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Jason P. Sheehan, Gregory Patterson, David Schlesinger, and Zhiyuan Xu

Object

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a challenging psychiatric condition associated with anxiety and ritualistic behaviors. Although medical management and psychiatric therapy are effective for many patients, severe and extreme cases may prove refractory to these approaches. The authors evaluated their experience with Gamma Knife (GK) capsulotomy in treating patients with severe OCD.

Methods

A retrospective review of an institutional review board–approved prospective clinical GK database was conducted for patients treated for severe OCD. All patients were evaluated preoperatively by at least one psychiatrist, and their condition was deemed refractory to pharmacological and psychiatric therapy.

Results

Five patients were identified. Gamma Knife surgery with the GK Perfexion unit was used to target the anterior limb of the internal capsule bilaterally. A single 4-mm isocenter was used; maximum radiation doses of 140–160 Gy were delivered. All 5 patients were preoperatively and postoperatively assessed for clinical response by using both subjective and objective metrics, including the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (YBOCS); 4 of the 5 patients had postoperative radiological follow-up. The median clinical follow-up was 24 months (range 6–33 months). At the time of radiosurgery, all patients had YBOCS scores in the severe or extreme range (median 32, range 31–34). At the last follow-up, 4 (80%) of the 5 patients showed marked clinical improvement; in the remaining patient (20%), mild improvement was seen. The median YBOCS score was 13 (range 12–31) at the last follow-up. Neuroimaging studies at 6 months after GK treatment demonstrated a small area of enhancement corresponding to the site of the isocenter and some mild T2 signal changes in the internal capsule. No adverse clinical effects were noted from the radiosurgery.

Conclusions

For patients with severe OCD refractory to medications and psychiatric therapy, GK capsulotomy afforded clinical improvement. Further study of this approach seems warranted.

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Jason P. Sheehan, Zhiyuan Xu, Britney Popp, Leigh Kowalski, and David Schlesinger

Object

The survival of patients with high-grade gliomas remains unfavorable. Mibefradil, a T-type calcium channel inhibitor capable of synchronizing dividing cells at the G1 phase, has demonstrated potential benefit in conjunction with chemotherapeutic agents for gliomas in in vitro studies. In vivo study of mibefradil and radiosurgery is lacking. The authors used an intracranial C6 glioma model in rats to study tumor response to mibefradil and radiosurgery.

Methods

Two weeks after implantation of C6 cells into the animals, each rat underwent MRI every 2 weeks thereafter for 8 weeks. After tumor was confirmed on MRI, the rats were randomly assigned to one of the experimental groups. Tumor volumes were measured on MR images. Experimental Group 1 received 30 mg/kg of mibefradil intraperitoneally 3 times a day for 1 week starting on postoperative day (POD) 15; Group 2 received 8 Gy of cranial radiation via radiosurgery delivered on POD 15; Group 3 underwent radiosurgery on POD 15, followed by 1 week of mibefradil; and Group 4 received mibefradil on POD 15 for 1 week, followed by radiosurgery sometime from POD 15 to POD 22. Twenty-seven glioma-bearing rats were analyzed. Survival was compared between groups using Kaplan-Meier methodology.

Results

Median survival in Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 was 35, 31, 43, and 52 days, respectively (p = 0.036, log-rank test). Two animals in Group 4 survived to POD 60, which is twice the expected survival of untreated animals in this model. Analysis of variance and a post hoc test indicated no tumor volume differences on PODs 15 and 29. However, significant volume differences were found on POD 43; mean tumor volumes for Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 250, 266, 167, and 34 mm3, respectively (p = 0.046, ANOVA). A Cox proportional hazards regression test showed survival was associated with tumor volume on POD 29 (p = 0.001) rather than on POD 15 (p = 0.162). In vitro assays demonstrated an appreciable and dose-dependent increase in apoptosis between 2- and 7-μM concentrations of mibefradil.

Conclusions

Mibefradil response is schedule dependent and enhances survival and reduces glioblastoma when combined with ionizing radiation.

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Sheng-Tzung Tsai, Hsin-Chi Tsai, Chung-Chih Kuo, Hsiang-Yi Hung, Chien-Hui Lee, and Shin-Yuan Chen

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Zhiyuan Xu, David Schlesinger, Krisztina Moldovan, Colin Przybylowski, Xingwen Sun, Cheng-Chia Lee, Chun-Po Yen, and Jason Sheehan

Object

The authors evaluate the impact of target location on the rate of pain relief (PR) in patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia (TN) undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS).

Methods

The authors conducted a retrospective review of 99 patients with idiopathic TN who were identified from a prospectively maintained database and were treated with SRS targeting the dorsal root entry zone with a maximum dose of 80 Gy. Targeting of the more proximal portion of a trigeminal nerve with the 50% isodose line overlapping the brainstem was performed in 36 patients (proximal group). In a matched group, 63 patients received SRS targeting the 20% isodose line tangential to the emergence of the brainstem (distal group). The median follow-up time was 33 months (range 6–124 months).

Results

The actuarial rate of maintenance of Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) Pain Score I–IIIa was attained in 89% of patients at 1 year, 81% at 2 years, and 69% at 4 years, respectively, after SRS. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that durability of PR was only associated with the proximal location of the radiosurgical target (log-rank test, p = 0.018). Radiosurgery-induced facial numbness (BNI Score II or III) developed in 35 patients, which was significantly more frequent in the proximal group (19 patients [53%] compared with 16 [25%] in the distal group [p = 0.015]).

Conclusions

The radiosurgical target appears to affect the duration of pain relief in patients with idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia with the target closer to the brainstem affording extended pain relief. However, the proximal SRS target was also associated with an increased risk of mild to moderate facial numbness.