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Pediatric spinal clear cell meningioma

Case report

Chaim B. Colen, Mahmoud Rayes, Jamal McClendon Jr., Raja Rabah, and Steven D. Ham

S pinal meningiomas comprise almost 46% of all primary spinal cord tumors, are found predominantly in females, are largely intradural-extramedullary, and occur mostly in the thoracic region. 6 Meningiomas of the lumbosacral region are relatively uncommon. Clear cell meningioma is a rare variant of meningioma; it accounts for 0.2% of all meningiomas, is more common in younger patients, arises more often in spinal or cerebellopontine locations, and shows a more aggressive nature with a higher recurrence rate. Although CCM is considered a benign tumor (WHO

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Meningioma with dural venous sinus invasion and jugular vein extension

Case report

Shobhan Vachhrajani, Andrew Jea, John A. Rutka, Susan Blaser, Michael Cusimano, and James T. Rutka

M eningiomas represent ≤ 3% of the intracranial tumors in the pediatric population and < 2% of meningiomas in all age groups. 2 , 3 , 8 , 10 , 11 , 18 , 28 A report from our institution by Drake et al. 9 has revealed only 13 cases of meningioma among the 1283 intracranial tumors in the children encountered over 51 years, which constitutes an incidence of 1%. A literature review by Mendiratta et al. 17 has indicated an incidence of 1.5% among 2620 cases of intracranial tumors in a pediatric population. Worldwide reports have indicated an incidence

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Meningeal fibroma: a rare meningioma mimic

Report of 2 cases

Aanchal Kakkar, Mehar C. Sharma, Nishant Goyal, Chitra Sarkar, Vaishali Suri, Ajay Garg, Shashank S. Kale, and Ashish Suri

F ibrous proliferative lesions arising from meningeal mesenchymal tissue are extremely rare and include fibromatosis, solitary fibrous tumor (SFT), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, fibroma, and cranial fasciitis. 1 The histological appearance of these lesions is similar to more common tumors such as meningiomas, and therefore they pose a challenge to the diagnostic skills of the pathologist. We report 2 cases of meningeal fibroma, one in a 15-year-old boy and another in an 8-year-old boy, both of which mimicked meningioma on radiological as well as on

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Sporadic pediatric meningiomas: a neuroradiological and neuropathological study of 15 cases

Kristin Huntoon, Charles P. Pluto, Lynne Ruess, Daniel R. Boué, Christopher R. Pierson, Jerome A. Rusin, and Jeffrey Leonard

M eningiomas are the most common nonglial primary tumors of the CNS in adults and the most common extraaxial neoplasm, accounting for approximately 15% of all intracranial tumors. 32 However, intracranial meningiomas in children and adolescents are rare. The incidence of meningiomas before the age of 16 years ranges from 0.4% to 4.6% of all primary brain tumors in this age group. 3 , 23 Meningiomas are generally low-grade neoplasms with several distinctive pathological and imaging features. However, there are several important histological variants of

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Middle fossa approach for a pediatric facial nerve meningioma

Robert C. Rennert, Danielle M. Levy, Jillian Plonsker, Jeffrey A. Steinberg, Rick A. Friedman, John R. Crawford, and Michael L. Levy

M eningiomas represent less than 3% of pediatric CNS tumors, 1 and when they do occur in children, the vast majority (approximately 90%) are supratentorial. 1 , 2 Pediatric cerebellopontine angle (CPA) meningiomas are thus exceedingly rare. 3 Described treatments typically involve radiation and/or resection, most commonly via a retrosigmoid craniotomy, 1 with the majority of surgically treated patients being 4 years of age or older. 1 , 4 Although use of skull base approaches in the pediatric population is both relatively limited and potentially complicated

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Radiation-associated meningiomas in children: clinical, pathological, and cytogenetic characteristics with a critical review of the literature

Clinical article

Samer K. Elbabaa, Murat Gokden, John R. Crawford, Santosh Kesari, and Ali G. Saad

M eningioma is a rare tumor in children with an incidence of 2.19% among all CNS tumors. 1 , 13 , 23 In a large review of the literature, Sheikh et al. 69 found that, in contrast to meningiomas in the adult population, those in children occurred more in males than in females. As in adults, the meningothelial variant is the most common in children, followed by the fibroblastic and transitional types, and the majority of childhood sporadic meningiomas are low grade. 64 The concept of radiation-induced tumor development goes back to 1933 with the

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Predictors of progression in radiation-induced versus nonradiation-induced pediatric meningiomas: a large single-institution surgical experience

Mohammed A. Fouda, Emily L. Day, David Zurakowski, R. Michael Scott, Edward R. Smith, Karen J. Marcus, and Katie P. Fehnel

P ediatric meningiomas are rare, accounting for 1% of all meningiomas and only 2% of pediatric CNS tumors 1 , 2 and are classically thought to be biologically and histologically more aggressive than their adult counterparts. 3–5 Radiation-induced meningiomas are the most common secondary malignancy in childhood cancer survivors 6 , 7 and are suggested to be more aggressive than nonradiation-induced meningiomas with respect to risk of recurrence/progression. 6 , 8–14 Due to the overall rarity of pediatric meningiomas, the risk of recurrence and

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Predictors of progression in radiation-induced versus nonradiation-induced pediatric meningiomas: a large single-institution surgical experience

Mohammed A. Fouda, Emily L. Day, David Zurakowski, R. Michael Scott, Edward R. Smith, Karen J. Marcus, and Katie P. Fehnel

P ediatric meningiomas are rare, accounting for 1% of all meningiomas and only 2% of pediatric CNS tumors 1 , 2 and are classically thought to be biologically and histologically more aggressive than their adult counterparts. 3–5 Radiation-induced meningiomas are the most common secondary malignancy in childhood cancer survivors 6 , 7 and are suggested to be more aggressive than nonradiation-induced meningiomas with respect to risk of recurrence/progression. 6 , 8–14 Due to the overall rarity of pediatric meningiomas, the risk of recurrence and

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Third ventricular chordoid meningioma in a child

Case report

Kyung Sun Song, Sung-Hye Park, Byung-Kyu Cho, Kyu-Chang Wang, Ji Hoon Phi, and Seung-Ki Kim

M eningiomas account for 15–25% of primary intracranial tumors in adults but less than 3% of primary intracranial tumors in children. 18 , 20 Primary meningiomas in the ventricular system without dural attachments are extremely rare and constitute only 0.5–5% of intracranial meningiomas. 19 Chordoid meningioma, a rare variant of atypical meningioma (International Classification of Diseases for Oncology Code 1 and WHO Grade II) that was first reported in 1988, 10 has been listed in the 2007 edition of the WHO tumor classification system. 14 Most

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Clear cell meningioma causing Castleman syndrome in a child

Case report

Takashi Sato, Takeshi Sugiyama, Tomoyuki Kawataki, Eiji Sato, Toru Horikoshi, Kanji Sugita, and Hiroyuki Kinouchi

syndrome is a systemic inflammatory disease similar to Castleman disease but attributed to disorders other than lymph node hyperplasia. 5 Most patients with Castleman syndrome have Kaposi sarcoma 7 , 20 or brain meningioma. 1–3 , 6 , 8 , 10–12 , 14–17 Since the initial case of Castleman syndrome caused by intracranial meningioma was reported in 1980, 6 14 further cases caused by meningioma have been described. 1 , 4 , 10 , 11 , 14–17 Most of these tumors were chordoid meningioma characterized by histological finding of chordoma-like appearance with lymphoplasma cell