Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Alan S. Boulos x
  • By Author: Adamo, Matthew A. x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Eric M. Deshaies, Matthew A. Adamo and Alan S. Boulos

Object

The HydroCoil embolization system is a helical platinum coil coated with a polymeric hydrogel that expands when it contacts aqueous solutions to increase filling volumes, improve mesh stability, and possibly elicit a healing response within the aneurysm. In this paper, the authors report the 1-year recurrence and complication rates of 67 aneurysms embolized with the HydroCoil system.

Methods

Sixty-four consecutive patients (67 total aneurysms) with small (≤ 7 mm), large (8–15 mm), very large (16–24 mm), and giant (≥ 25 mm) aneurysms in the anterior and posterior intracranial circulations were treated with HydroCoils between March 2003 and September 2004. All aneurysms were embolized by the senior author (A.S.B) with HydroCoils alone or in combination with bare platinum coils, until either there was no further angiographic contrast filling of the aneurysm or the microcatheter was pushed out of the dome by the coil mass. Balloon assistance was used in three cases and combined Neuroform stent–coil embolization in eight other cases. To evaluate the safety and 1-year efficacy of the HydroCoil system, periprocedural complications were recorded, and angiographic recurrences were categorized using the Raymond–Roy Occlusion Classification (RROC) system.

The 1-year aneurysm recurrence rate independent of size was 15% in patients treated with HydroCoils. Seventy percent of the patients had stable occlusions. The recurrence rate for small aneurysms was 3.7%, and the combined recurrence rate for small and large aneurysms was 6%. Fifteen percent of the aneurysms initially categorized as RROC Type 2 or 3 with stasis of contrast material at the time of initial embolization improved in RROC type, allowing the authors to develop the aneurysm embolization grade to predict recurrence. The neurological complication rate was 14.9%, of which 4.5% represented permanent neurological deficits.

Conclusions

The HydroCoil embolization system is safe and provides excellent 1-year occlusion of small and large aneurysms with initial RROC Type 1, as well as those with RROC Types 2 and 3 with stasis of contrast material at the time of embolization. Very large and giant aneurysms were not as successfully occluded with this system. Treatment of large and giant internal carotid artery aneurysms was more likely to result in cranial nerve palsies and postembolization headaches than treatment in other locations. The aneurysm embolization grade the authors developed using the results of this study accurately predicted 1-year recurrence rates based on the immediate postembolization angiographic characteristics of the treated aneurysm.

Restricted access

John C. Dalfino, Matthew A. Adamo, Ravi H. Gandhi, Alan S. Boulos and John B. Waldman

Object

The optimal management of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt in the setting of acute, non–shunt related abdominal and pelvic infections is unknown. In the literature, distal shunt catheter reimplantation with or without a variable period of externalization has been recommended to prevent ascending ventriculitis. While this strategy is effective, there is little to almost no published data suggesting that it is necessary in all cases. Furthermore, it is not clear that shunt externalization to an external drainage bag during the treatment of non–shunt related peritonitis is any less likely to lead to ventriculitis than leaving the catheter in place. In the authors' experience, shunt externalization or revision during an episode of acute, non–shunt related peritonitis is unnecessary to prevent ventriculitis or chronic peritonitis.

Methods

In the present case series, the authors report on 7 patients whose shunts were left in the abdomen while they were treated for acute peritonitis. The patients were followed clinically for up to 21 months after the diagnosis to assess for evidence of recurrent abdominal infections, shunt infections, or shunt failure.

Results

In a follow-up period ranging from 13 to 22 months, no patient developed ventriculitis, required a shunt revision, or was unable to clear the peritoneal infection.

Conclusions

The results of this small series suggest that leaving the distal end of a shunt catheter in place in a patient with acute peritonitis is a reasonably safe choice in specific patients, provided the source of infection is aggressively treated with systemic antibiotics and local debridement when necessary.

Restricted access

Tyler J. Kenning, Eric M. Deshaies, Matthew A. Adamo, John B. Waldman and Alan S. Boulos

Identifying a source of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) or intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in patients with negative results on cranial angiographic imaging can be a diagnostic challenge. The authors present the case of a 14-month-old girl who presented with lethargy and spontaneous SAH and IVH, and later became acutely paraplegic. Except for the SAH and IVH, findings on neuroimages of the brain were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intramedullary thoracolumbar spinal cord hemorrhage that was found to be associated with arterialized veins intraoperatively. Catheter-based diagnostic angiography identified a spinal perimedullary macroarteriovenous fistula (macro-AVF) that was completely embolized with Onyx, negating the need for further surgical intervention. The authors believe this to be the first reported case of a thoracolumbar perimedullary macro-AVF presenting with SAH and IVH. In addition, descriptions of Onyx embolization of a spinal AVF in the literature are rare, especially in pediatric patients.