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Seong-Hyun Park, Hideyuki Kano, Ajay Niranjan, John C. Flickinger, and L. Dade Lunsford

Object

To assess the long-term outcomes of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for cerebellopontine angle (CPA) meningiomas, the authors retrospectively reviewed data from a 20-year experience. They evaluated progression-free survival as well as improvement, stabilization, or deterioration in clinical symptoms.

Methods

Seventy-four patients with CPA meningiomas underwent SRS involving various Gamma Knife technologies between 1990 and 2010. The most common presenting symptoms were dizziness or disequilibrium, hearing loss, facial sensory dysfunction, and headache. The median tumor volume was 3.0 cm3 (range 0.3–17.1 cm3), and the median radiation dose to the tumor margin was 13 Gy (range 11–16 Gy). The median follow-up period was 40 months (range 4–147 months).

Results

At last imaging follow-up, the tumor volume had decreased in 46 patients (62%), remained stable in 26 patients (35%), and increased in 2 patients (3%). The progression-free survival after SRS was 98% at 1 year, 98% at 3 years, and 95% at 5 years. At the last clinical follow-up, 23 patients (31%) showed neurological improvement, 43 patients (58%) showed no change in symptoms or signs, and 8 patients (11%) had worsening symptoms or signs. The neurological improvement rate after SRS was 16% at 1 year, 31% at 3 years, and 40% at 5 years. The post-SRS deterioration rate was 5% at 1 year, 10% at 3 years, and 16% at 5 years. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that trigeminal neuralgia was the symptom most likely to worsen after SRS (HR 0.08, 95% CI 0.02–0.31; p = 0.001). Asymptomatic peritumoral edema occurred in 4 patients (5%) after SRS, and symptomatic adverse radiation effects developed in 7 patients (9%).

Conclusions

Stereotactic radiosurgery for CPA meningiomas provided a high tumor control rate and relatively low risk of ARE. Tumor compression of the trigeminal nerve by a CPA meningioma resulted in an increased rate of facial pain worsening in this patient experience.

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Hideyuki Kano, Ajay Niranjan, Douglas Kondziolka, John C. Flickinger, and L. Dade Lunsford

Object

To evaluate outcome predictors after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with trigeminal schwannomas, the authors compared tumor control, functional preservation, and complications with tumor grade, tumor volume, patient age, and tumor imaging characteristics.

Methods

The records of 33 consecutive patients with trigeminal schwannoma treated via Gamma Knife surgery were retrospectively reviewed. The median patient age was 49.5 years (range 15.1–82.5 years). Eleven patients had undergone prior tumor resection. Two patients had neurofibromatosis Type 2. Lesions were classified as root type (6 tumors), ganglion type (17 tumors), and dumbbell type (10 tumors) based on their location. The median radiosurgery target volume was 4.2 cm3 (range 0.5–18.0 cm3), and the median dose to the tumor margin was 15.0 Gy (range 12–20 Gy).

Results

At an average of 6 years (range 7.2–147.9 months), the rate of progression-free survival (PFS) at 1, 5, and 10 years after SRS was 97.0, 82.0, and 82.0%, respectively. Factors associated with improved PFS included female sex, smaller tumor volume, and a root or ganglion tumor type. Neurological symptoms or signs improved in 11 (33.3%) of 33 patients and were unchanged in 19 (57.6%). Three patients (9.1%) had symptomatic disease progression. Patients who had not undergone a prior tumor resection were significantly more likely to show improvement in neurological symptoms or signs.

Conclusions

Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective and minimally invasive management option in patients with residual or newly diagnosed trigeminal schwannomas. Predictors of a better treatment response included female sex, smaller tumor volume, root or ganglion tumor type, and the application of SRS as the primary treatment.

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Ajay Niranjan, Ahmed Kashkoush, Hideyuki Kano, Edward A. Monaco III, John C. Flickinger, and L. Dade Lunsford

OBJECTIVE

Seizures are the second-most common presenting symptom in patients with lobar arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, few studies have assessed the long-term effect of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) on seizure control. The authors of this study assess the outcome of SRS for these patients to identify prognostic factors associated with seizure control.

METHODS

Patients with AVM who presented with a history of seizure and underwent SRS at the authors’ institution between 1987 and 2012 were retrospectively assessed. The total cohort included 155 patients with a mean follow-up of 86 months (range 6–295 months). Primary outcomes assessed were seizure frequency, antiepileptic drug regimen, and seizure freedom for 6 months prior to last follow-up.

RESULTS

Seizure-free status was achieved in 108 patients (70%), with an additional 23 patients (15%) reporting improved seizure frequency as compared to their pre-SRS status. The median time to seizure-free status was estimated to be 12 months (95% CI 0–27 months) as evaluated via Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. The mean seizure frequency prior to SRS was 14.2 (95% CI 5.4–23.1) episodes per year. Although not all patients tried, the proportion of patients successfully weaned off all antiepileptic drugs was 18% (28/155 patients). On multivariate logistic regression, focal impaired awareness seizure type (also known as complex partial seizures) and superficial venous drainage were significantly associated with a decreased odds ratio for seizure-free status at last follow-up (OR 0.37 [95% CI 0.15–0.92] for focal impaired awareness seizures; OR 0.36 [95% CI 0.16–0.81] for superficial venous drainage). The effects of superficial venous drainage on seizure outcome were nonsignificant when excluding patients with < 2 years of follow-up. AVM obliteration did not correlate with long-term seizure freedom (p = 0.202, chi-square test).

CONCLUSIONS

This study suggests that SRS improves long-term seizure control and increases the likelihood of being medication free, independently of AVM obliteration. Patients with focal impaired awareness seizures were less likely to obtain long-term seizure relief.

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Stephen Johnson, Hideyuki Kano, Andrew Faramand, Ajay Niranjan, John C. Flickinger, and L. Dade Lunsford

OBJECTIVE

Optimizing outcomes in the management of patients with vestibular schwannomas (VSs) requires consideration of the patient’s goals. Earlier recognition of VS by imaging has led to an evolution in management. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has emerged as a frequently used strategy designed to reduce management risks, obtain long-term tumor control, and preserve current neurological function. The authors analyzed features that impact hearing preservation rates in patients with serviceable hearing prior to SRS.

METHODS

The study included 307 patients who had serviceable hearing (Gardner-Robertson hearing scale [GR] grade 1 or 2, speech discrimination score ≥ 50%, pure tone average ≤ 50 dB) at the time of SRS. The authors evaluated parameters that included age, tumor volume, hearing status, disequilibrium, tinnitus, Koos class, sex, and tumor margin dose. The Pittsburgh Hearing Prediction Score (PHPS) was evaluated as a method to predict long-term hearing outcomes in these cases.

RESULTS

At a median of 7.6 years after SRS (range 1–23 years), tumor control was achieved in 95% of patients. The overall serviceable hearing preservation rate was 77.8% at 3 years, 68.8% at 5 years, and 51.8% at 10 years. The PHPS assigns a total of 5 points based on patient age (1 point if < 45 years, 2 points if 45–59 years, and 3 points if ≥ 60 years), tumor volume (0 points if < 1.2 cm3, 1 point if ≥ 1.2 cm3), and GR grade (0 points if grade 1 hearing, 1 point if grade 2 hearing) The serviceable hearing preservation rate was 92.3% at 10 years in patients whose score total was 1. In contrast, none of the patients whose PHPS was 5 maintained serviceable hearing at 10 years (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

SRS resulted in a high rate of long-term tumor control and cranial nerve preservation. The PHPS helped to predict long-term hearing preservation rates in patients who underwent SRS when they still had serviceable hearing. The best long-term hearing preservation rates were found in younger patients with smaller tumor volumes.

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Hideyuki Kano, Ajay Niranjan, Aftab Khan, John C. Flickinger, Douglas Kondziolka, Frank Lieberman, and L. Dade Lunsford

Object

In this study the authors evaluated the role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the management of progressive or newly diagnosed small-volume oligodendrogliomas. Tumor control, survival, and complications were assessed in patients with oligodendroglioma who underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery as a primary or adjuvant procedure.

Methods

The authors retrospectively reviewed 30 patients with oligodendroglioma (12 Grade II and 18 Grade III) who underwent SRS between 1992 and June 2006 at the University of Pittsburgh. The median patient age was 43.2 years (range 10.8–75.4 years). Twenty-four patients had previously undergone resection of the tumor, whereas tumors in 6 were diagnosed based on biopsy findings. The SRS was performed in 25 patients who had imaging-defined tumor progression despite prior fractionated radiation (22 patients) and/or chemotherapy (20 patients). The median target volume was 15.4 cm3 (range 0.07–48.7 cm3) and the median margin dose was 14.5 Gy (range 11–20 Gy).

Results

At an average of 39.2 months of follow-up (range 12–133 months), 17 patients were dead and 13 were living. The overall survival rates from diagnosis to 5 and 10 years were 90.9 and 68.2%, respectively, for Grade II and 52.1% at 5 years and 26.1% at 10 years for Grade III. Factors associated with an improved progression-free survival included lower tumor grade and smaller tumor volume. In 13 patients who had loss of heterozygosity testing, patients with 1p19q loss of heterozygosity had a significantly improved survival after diagnosis (p = 0.04).

Conclusions

The SRS modality is a minimally invasive additional option for patients with residual or recurrent oligodendrogliomas. It may also be considered as an alternative to initial resection in small-volume tumors located in the cortical brain region.

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Ajay Niranjan, Hideyuki Kano, Aditya Iyer, Douglas Kondziolka, John C. Flickinger, and L. Dade Lunsford

OBJECT

After initial standard of care management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), relatively few proven options remain for patients with unresected progressive tumor. Numerous reports describe the value of radiosurgery, yet this modality appears to remain underutilized. The authors analyzed the outcomes of early adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for unresected tumor or later salvage SRS for progressive GBM. Radiosurgery was performed as part of the multimodality management and was combined with other therapies. Patients continued to receive additional chemotherapy after SRS and prior to progression being documented. In this retrospective analysis, the authors evaluated factors that affected patient overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival.

METHODS

Between 1987 and 2008 the authors performed Gamma Knife SRS in 297 patients with histologically proven GBMs. All patients had received prior fractionated radiation therapy, and 66% had undergone one or more chemotherapy regimens. Ninety-six patients with deep-seated unresectable GBMs underwent biopsy only. Of those in whom excision had been possible, resection was considered to be gross total in 68 and subtotal in 133. The median patient age was 58 years (range 23–89 years) and the median tumor volume was 14 cm3 (range 0.26–84.2 cm3). The median prescription dose delivered to the imaging-defined tumor margin was 15 Gy (range 9–25 Gy). The median follow-up duration was 8.6 months (range 1.1–173 months). Cox regression models were used to analyze survival outcomes. Variables examined included age, residual versus recurrent tumor, prior chemotherapy, time to first recurrence, SRS dose, and gross tumor volume.

RESULTS

The median survival times after radiosurgery and after diagnosis were 9.03 and 18.1 months, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year OS after SRS were 37.9% and 16.7%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year OS after diagnosis were 76.2% and 30.8%, respectively. Using multivariate analysis, factors associated with improved OS after diagnosis were younger age (< 60 years) at diagnosis (p < 0.0001), tumor volume < 14 cm3 (p < 0.001), use of prior chemotherapy (p = 0.001), and radiosurgery at the time of recurrence (p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis showed that younger age (p < 0.0001) and smaller tumor volume (< 14 cm3) (p = 0.001) were significantly associated with increased OS after SRS. Adverse radiation effects were seen in 69 patients (23%). Fifty-eight patients (19.5%) underwent additional resection after SRS. The median survivals after diagnosis for recursive partitioning analysis Classes III, IV and V+VI were 31.6, 20.8, and 16.7 months, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

In this analysis 30% of a heterogeneous cohort of GBM patients eligible for SRS had an OS of 2 years. Radiosurgery at the time of tumor progression was associated with a median survival of 21.8 months. The role of radiosurgery for GBMs remains controversial. The findings in this study support the need for a funded and appropriately designed clinical trial that will provide a higher level of evidence regarding the future role of SRS for glioblastoma patients in whom disease has progressed despite standard management.

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L. Dade Lunsford, Aftab A. Khan, Ajay Niranjan, Hideyuki Kano, John C. Flickinger, and Douglas Kondziolka

Object

A retrospective study was conducted to reassess the benefit and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with solitary cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) that bleed repeatedly and are poor candidates for surgical removal.

Methods

Between 1988 and 2005 at the University of Pittsburgh, the authors performed SRS in 103 evaluable patients (57 males and 46 females) with solitary symptomatic CCMs. The mean patient age was 39.3 years. Ninety-eight percent of these patients had experienced 2 or more hemorrhages associated with new neurological deficits. Seventeen patients (16.5%) had undergone attempted resection before radiosurgery. Ninety-three CCMs were located in deep brain structures and 10 were in subcortical lobar areas of functional brain importance. The median malformation volume was 1.31 ml, and the median tumor margin dose was 16 Gy.

Results

The follow-up ranged from 2 to 20 years. The annual hemorrhage rate—that is, a new neurological deficit associated with imaging evidence of a new hemorrhage—before SRS was 32.5%. After SRS 22 hemorrhages were observed within 2 years (10.8% annual hemorrhage rate) and 4 hemorrhages were observed after 2 years (1.06% annual hemorrhage rate). The risk of hemorrhage from a CCM was significantly reduced after radiosurgery (p < 0.0001). Overall, new neurological deficits due to adverse radiation effects following SRS developed in 14 patients (13.5%), with most occurring early in our experience. Modifications in technique (treatment volume within the T2-weighted MR imaging–defined margin, use of MR imaging, and dose reduction for CCM in critical brainstem locations) further reduced risks after SRS.

Conclusions

Data in this study provide further evidence that SRS is a relatively safe procedure that reduces the rebleeding rate for CCMs located in high-surgical-risk areas of the brain.

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Greg Bowden, Hideyuki Kano, Ellen Caparosa, Seong-Hyun Park, Ajay Niranjan, John Flickinger, and L. Dade Lunsford

OBJECT

Non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most frequent cancer that metastasizes to brain. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has become the management of choice for most patients with such metastatic tumors. Therefore, the authors endeavored to elucidate the survival and SRS outcomes for patients with NSCLC metastasis at their center.

METHODS

In this single-institution retrospective analysis, the authors reviewed their experience with NSCLC metastasis during a 10-year period from 2001 to 2010. Seven hundred twenty patients underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery. A total of 1004 SRS procedures were performed, and 3143 tumors were treated. The NSCLC subtype was adenocarcinoma in 386 patients, squamous cell carcinoma in 111 patients, and large cell carcinoma in 34 patients. The median aggregate tumor volume was 4.5 cm3 (range 0.1–88 cm3).

RESULTS

The median survival time after diagnosis of brain metastasis from NSCLC was 12.6 months, and the median survival after SRS was 8.5 months. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates after SRS were 39%, 21%, and 10%, respectively. Postradiosurgery survival was decreased in patients treated with prior whole-brain radiation therapy compared with SRS alone (p = 0.003). Aggregate tumor volume was inversely related to survival after SRS (p < 0.001), and the histological subgroups demonstrated significant survival differences (p = 0.023). The overall local tumor control rate in the entire group was 92.8%. One hundred seventy-four patients (24%) underwent repeat SRS for new or resistant metastatic deposits.

CONCLUSIONS

Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective means of providing local control for NSCLC metastases. Neurological function and survival benefit from serial patient monitoring and repeat SRS for new tumors.

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Thomas Flannery, Hideyuki Kano, Juan J. Martin, Ajay Niranjan, John C. Flickinger, L. Dade Lunsford, and Douglas Kondziolka

Object

The aim in this study was to determine the outcomes of boost stereotactic radiosurgery, specifically Gamma Knife surgery (GKS), for recurrent primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) in children in whom initial multimodality management had failed.

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 7 patients who underwent a total of 15 GKS procedures for locally recurrent or metastatic PNETs. Nine procedures were directed at the primary site, whereas 6 were directed at distant brain sites. All patients received multimodality therapy, including resection, fractionated radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. The mean interval from diagnosis to first stereotactic radiosurgery was 25.8 months (range 11–35 months). The mean tumor volume was 3.9 cm3 (range 1.1–13.1 cm3), and an average marginal dose of 14.5 Gy (range 9–20 Gy) was administered.

Results

Following salvage GKS, 2 patients had early disease progression (median survival of 5 months after GKS). Five patients had late disease progression (complete response in 3, partial response in 1, and stable disease in 1) and a median survival of 30 months after GKS. Four of the 5 patients who had late progression underwent repeat GKS for marginal recurrence. No adverse radiation effects were observed in these 7 patients.

Conclusions

The GKS modality was a well-tolerated and useful boost strategy in pediatric patients with PNET and a poor prognosis in whom initial multimodality management had failed. However, local or distant disease progression or diffuse leptomeningeal spread ultimately proved fatal to these patients.

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Greg Bowden, Hideyuki Kano, Huai-che Yang, Ajay Niranjan, John Flickinger, and L. Dade Lunsford

Object

The outcomes of stereotactic radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) within or adjacent to the ventricular system are largely unknown. This study assessed the long-term outcomes and hemorrhage risks for patients with AVMs within this region who underwent Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) at the University of Pittsburgh.

Methods

The authors retrospectively identified 188 patients with ventricular-region AVMs who underwent a single-stage GKS procedure during a 22-year interval. The median patient age was 32 years (range 3–80 years), the median target volume was 4.6 cm3 (range 0.1–22 cm3), and the median marginal dose was 20 Gy (range 13–27 Gy).

Results

Arteriovenous malformation obliteration was confirmed by MRI or angiography in 89 patients during a median follow-up of 65 months (range 2–265 months). The actuarial rates of total obliteration were 32% at 3 years, 55% at 4 years, 60% at 5 years, and 64% at 10 years. Higher rates of AVM obliteration were obtained in the 26 patients with intraventricular AVMs. Twenty-five patients (13%) sustained a hemorrhage during the initial latency interval after GKS, indicating an annual hemorrhage rate of 3.4% prior to AVM obliteration. No patient experienced a hemorrhage after AVM obliteration was confirmed by imaging. Permanent neurological deficits due to adverse radiation effects developed in 7 patients (4%).

Conclusions

Although patients in this study demonstrated an elevated hemorrhage risk that remained until complete obliteration, GKS still proved to be a generally safe and effective treatment for patients with these high-risk intraventricular and periventriclar AVMs.