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Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to vascular compression and neurocysticercosis: illustrative case

Mao Vásquez, Luis J. Saavedra, Hector H. García, Evelyn Vela, Jorge E. Medina, Miguel Lozano, Carlos Hoyos, and William W. Lines-Aguilar

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is the most common type of facial pain, negatively affecting quality of life and work capacity in 34% of patients. 1 TN has a prevalence of 4–13 cases per 100,000 inhabitants 1–3 and generally affects patients older than 50 years, with a female-to-male ratio of 1.5 to 1. In primary (classic) TN, compression by vascular loops is found at the entrance of the trigeminal nerve to the brainstem. 4 , 5 In secondary TN, 6 , 7 extrinsic compression of the trigeminal nerve triggers the pain. The most common causes of extrinsic TN are

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Simultaneous microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm involving a dolichoectatic vertebral artery in an elderly patient: illustrative case

Neelan J. Marianayagam, Hanya M. Qureshi, Sagar Vasandani, Shaurey Vetsa, Muhammad Jalal, Kun Wu, and Jennifer Moliterno

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and hemifacial spasm (HFS) refractory to medical management can commonly be the result of direct contact by an aberrant vessel compressing the root entry zone (REZ) of the trigeminal and facial nerves, respectively. Microvascular decompression (MVD) has been shown to provide lasting relief. 1 In TN, the offending vessel is usually the superior cerebellar artery, whereas in HFS, it is usually the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. There are instances, however, in which an enlarged or dolichoectatic vertebral artery (DVA) can be the