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Ingrid Kieran, Zaitun Zakaria, Chandrasekaran Kaliaperumal, Declan O'Rourke, Alan O'Hare, Eoghan Laffan, John Caird, Mary D. King and Dylan J. Murray

The authors describe the case of a 3-year-old boy with a giant congenital vertex hemangioma who underwent presurgical embolization with Onyx (ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide) and Glubran (N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate). This vascular tumor had no intracranial vascular communication as assessed by pre-embolization MRI and catheter angiography. All embolizations were performed by direct percutaneous injection. One week following the last embolization procedure the child presented with a 24-hour history of ataxia and extrapyramidal tremor. He was diagnosed with a possible immune-mediated reaction to Onyx or Glubran, which was treated with an urgent surgical excision of the hemangioma followed by intravenous administration of immunoglobulin and steroids. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of possible immune-mediated toxicity secondary to either Onyx or Glubran administration. This case highlights the need for awareness of potential toxic reactions to these embolic agents in the treatment of hemangiomas in the pediatric patient.

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Zaitun Zakaria, Chandrasekaran Kaliaperumal, Darach Crimmins and John Caird

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of neurosurgical treatment in children with bleeding diathesis and also to evaluate the current management plan applied in the authors’ service.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively analyzed all cases in which neurosurgical procedures were performed in pediatric patients presenting with intracranial hematoma due to an underlying bleeding tendency over a 5-year period at their institution. They evaluated the patients’ neurological symptoms from the initial referral, hematological abnormalities, surgical treatment, neurological outcome, and scores on the Pediatric Glasgow Outcome Scale–Extended (GOS-E Peds) obtained 1 year after the last operation.

RESULTS

Five patients with a bleeding diathesis who underwent surgery for intracranial hematoma were identified; the diagnosis was hemophilia A in 3 cases, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 1 case, and severe aplastic anemia in 1 case. Intracerebral hematoma (ICH) (n = 4) and acute subdural hematoma (n = 1) were confirmed on radiological investigations. In 2 of the 4 patients with ICH, the diagnosis of bleeding diathesis was made for the first time on presentation. Four patients (all male) were younger than 2 years; the patient with severe aplastic anemia and spontaneous ICH was 15 years old and female. The duration of symptoms varied from 24 hours to 5 days. Neurological examination at 1 year’s follow-up showed complete recovery (GOS-E Peds score of 1) in 3 cases and mild weakness (GOS-E Peds score of 2) in 2 cases.

CONCLUSIONS

Neurosurgical management of patients with bleeding diathesis should be carried out in a tertiary-care setting with multidisciplinary team management, including members with expertise in neuroimaging and hematology, in addition to neurosurgery. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of a bleeding diathesis is crucial for full neurological recovery.