Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for

  • Author or Editor: Michael T. Lawton x
  • Refine by Access: all x
  • By Author: Sanai, Nader x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Zaman Mirzadeh, Nader Sanai, and Michael T. Lawton

The authors introduce the azygos anterior cerebral artery (ACA) bypass as an option for revascularizing distal ACA territories, as part of a strategy to trap giant anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysms. In this procedure, the aneurysm is exposed with an orbitozygomatic-pterional craniotomy and distal ACA vessels are exposed with a bifrontal craniotomy. The uninvolved contralateral A2 segment of the ACA serves as a donor vessel for a short radial artery graft. The contralateral pericallosal artery (PcaA) and the callosomarginal artery (CmaA) are connected to the graft in the interhemispheric fissure using the double reimplantation technique. Three anastomoses create an azygos system supplying the entire ACA territory, enabling the surgeon to trap the aneurysm incompletely. Retrograde flow from the CmaA supplies the ipsilateral recurrent artery of Heubner, and the aneurysm lumen thromboses.

The azygos bypass was successfully performed to treat a 47-year-old woman with a giant, thrombotic ACoA aneurysm supplied by the A1 segment of the left ACA, with left PcaA and CmaA originating from the aneurysm base.

The authors conclude that the azygos ACA bypass is a novel option for revascularizing PcaA and CmaA, as part of the overall treatment of giant ACoA aneurysms.

Restricted access

Enrique C. G. Ventureyra

Restricted access

Nader Sanai, Heather Fullerton, Tom R. Karl, and Michael T. Lawton

✓ Large-vessel vasculitis syndromes in the pediatric population are rare and highly morbid. The authors here report on the microsurgical revascularization of a unique case of presumed vasculitis with aortitis and severe obliterative arteriopathy in a 10-month-old child with symptomatic hemispheric hypoperfusion. Using a cryopreserved saphenous vein, this unilateral aortocarotid bypass restored normal intracranial perfusion bilaterally and led to a resolution of the patient's ischemic symptoms. The aortocarotid bypass is clinically effective and technically feasible in young children when a saphenous vein allograft is used. The bypass graft is amenable to angioplasty with or without stenting if delayed stenosis becomes an issue later in life.

Restricted access

Ronit Agid and Karel Terbrugge

Restricted access

Nader Sanai, Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, Nalin M. Gupta, Victor Perry, Peter P. Sun, Charles B. Wilson, and Michael T. Lawton

Object

Longer life expectancies and differences in the underlying disease in children with aneurysms raise important issues concerning the choice of microsurgical or endovascular therapy. The authors reviewed their experience at one institution regarding patients treated between 1977 and 2003, focusing on the issue of treatment durability.

Methods

Forty-three aneurysms in 32 pediatric patients were identified. The patients ranged in age from 2 months to 18 years (mean 11.7 years). Only seven patients (22%) presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage, and in nine patients (28%) significant medical comorbidities were present. Aneurysm locations included the internal carotid artery (13 lesions), middle cerebral artery (11 lesions), and the basilar artery/vertebrobasilar junction (six lesions). Of the 43 lesions, 17 (40%) were giant aneurysms and 22 (51%) exhibited fusiform/dolichoectatic morphological features. Thirteen patients underwent microsurgery, 16 endovascular treatment, and three observation. Complete aneurysm obliteration rates were 94 and 82% in the microsurgical and endovascular groups, respectively. There were no deaths in either group, and neurological morbidity rates were comparable. Over time, 14% of endovascularly treated aneurysms recurred, and in 19% of these patients de novo aneurysms developed (mean follow-up duration 5.7 years). In contrast, there were no recurrences in the microsurgically treated aneurysms and only one de novo aneurysm (6%).

Conclusions

Both microsurgical and endovascular therapies can be conducted safely to treat pediatric aneurysms. Microsurgery may be more efficacious in completely eliminating the aneurysm and its effects more durable over the extended lifetime of these patients. Parental biases toward nonoperative therapy should be thoroughly addressed before ultimately selecting a treatment strategy.

Free access

Colin J. Przybylowski, Benjamin K. Hendricks, Fabio A. Frisoli, Xiaochun Zhao, Claudio Cavallo, Leandro Borba Moreira, Sirin Gandhi, Nader Sanai, Kaith K. Almefty, Michael T. Lawton, and Andrew S. Little

OBJECTIVE

Recently, the prognostic value of the Simpson resection grading scale has been called into question for modern meningioma surgery. In this study, the authors analyzed the relationship between Simpson resection grade and meningioma recurrence in their institutional experience.

METHODS

This study is a retrospective review of all patients who underwent resection of a WHO grade I intracranial meningioma at the authors’ institution from 2007 to 2017. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to assess for predictors of Simpson grade IV resection and postoperative neurological morbidity. Cox multivariate analysis was used to assess for predictors of tumor recurrence. Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank tests were used to assess and compare recurrence-free survival (RFS) of Simpson resection grades, respectively.

RESULTS

A total of 492 patients with evaluable data were included for analysis, including 394 women (80.1%) and 98 men (19.9%) with a mean (SD) age of 58.7 (12.8) years. The tumors were most commonly located at the skull base (n = 302; 61.4%) or the convexity/parasagittal region (n = 139; 28.3%). The median (IQR) tumor volume was 6.8 (14.3) cm3. Simpson grade I, II, III, or IV resection was achieved in 105 (21.3%), 155 (31.5%), 52 (10.6%), and 180 (36.6%) patients, respectively. Sixty-three of 180 patients (35.0%) with Simpson grade IV resection were treated with adjuvant radiosurgery. In the multivariate analysis, increasing largest tumor dimension (p < 0.01) and sinus invasion (p < 0.01) predicted Simpson grade IV resection, whereas skull base location predicted neurological morbidity (p = 0.02). Tumor recurrence occurred in 63 patients (12.8%) at a median (IQR) of 36 (40.3) months from surgery. Simpson grade I resection resulted in superior RFS compared with Simpson grade II resection (p = 0.02), Simpson grade III resection (p = 0.01), and Simpson grade IV resection with adjuvant radiosurgery (p = 0.01) or without adjuvant radiosurgery (p < 0.01). In the multivariate analysis, Simpson grade I resection was independently associated with no tumor recurrence (p = 0.04). Simpson grade II and III resections resulted in superior RFS compared with Simpson grade IV resection without adjuvant radiosurgery (p < 0.01) but similar RFS compared with Simpson grade IV resection with adjuvant radiosurgery (p = 0.82). Simpson grade IV resection with adjuvant radiosurgery resulted in superior RFS compared with Simpson grade IV resection without adjuvant radiosurgery (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

The Simpson resection grading scale continues to hold substantial prognostic value in the modern neurosurgical era. When feasible, Simpson grade I resection should remain the goal of intracranial meningioma surgery. Simpson grade IV resection with adjuvant radiosurgery resulted in similar RFS compared with Simpson grade II and III resections.

Free access

Colin J. Przybylowski, Benjamin K. Hendricks, Fabio A. Frisoli, Xiaochun Zhao, Claudio Cavallo, Leandro Borba Moreira, Sirin Gandhi, Nader Sanai, Kaith K. Almefty, Michael T. Lawton, and Andrew S. Little

OBJECTIVE

Recently, the prognostic value of the Simpson resection grading scale has been called into question for modern meningioma surgery. In this study, the authors analyzed the relationship between Simpson resection grade and meningioma recurrence in their institutional experience.

METHODS

This study is a retrospective review of all patients who underwent resection of a WHO grade I intracranial meningioma at the authors’ institution from 2007 to 2017. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to assess for predictors of Simpson grade IV resection and postoperative neurological morbidity. Cox multivariate analysis was used to assess for predictors of tumor recurrence. Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank tests were used to assess and compare recurrence-free survival (RFS) of Simpson resection grades, respectively.

RESULTS

A total of 492 patients with evaluable data were included for analysis, including 394 women (80.1%) and 98 men (19.9%) with a mean (SD) age of 58.7 (12.8) years. The tumors were most commonly located at the skull base (n = 302; 61.4%) or the convexity/parasagittal region (n = 139; 28.3%). The median (IQR) tumor volume was 6.8 (14.3) cm3. Simpson grade I, II, III, or IV resection was achieved in 105 (21.3%), 155 (31.5%), 52 (10.6%), and 180 (36.6%) patients, respectively. Sixty-three of 180 patients (35.0%) with Simpson grade IV resection were treated with adjuvant radiosurgery. In the multivariate analysis, increasing largest tumor dimension (p < 0.01) and sinus invasion (p < 0.01) predicted Simpson grade IV resection, whereas skull base location predicted neurological morbidity (p = 0.02). Tumor recurrence occurred in 63 patients (12.8%) at a median (IQR) of 36 (40.3) months from surgery. Simpson grade I resection resulted in superior RFS compared with Simpson grade II resection (p = 0.02), Simpson grade III resection (p = 0.01), and Simpson grade IV resection with adjuvant radiosurgery (p = 0.01) or without adjuvant radiosurgery (p < 0.01). In the multivariate analysis, Simpson grade I resection was independently associated with no tumor recurrence (p = 0.04). Simpson grade II and III resections resulted in superior RFS compared with Simpson grade IV resection without adjuvant radiosurgery (p < 0.01) but similar RFS compared with Simpson grade IV resection with adjuvant radiosurgery (p = 0.82). Simpson grade IV resection with adjuvant radiosurgery resulted in superior RFS compared with Simpson grade IV resection without adjuvant radiosurgery (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

The Simpson resection grading scale continues to hold substantial prognostic value in the modern neurosurgical era. When feasible, Simpson grade I resection should remain the goal of intracranial meningioma surgery. Simpson grade IV resection with adjuvant radiosurgery resulted in similar RFS compared with Simpson grade II and III resections.