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Garnette R. Sutherland

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Taro Kaibara, R. John Hurlbert and Garnette R. Sutherland

Object

Because transoral decompression of the cervicomedullary junction is compromised by a narrow surgical corridor, the adequacy of decompression/resection may be difficult to determine. This is problematic as spinal hardware may obscure postoperative radiological assessment, or the patient may require reoperation. The authors report three patients in whom high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired at various stages during the transoral resection of C-2 lesions causing craniocervical junction compression.

Methods

In all three patients the lesions involved the cervicomedullary junction: one case each of plasmacytoma and metastatic breast carcinoma involving the odontoid process and C-2 vertebral body, and one case of basilar invagination with a Chiari type I malformation. All three patients presented with progressive myelopathy. Surgery-planning MR imaging studies, performed after the induction of anesthesia, demonstrated the lesion and its relationship to the planned surgical corridor. Transoral exposure was achieved through placement of a Crockard retractor system. In one case the soft palate was divided. Interdissection MR imaging revealed that adequate decompression had been achieved in all cases. In the two patients with carcinoma, posterior instrumentation was placed to achieve spinal stabilization. Planned suboccipital decompression and fixation was averted in the third case because MR imaging demonstrated that excellent decompression had been achieved.

Conclusions

Intraoperatively acquired MR images were instrumental in determining the adequacy of surgical decompression. In one patient the MR images changed the planned surgical procedure. Importantly, the acquisition of intraoperative MR images did not adversely affect operative time or neurosurgical techniques, including the instrumentation procedure.

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Deon F. Louw, Wilson T. Asfora and Garnette R. Sutherland

In this communication the authors outline the development of aneurysm clips from those originally used by Walter Dandy to those currently in use. The history is rich in contributions from neurosurgical pioneers and innovators. As a result, the modern neurosurgeon has a wide selection of biocompatible aneurysm clips with known closing pressure, of variable sizes and shapes, and a selection of clip applicators that do not obstruct the surgical field.

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Garnette R. Sutherland, Taro Kaibara, Deon Louw and John Saunders

The authors' goal was to place a mobile, 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance (MR) imaging system into a neurosurgical operating room without adversely affecting established neurosurgical management. The system would help to plan accurate surgical corridors, confirm the accomplishment of operative objectives, and detect acute complications such as hemorrhage or ischemia.

The authors used an actively shielded 1.5 tesla magnet, together with 15 m tesla/m gradients, MR console computers, gradient amplifiers, a titanium, hydraulic-controlled operating table, and a radio frequency coil that can be disassembled. The magnet is moved to and from the surgical field by using overhead crane technology. To date, the system has provided unfettered access to 46 neurosurgical patients.

In all patients, high-definition T1- and/or T2-weighted images were rapidly and reproducibly acquired at various stages of the surgical procedures. Eleven patients underwent craniotomy that was optimized after pre-incisional imaging. In four patients who harbored subtotally resected tumor, intraoperative MR imaging allowed removal of remaining tumor. Interestingly, the intraoperative administration of gadolinium in the management of patients with malignant glioma demonstrated a dynamic expansion of enhancement beyond the preoperative contrast contour. These zones of new enhancement proved, on examination of biopsy sample, to be tumor.

The authors have demonstrated that high-quality MR images can be obtained within reasonable time constraints in the operating room. Procedures can be conducted without compromising or altering traditional neurosurgical, nursing, or anesthetic techniques. It is feasible that within the next decade intraoperative MR imaging may become the standard of care in neurosurgery.

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Daniel Yavin, Judy Luu, Matthew T. James, Derek J. Roberts, Garnette R. Sutherland, Nathalie Jette and Samuel Wiebe

Object

Because clinical examination and imaging may be unreliable indicators of intracranial hypertension, intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement has been proposed as a noninvasive method of diagnosis. The authors conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the correlation between IOP and intracranial pressure (ICP) and the diagnostic accuracy of IOP measurement for detection of intracranial hypertension.

Methods

The authors searched bibliographic databases (Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) from 1950 to March 2013, references of included studies, and conference abstracts for studies comparing IOP and invasive ICP measurement. Two independent reviewers screened abstracts, reviewed full-text articles, and extracted data. Correlation coefficients, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios were calculated using DerSimonian and Laird methods and bivariate random effects models. The I2 statistic was used as a measure of heterogeneity.

Results

Among 355 identified citations, 12 studies that enrolled 546 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled correlation coefficient between IOP and ICP was 0.44 (95% CI 0.26–0.63, I2 = 97.7%, p < 0.001). The summary sensitivity and specificity for IOP for diagnosing intracranial hypertension were 81% (95% CI 26%–98%, I2 = 95.2%, p < 0.01) and 95% (95% CI 43%–100%, I2 = 97.7%, p < 0.01), respectively. The summary positive and negative likelihood ratios were 14.8 (95% CI 0.5–417.7) and 0.2 (95% CI 0.02–1.7), respectively. When ICP and IOP measurements were taken within 1 hour of another, correlation between the measures improved.

Conclusions

Although a modest aggregate correlation was found between IOP and ICP, the pooled diagnostic accuracy suggests that IOP measurement may be of clinical utility in the detection of intracranial hypertension. Given the significant heterogeneity between included studies, further investigation is required prior to the adoption of IOP in the evaluation of intracranial hypertension into routine practice.