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Ventral foramen magnum meningiomas

Kenan I. Arnautović, Ossama Al-Mefty, and Muhammad Husain

F oramen magnum meningiomas arise at the dura of the craniocervical junction. The zone from which they arise corresponds anteriorly to the area between the lower third of the clivus and the upper edge of the axis, laterally from the jugular tubercle to the upper aspect of the C-2 lamina and posteriorly from the anterior edge of the squamous occipital bone to the C-2 spinous process. 17–19 These lesions represent 0.3 to 3.2% of all meningiomas, 4.2 to 20% of all posterior fossa meningiomas, and 60 to 77% of all benign extramedullary tumors at the craniospinal

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Intraspinal familial clear cell meningioma in a mother and child

Case report

Jason A. Heth, Patricia Kirby, and Arnold H. Menezes

M eningiomas are relatively common intracranial and spinal tumors in adults but their occurrence in children is uncommon. Many case reports have documented familial meningioma and current debate centers on whether familial meningiomas are allelic to neurofibromatosis. Clear cell meningioma is a variant that has only recently been described. We present the cases of a 7-year-old girl and her mother who each harbored a familial clear cell meningioma. Case Reports Case 1 This 7-year-old right-handed girl presented with a 4-month history of lower back

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Spinal meningioma after treatment for Hodgkin disease

Case report

Andrew J. Martin, Christopher J. Hammond, H. Jane Dobbs, Safa Al-Sarraj, and Nicholas W. M. Thomas

) comprise the majority of second malignancies. They are most strongly associated with previous combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy and have continued to develop at increased frequency for many decades. Forms of leukemia also occur, usually in patients who have undergone chemotherapy and within 10 years of treatment. We present, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of a spinal meningioma that seems likely to have been induced by combined-modality treatment for Hodgkin disease. Case Report First Presentation and Examination In 1991, this 26-year

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Epidural meningioma of the sacral canal

Case report

Scott A. Rutherford, Kim M. Linton, Jonathan M. Durnian, and Richard A. Cowie

M eningiomas account for 25% of all intraspinal neoplasms and are the second most common primary intraspinal tumor. Meningiomas located at the caudal end of the spine are rare; only a few cases have been reported. Epidural meningiomas represent a small minority, whether occurring wholly or partially in the epidural space. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of a primary epidural meningioma arising in the sacral region. The clinical course of the patient was also unusual, with a benign histological appearance belying the aggressive

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Development of postoperative fibromatosis after resection of an intraspinal meningioma

Case report

James J. Lynch, Javad Parvizi, Bernd W. Scheithauer, and William E. Krauss

F ibromatoses or “desmoid tumors,” are uncommon infiltrative lesions that affect musculoaponeurotic structures, most often of the trunk and limbs, 6 and only rare examples appear in the neurosurgical literature. 8, 11–13, 15 In our patient, we presumed the lesion was recurrent meningioma in the paraspinous region because it arose in the site of a previously resected meningioma. Fibromatoses are known to occur in association with surgical scars or implants. 2, 4, 9, 17 Similar to some reported cases, development of our patient's tumor was preceded by wound

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Massive growth of a meningioma into the brachial plexus and thoracic cavity after intraspinal and supraclavicular resection

Case report and review of the literature

Edward R. Smith, Mark Ott, John Wain, David N. Louis, and E. Antonio Chiocca

M ost extracranial and -spinal meningiomas (extraaxial meningiomas) occur secondarily, either by direct extension or by metastasis. Less commonly, they occur as ectopic primary meningiomas. Altogether, extraaxial meningiomas comprise only approximately 2% of all meningiomas. 5 Meningiomas rarely involve the brachial plexus; only two documented cases of primary brachial plexus meningioma have been reported. 4 Furthermore, there has been only one case in which an intraspinal meningioma was shown to invade the brachial plexus. 11 The occurrence of thoracic

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Infantile spinal cord meningioma

Case illustration

Masahiko Watanabe, Kazuhiro Chiba, Morio Matsumoto, Hirofumi Maruiwa, Yoshikazu Fujimura, and Yoshiaki Toyama

. 1 ). The tumor was well separated from the spinal cord by the interposing arachnoid, making it possible to resect the tumor totally with its dural attachment via sagittal splitting laminoplasty. The dura was closed with a dorsal fascia patch. The split spinous process was closed using multiple threads to reconstruct the spinal canal. Examination of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of the tumor established a diagnosis of xanthomatous meningioma ( Fig. 2 ). Fig. 1. Midsagittal (left) and coronal (right) T 1 -weighted magnetic resonance images

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Spinal meningiomas in patients younger than 50 years of age: a 21-year experience

Aaron A. Cohen-Gadol, Ofer M. Zikel, Cody A. Koch, Bernd W. Scheithauer, and William E. Krauss

F or more than a century, neurosurgeons have been successfully treating patients with spinal meningiomas with “one of the more gratifying” results. 7 Usually, these tumors account for 25% of intraspinal neoplasms and are well-circumscribed and slow-growing lesions. 28 Technological advancements in surgical techniques and neuroimaging have led to improved surgery-related outcomes. Recurrences develop, however, and their incidence is higher after incomplete tumor removal. These tumors may present in younger patients. 3, 14, 18, 30 We report the cumulative

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Thoracic ossified meningioma and osteoporotic burst fracture: treatment with combined vertebroplasty and laminectomy without instrumentation

Case report

Chun-Lin Liu, Po-Liang Lai, Shih-Ming Jung, and Cheng-Chih Liao

O ssified spinal meningioma is rare. Between 1977 and January 2005, no more than 20 such cases were reported in the literature, 10 and in no case was there a concomitant burst fracture at the spinal segments where the tumor was localized. In this report, we discuss the clinical history of a female patient with a T-11 ossified meningioma associated with burst fracture. After a meticulous T-11 percutaneous vertebroplasty, T10–12 laminectomy, and tumor excision, the patient’s clinical symptoms resolved. Although she suffered a right-sided cerebral ischemic

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Concurrent spinal schwannomas and meningiomas

Case illustration

Satoshi Ogihara, Atsushi Seichi, Motoshige Iwasaki, Hiroshi Kawaguchi, Tomoaki Kitagawa, Yasuhito Tajiri, and Kozo Nakamura

The coexistence of spinal schwannoma and meningioma is very rare. 1, 2, 4 We present a case of a 54-year-old woman in whom this condition was diagnosed. The patient noticed a slowly growing mass on the right side of her neck and experienced left upper-extremity numbness and mild gait disturbance. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a dumbbell-type tumor involving the right-sided C-5 nerve root and three intradural extramedullary tumors at C-4, C-5, and T-1 levels ( Fig. 1 , tumors A–D). Tumors A and D exhibited the following characteristics of