for GB at the Duke University Medical Center between 2004 and 2012. One of two experienced neuropathologists identified 4 cases as being rhabdoid GBs. Immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses were performed in all cases. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess overall survival, with the log-rank test being used to evaluate differences between survival curves. An extensive review of the literature was also performed.

Results

The median age of patients with rhabdoid GB was 30 years. Clinical presentation varied with location, with headache being a presenting symptom in 90% of patients. All lesions were supratentorial, and 45.5% of the cases involved the temporal lobe. Leptomeningeal dissemination occurred in 63.6% of patients, with 1 patient having extracranial metastasis to the scalp and lungs. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed epidermal growth factor receptor gain or amplification in all study cases. The median survival in the authors' cohort was significantly higher than that of all previously reported cases (27.5 vs 4.5 months, p = 0.003). Postoperative treatment in the authors' cohort included radiotherapy with concurrent temozolomide, bevacizumab, interleukin 13, CCNU, and/or etoposide.

Conclusions

Enhanced survival in the authors' 4 patients suggests that the current standard of care for the treatment of GB may be beneficial in rhabdoid GB cases, with postoperative radiotherapy and concomitant temozolomide treatment followed by adjuvant therapy. Due to the rapid tumor dissemination associated with these lesions, aggressive and timely therapy is warranted, with frequent surveillance and/or continued therapy despite stable disease. Additionally, patients should undergo full craniospinal imaging to monitor the development of distant metastatic disease.