Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Koji Iihara x
  • User-accessible content x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Eika Hamano, Hiroharu Kataoka, Naomi Morita, Daisuke Maruyama, Tetsu Satow, Koji Iihara and Jun C. Takahashi

OBJECTIVE

Transient neurological symptoms are frequently observed during the early postoperative period after direct bypass surgery for moyamoya disease. Abnormal signal changes in the cerebral cortex can be seen in postoperative MR images. The purpose of this study was to reveal the radiological features of the “cortical hyperintensity belt (CHB) sign” in postoperative FLAIR images and to verify its relationship to transient neurological events (TNEs) and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF).

METHODS

A total of 141 hemispheres in 107 consecutive patients with moyamoya disease who had undergone direct bypass surgery were analyzed. In all cases, FLAIR images were obtained during postoperative days (PODs) 1–3 and during the chronic period (3.2 ± 1.13 months after surgery). The CHB sign was defined as an intraparenchymal high-intensity signal within the cortex of the surgically treated hemisphere with no infarction or hemorrhage present. The territory of the middle cerebral artery was divided into anterior and posterior parts, with the extent of the CHB sign in each part scored as 0 for none; 1 for presence in less than half of the part; and 2 for presence in more than half of the part. The sum of these scores provided the CHB score (0–4). TNEs were defined as reversible neurological deficits detected both objectively and subjectively. The rCBF was measured with SPECT using N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine before surgery and during PODs 1–3. The rCBF increase ratio was calculated by comparing the pre- and postoperative count activity.

RESULTS

Cortical hyperintensity belt signs were detected in 112 cases (79.4%) and all disappeared during the chronic period. Although all bypass grafts were anastomosed to the anterior part of the middle cerebral artery territory, CHB signs were much more pronounced in the posterior part (p < 0.0001). TNEs were observed in 86 cases (61.0%). Patients with TNEs showed significantly higher CHB scores than those without (2.31 ± 0.13 vs 1.24 ± 0.16, p < 0.0001). The CHB score, on the other hand, showed no relationship with the rCBF increase ratio (p = 0.775). In addition, the rCBF increase ratio did not differ between those patients with TNEs and those without (1.15 ± 0.033 vs 1.16 ± 0.037, p = 0.978).

CONCLUSIONS

The findings strongly suggest that the presence of the CHB sign during PODs 1–3 can be a predictor of TNEs after bypass surgery for moyamoya disease. On the other hand, presence of this sign appears to have no direct relationship with the postoperative local hyperperfusion phenomenon. Vasogenic edema can be hypothesized as the pathophysiology of the CHB sign, because the sign was transient and never accompanied by infarction in the present series.

Free access

Ryota Kurogi, Akiko Kada, Kunihiro Nishimura, Satoru Kamitani, Ataru Nishimura, Tetsuro Sayama, Jyoji Nakagawara, Kazunori Toyoda, Kuniaki Ogasawara, Junichi Ono, Yoshiaki Shiokawa, Toru Aruga, Shigeru Miyachi, Izumi Nagata, Shinya Matsuda, Shinichi Yoshimura, Kazuo Okuchi, Akifumi Suzuki, Fumiaki Nakamura, Daisuke Onozuka, Akihito Hagihara, Koji Iihara and the J-ASPECT Study Collaborators

OBJECTIVE

Although heterogeneity in patient outcomes following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has been observed across different centers, the relative merits of clipping and coiling for SAH remain unknown. The authors sought to compare the patient outcomes between these therapeutic modalities using a large nationwide discharge database encompassing hospitals with different comprehensive stroke center (CSC) capabilities.

METHODS

They analyzed data from 5214 patients with SAH (clipping 3624, coiling 1590) who had been urgently hospitalized at 393 institutions in Japan in the period from April 2012 to March 2013. In-hospital mortality, modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score, cerebral infarction, complications, hospital length of stay, and medical costs were compared between the clipping and coiling groups after adjustment for patient-level and hospital-level characteristics by using mixed-model analysis.

RESULTS

Patients who had undergone coiling had significantly higher in-hospital mortality (12.4% vs 8.7%, OR 1.3) and a shorter median hospital stay (32.0 vs 37.0 days, p < 0.001) than those who had undergone clipping. The respective proportions of patients discharged with mRS scores of 3–6 (46.4% and 42.9%) and median medical costs (thousands US$, 35.7 and 36.7) were not significantly different between the groups. These results remained robust after further adjustment for CSC capabilities as a hospital-related covariate.

CONCLUSIONS

Despite the increasing use of coiling, clipping remains the mainstay treatment for SAH. Regardless of CSC capabilities, clipping was associated with reduced in-hospital mortality, similar unfavorable functional outcomes and medical costs, and a longer hospital stay as compared with coiling in 2012 in Japan. Further study is required to determine the influence of unmeasured confounders.