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Evaluation of smartphone-integrated magnetometers in detection of safe electromagnetic devices for use near programmable shunt valves: a proof-of-concept study

Smruti K. Patel, Jorge Zamorano-Fernández, Carlie McCoy, and Jesse Skoch

data, patients are generally advised to simply restrict their use in the vicinity of a PV. Universal restriction of the use of such devices may have a negative impact on patients’ quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the MFs of reference devices using smartphone-integrated magnetometers and compare the results with those of published shunt tolerances to determine the potential to translate existing precautionary data to applicable values from smartphone magnetometers. Furthermore, we sought to assess the consistency of measurements across

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Technology preferences among caregivers of children with hydrocephalus

Clinical article

Robert P. Naftel, Nicole A. Safiano, Michael I. Falola, Chevis N. Shannon, John C. Wellons III, and James M. Johnston Jr.

, Internet, and Social Media Personal Use The majority of caregivers owned computers, digital music players, and smartphones. Most (94.6%) used computers, and 86.7% had a computer at home. More caregivers had access to an iPod or digital music player (70.3%) than a smartphone (56.9%). The majority (91.7%) of caregivers surveyed used the Internet (e-caregivers), and 90.3% of e-caregivers had access at home. Most e-caregivers (62.8%) used the Internet 7 days a week, and 83.0% used the Internet most days of the week (4 or more days). E-caregivers indicated that they most

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Ultrasound stylet for non-image-guided ventricular catheterization

Nathaniel K. Coulson, Peter A. Chiarelli, David K. Su, Jason J. Chang, Brian MacConaghy, Revathi Murthy, Peter Toms, Terrence L. Robb, Richard G. Ellenbogen, Samuel R. Browd, and Pierre D. Mourad

variability. Beyond infrared and inductive-coupled magnetic tracking systems, groups have used fiberoptic endoscope technology and robotic assistance for catheter placement. 22 , 24 , 33 , 40 , 41 Thomale et al. have described a fixed-frame guidance system comprised of a rigid arc, catheter guide tube, and coordinates calculated with smartphone software analyzing an uploaded DICOM image. 42 To date, ultrasound-image assisted ventricular catheter placement has predominantly occurred in the intraoperative setting. 1 , 3 , 7 , 17 , 32 , 34 , 37–39 Early placement

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Image processing and machine learning for telehealth craniosynostosis screening in newborns

Markus J. Bookland, Edward S. Ahn, Petronella Stoltz, and Jonathan E. Martin

diagnostic device, we feel encouraged that this software can provide accurate and meaningful diagnostic feedback for users. If incorporated into a smartphone application, this tool could allow families and providers questioning the severity of a child’s cranial deformity to simply acquire a set of orthogonally oriented photos of the child’s head and face, and the software could then provide CI (scaphocephaly, brachycephaly), CVAI (plagiocephaly), AAA (trigonocephaly), and TCLA (anterior congenital plagiocephaly) measurements that can be trended over time and interpreted

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Successful surgical repair and recovery in a 2-week-old infant after birth-related cervical fracture dislocation

Sara Saleh, Kyle I. Swanson, and Taryn Bragg

left wrist and fingers remained flexed. He would use the tenodesis effect of wrist extension and flexion to aid in grasping and releasing, respectively. However, he was able to play with a smartphone by grasping it with the second and third fingers and using his thumb on the screen. His neck had a normal range of motion without pain, but the physical therapy team noted that the patient had impaired neck strength. He was able to mount, ride, and dismount a tricycle on his own and steer with his hands. The patient was using a thoracolumbosacral orthosis brace because

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Socioeconomic patient benefits of a pediatric neurosurgery telemedicine clinic

Kelsey Hayward, Sabrina H. Han, Alexander Simko, Hector E. James, and Philipp R. Aldana

. 1 Although the no-show rate for underinsured/uninsured patients in the present study was 56%, this rate is similar to that seen in our own in-person pediatric neurosurgery clinic (unpublished results) and that seen in other pediatric clinics. 8 Thus, we believe that if a telemedicine option did not exist for this population, they would probably not receive any elective care for their conditions. Telemedicine technology is constantly evolving with changing resources, such as smartphones, tablets, and others. These handheld devices were not used in this clinic and

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Toward a transitional care from childhood and adolescence to adulthood in surgical neurooncology? A lesson from the Necker-Enfants Malades and the Sainte-Anne Hospitals collaboration

Alexandre Roux, Kévin Beccaria, Thomas Blauwblomme, Nizar Mahlaoui, Fabrice Chretien, Pascale Varlet, Stéphanie Puget, and Johan Pallud

, awareness, prevention, and health promotion for adolescents and their families. A multidisciplinary team offers a personalized welcome and individual consultations (e.g., neurosurgery, gynecology, dermatology, image consulting, occupational medicine). Group workshops and conferences for young people and parents are also organized. Digital tools have also been created (the “Noa” application for smartphones and a website, http://www.la-suite-necker.aphp.fr ) to facilitate the daily life of these patients (personalized alerts for scheduling appointments and medication

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Toward a transitional care from childhood and adolescence to adulthood in surgical neurooncology? A lesson from the Necker-Enfants Malades and the Sainte-Anne Hospitals collaboration

Alexandre Roux, Kévin Beccaria, Thomas Blauwblomme, Nizar Mahlaoui, Fabrice Chretien, Pascale Varlet, Stéphanie Puget, and Johan Pallud

, awareness, prevention, and health promotion for adolescents and their families. A multidisciplinary team offers a personalized welcome and individual consultations (e.g., neurosurgery, gynecology, dermatology, image consulting, occupational medicine). Group workshops and conferences for young people and parents are also organized. Digital tools have also been created (the “Noa” application for smartphones and a website, http://www.la-suite-necker.aphp.fr ) to facilitate the daily life of these patients (personalized alerts for scheduling appointments and medication

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Clinical metrics and tools for provider assessment and tracking of trigonocephaly

Nathan K. Leclair, Joshua Chern, Edward S. Ahn, Megan Chamis, Mitch R. Paro, William A. Lambert, Petronella Stoltz, David S. Hersh, Jonathan E. Martin, and Markus J. Bookland

curvature analysis. As smartphone technology evolves, the ability to render 3D models using simple camera applications may provide exciting 3D photography−based approaches that enhance accuracy or allow for integration of multiple surface-based landmarks. 10 However, we found that AAA 2D-photo measurements derived from single-view 2D patient photographs already perform exceedingly well at enabling the discrimination of nonmetopic craniosynostosis deformities from metopic craniosynostosis, with AUC values > 0.75, although additional data points are needed to identify the

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Development of best practices to minimize wound complications after complex tethered spinal cord surgery: a modified Delphi study

Nikita G. Alexiades, Edward S. Ahn, Jeffrey P. Blount, Douglas L. Brockmeyer, Samuel R. Browd, Gerald A. Grant, Gregory G. Heuer, Todd C. Hankinson, Bermans J. Iskandar, Andrew Jea, Mark D. Krieger, Jeffrey R. Leonard, David D. Limbrick Jr., Cormac O. Maher, Mark R. Proctor, David I. Sandberg, John C. Wellons III, Belinda Shao, Neil A. Feldstein, and Richard C. E. Anderson

face-to-face meeting was held in December 2017 with 14 participants in attendance. All participants used an anonymous audience response system (Poll Everywhere) to enter their responses to statements via their personal smartphone or computer. Responses were tallied and projected in real time to the participants. Statements that had already reached consensus were briefly reviewed, whereas statements near consensus were discussed in detail and modified to try to achieve consensus. Finalized statements with ≥ 80% consensus were then incorporated into a consensus