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Ian McCarthy, Michael O'Brien, Christopher Ames, Chessie Robinson, Thomas Errico, David W. Polly Jr. and Richard Hostin

B ased on the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, the total number of adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgeries more than doubled over the past decade, from 9400 in 2000 to more than 20,600 in 2010 ( http://hcupus.ahrq.gov/nisoverview.jsp ). This compares to just a 20% increase in the frequency of all other spine primary diagnosis codes over the same time period (from 675,500 in 2000 to 813,800 in 2010; http://hcup-us.ahrq.gov/nisoverview.jsp ). Adult spinal deformity surgery is likely to increase in frequency with as much as 32% of the adult population suffering

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Alex Soroceanu, Douglas C. Burton, Bassel Georges Diebo, Justin S. Smith, Richard Hostin, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Oheneba Boachie-Adjei, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., Christopher Ames, Thomas J. Errico, Shay Bess, Munish C. Gupta, Robert A. Hart, Frank J. Schwab, Virginie Lafage and International Spine Study Group

number is expected to increase. Adult spinal deformity (ASD) is common, and its incidence increases with age. The prevalence of ASD in the elderly population has been investigated, with Schwab et al. 56 reporting rates of ASD up to 68% in patients over the age of 65 years. Regarding ASD treatment, multiple reports have documented the superiority of surgical intervention and its potential ability to improve pain and disability, the 2 primary presenting complaints of patients with ASD. 5 , 23 , 61 , 62 However, several authors have identified high complication

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Blake N. Staub, Renaud Lafage, Han Jo Kim, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., Richard Hostin, Douglas Burton, Lawrence Lenke, Munish C. Gupta, Christopher Ames, Eric Klineberg, Shay Bess, Frank Schwab, Virginie Lafage and the International Spine Study Group

data is based on 2 separate databases: a multicenter database of surgical adult spinal deformity (ASD) patients collected through the International Spine Study Group (ISSG) and an adult spine normative database that was used as a control. Inclusion criteria for the ISSG database included patients older than 18 years who underwent surgical intervention for documented thoracolumbar spinal deformity based on at least one of the following measures: coronal Cobb angle > 20°, sagittal vertical axis (SVA) > 5 cm, PT > 25°, or TK > 60°. In addition, cervical spine data

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Renaud Lafage, Ibrahim Obeid, Barthelemy Liabaud, Shay Bess, Douglas Burton, Justin S. Smith, Cyrus Jalai, Richard Hostin, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Christopher Ames, Han Jo Kim, Eric Klineberg, Frank Schwab, Virginie Lafage and the International Spine Study Group

A dult spinal deformity (ASD) is an increasingly recognized source of pain and disability in our aging population. Increased ASD severity, characterized by a flattening of lumbar lordosis (LL) 1 as well as an anterior trunk inclination, 23 corresponds to worsened patient-reported health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) scores. 9 , 23 When the severity of ASD starts to negatively impact patients’ lives and livelihoods, symptomatic and definitive treatment should be identified and pursued. Fortunately, the majority of symptomatic ASD patients can be sufficiently

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Alexander A. Theologis, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., Stacie Nguyen, David O. Okonkwo, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Justin S. Smith, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Richard Fessler, Shay Bess, Frank Schwab, Bassel G. Diebo, Douglas Burton, Robert Hart, Vedat Deviren and Christopher Ames

L umbar /thoracolumbar scoliosis is a common feature of adult spinal deformity (ASD) and is frequently accompanied by global spinal malalignment, back and leg pain, and decreased quality of life. Operative intervention for ASD has proven cost effective compared with nonoperative management, 25 as many patients have persistent pain and curve progression with nonoperative treatment. 27 , 29 , 37 Keys to achieving good postoperative outcomes include correction of scoliosis, decompression of neural elements, avoidance of pseudarthrosis, and restoration

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Ferran Pellisé, Miquel Serra-Burriel, Justin S. Smith, Sleiman Haddad, Michael P. Kelly, Alba Vila-Casademunt, Francisco Javier Sánchez Pérez-Grueso, Shay Bess, Jeffrey L. Gum, Douglas C. Burton, Emre Acaroğlu, Frank Kleinstück, Virginie Lafage, Ibrahim Obeid, Frank Schwab, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Ahmet Alanay, Christopher Ames, the International Spine Study Group and the European Spine Study Group

A dult spinal deformity (ASD) can be a debilitating disease. Recent studies have shown that the burden of ASD in patients seeking specialized medical attention is substantial compared to that of other severe chronic conditions (i.e., diabetes, congestive heart failure, chronic lung disease, or arthritis). 3 , 26 Nonoperative care has not shown a significant impact on health-related quality of life (HRQOL), 5 , 9 while surgery is associated with HRQOL improvements 17 that are maintained over time. 18 , 30 Aging populations, the high prevalence of ASD, and an

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Kristina Bianco, Robert Norton, Frank Schwab, Justin S. Smith, Eric Klineberg, Ibrahim Obeid, Gregory Mundis Jr., Christopher I. Shaffrey, Khaled Kebaish, Richard Hostin, Robert Hart, Munish C. Gupta, Douglas Burton, Christopher Ames, Oheneba Boachie-Adjei, Themistocles S. Protopsaltis and Virginie Lafage

S urgery for adult spinal deformity (ASD) is a challenging undertaking with significant complexity and technical demand. The surgical treatment of fixed sagittal and/or coronal plane deformities typically involves multilevel arthrodesis with one or more osteotomies for the restoration of global spinopelvic alignment. Three-column resection osteotomies (3COs) are powerful techniques allowing for simultaneous multiplanar deformity correction from a single posterior surgical approach. 21 These techniques involve Grade 3–5 resections and encompass pedicle

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spinal deformity (ASD) remains a challenge for the spinal surgeon. While minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has many favorable attributes that would be of great benefit for the ASD population, improvements in lordosis and sagittal balance have remained elusive using MIS an approach. This report describes the evolution of an MIS method for treating ASD with attention to sagittal correction. Methods: Over an 18 month period 25 patients with thoracolumbar scoliosis were treated surgically. The mean patient age was 72 years, with 68% females. Patients were treated with

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Association of Neurological Surgeons 2013.4.FOC-LSRSABSTRACTS Oral Presentation Abstracts Paper 47. Age, Sagittal Deformity and Operative Correction are Risk Factors for Proximal Junctional Failure (PJF) Following Adult Spinal Deformity (ASD) Surgery Robert Hart , MD , Richard Hostin , MD , Themistocles Protopsaltis , MD , Shay Bess , MD , Frank Schwab , MD , Virginie Lafage , PhD; , Praveen Mummaneni , MD , Christopher Ames , MD , Christopher Shaffrey , MD , Justin

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systematically distribute any published materials without written permission from JNSPG. 2017 Background/Introduction: Adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery is a massive undertaking that may involve a significant amount of blood loss, especially when various osteotomy techniques are utilized. Antifibrinolytic agents such as tranexamic acid (TXA) have been used in an attempt to reduce intraoperative blood loss. However, there is no universally accepted dosing protocol for TXA in spine surgery. Moreover, there are very few reports in the literature regarding high