Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Vincent Degos x
  • Refine by Access: user x
  • By Author: Mathon, Bertrand x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Aymeric Amelot, Maximilien Riche, Samuel Latreille, Vincent Degos, Alexandre Carpentier, Bertrand Mathon, and Anne-Marie Korinek

OBJECTIVE

The authors sought to evaluate the roles of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in noninstrumented spine surgery (NISS), both in postoperative infections and the impact on the selection of resistant bacteria. To the authors’ knowledge, only one prospective study recommending preoperative intravenous (IV) antibiotics for prophylaxis has been published previously.

METHODS

Two successive prospective IV antibiotic prophylaxis protocols were used: from 2011 to 2013 (group A: no prophylactic antibiotic) and from 2014 to 2016 (group B: prophylactic cefazolin). Patient infection rates, infection risk factors, and bacteriological status were determined.

RESULTS

In total, 2250 patients (1031 in group A and 1219 in group B) were followed for at least 1 year. The authors identified 72 surgical site infections, 51 in group A (4.9%) and 21 in group B (1.7%) (p < 0.0001). A multiple logistic regression hazard model identified male sex (HR 2.028, 95% CI 1.173–3.509; p = 0.011), cervical laminectomy (HR 2.078, 95% CI 1.147–3.762; p = 0.016), and postoperative CSF leak (HR 43.782, 95% CI 10.9–189.9; p < 0.0001) as independent predictive risk factors of infection. In addition, preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis was the only independent favorable factor (HR 0.283, 95% CI 0.164–0.488; p < 0.0001) that significantly reduced infections for NISS. Of 97 bacterial infections, cefazolin-resistant bacteria were identified in 26 (26.8%), with significantly more in group B (40%) than in group A (20.9%) (p = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS

A single dose of preoperative cefazolin is effective and mandatory in preventing surgical site infections in NISS. Single-dose antibiotic prophylaxis has an immediate impact on cutaneous flora by increasing cefazolin-resistant bacteria.

Restricted access

Maximilien Riche, Pauline Marijon, Aymeric Amelot, Franck Bielle, Karima Mokhtari, Marc Pineton de Chambrun, Alexandre Le Joncour, Ahmed Idbaih, Mehdi Touat, Chung-Hi Do, Mamadou Deme, Romain Pasqualotto, Alice Jacquens, Vincent Degos, Eimad Shotar, Lydia Chougar, Alexandre Carpentier, and Bertrand Mathon

OBJECTIVE

The literature shows discrepancies in stereotactic brain biopsy complication rates, severities, and outcomes. Little is known about the timeline of postbiopsy complications. This study aimed to analyze 1) complications following brain biopsies, using a graded severity scale, and 2) a timeline of complication occurrence. The secondary objectives were to determine factors associated with an increased risk of complications and to assess complication-related management and extra costs.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively examined 1500 consecutive stereotactic brain biopsies performed in adult patients at their tertiary medical center between April 2009 and April 2019.

RESULTS

Three hundred eighty-one biopsies (25.4%) were followed by a complication, including 88.2% of asymptomatic hemorrhages. Symptomatic complications involved 3.0% of the biopsies, and 0.8% of the biopsies were fatal. The severity grading scale had a 97.6% interobserver reproducibility. Twenty-three (51.1%) of the 45 symptomatic complications occurred within the 1st hour following the biopsy, while 75.6% occurred within the first 6 hours. Age ≥ 65 years, second biopsy procedures, gadolinium-enhanced lesions, glioblastomas, and lymphomas were predictors of biopsy-related complications. Brainstem biopsy-targeted lesions and cerebral toxoplasmosis were predictive of mortality. Asymptomatic hemorrhage was associated with delayed (> 6 hours) symptomatic complications. Symptomatic complications led to extended hospitalization in 86.7% of patients. The average extra cost for management of a patient with postbiopsy symptomatic complication was $35,702.

CONCLUSIONS

Symptomatic complications from brain biopsies are infrequent but associated with substantial adverse effects and cost implications for the healthcare system. The use of a severity grading scale, as the authors propose in this article, helps to classify complications according to the therapeutic consequences and the patient’s outcome. Because this study indicates that most complications occur within the first few hours following the biopsy, postbiopsy monitoring can be tailored accordingly. The authors therefore recommend systematic monitoring for 2 hours in the recovery unit and a CT scan 2 hours after the end of the biopsy procedure. In addition, they propose a modern algorithm for optimal postoperative management of patients undergoing stereotactic biopsy.