Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 38 items for :

  • "trigeminal neuralgia" x
  • Journal of Neurosurgery: Case Lessons x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All
Open access

Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to osteoma and vascular compression: illustrative case

Chenglong Cao, Mingwu Li, Min Wu, and Xiaofeng Jiang

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is an typical condition characterized by neuropathic facial pain. Its prevalence is between 4 to 13 cases per 100,000 persons, primarily affecting individuals above the age of 50 years. 1 , 2 Updated diagnostic categories have been proposed. 3 , 4 Classic TN requires confirmation of morphological changes in the trigeminal nerve root resulting from vascular compression. Secondary TN is due to an identifiable underlying neurological disease. The most common factors contributing to secondary TN are tumors (such as meningiomas

Open access

Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to vascular compression and neurocysticercosis: illustrative case

Mao Vásquez, Luis J. Saavedra, Hector H. García, Evelyn Vela, Jorge E. Medina, Miguel Lozano, Carlos Hoyos, and William W. Lines-Aguilar

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is the most common type of facial pain, negatively affecting quality of life and work capacity in 34% of patients. 1 TN has a prevalence of 4–13 cases per 100,000 inhabitants 1–3 and generally affects patients older than 50 years, with a female-to-male ratio of 1.5 to 1. In primary (classic) TN, compression by vascular loops is found at the entrance of the trigeminal nerve to the brainstem. 4 , 5 In secondary TN, 6 , 7 extrinsic compression of the trigeminal nerve triggers the pain. The most common causes of extrinsic TN are

Open access

Anesthesia-induced Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in trigeminal neuralgia: illustrative case

Guido Mazzaglia, Giulio Bonomo, Emanuele Rubiu, Paolo Murabito, Alessia Amato, Paolo Ferroli, and Marco Gemma

, trigeminal neuralgia is linked with sudden pain and prolonged suffering that may provoke a physical and psychological stress response. In this paper, we present a case of TS that manifested during induction of anesthesia to perform a surgical microvascular decompression (MVD) of the left trigeminal nerve in a patient with trigeminal neuralgia. We expose the peculiar clinical picture and discuss the possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Illustrative Case We present a case of a 50-year-old female patient scheduled for an MVD who presented immediately

Open access

Small vestibular schwannoma presented with trigeminal neuralgia: illustrative case

Keisuke Onoda, Yoshifumi Ogasawara, Yu Hirokawa, Ryohei Sashida, Ren Fujiwara, Tomihiro Wakamiya, Yuhei Michiwaki, Tatsuya Tanaka, Kazuaki Shimoji, Eiichi Suehiro, Fumitaka Yamane, Masatou Kawashima, and Akira Matsuno

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a paroxysmal electric shock pain on one side of the face triggered by washing the face, eating, and speaking and is often caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve. 1 TN can also be caused by compression of the trigeminal nerve by a tumor of the cerebellar pontine angle, but this is relatively rare. 2 Epidermoid is the most commonly found cerebellar pontine angle tumor causing TN, and vestibular schwannomas (VSs) are relatively uncommon, 2 occurring in only about 1.2%–3.3% of VSs. 3–5 There are 2 etiologies

Open access

Trigeminal neuralgia induced by brainstem infarction treated with pontine descending tractotomy: illustrative case

Rachyl M. Shanker, Miri Kim, Chloe Verducci, Elhaum G. Rezaii, Kerry Steed, Atul K. Mallik, and Douglas E. Anderson

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) most commonly presents as neuropathic pain secondary to neurovascular compression (NVC) at the nerve root entry zone (NREZ) 1 , 2 or as a result of a space-occupying lesion impacting the trigeminal nerve. 3 However, there exists a subset of patients in whom trigeminal pain is induced by brainstem ischemia, interrupting the NREZ, spinal trigeminal nucleus, or descending spinal trigeminal tract (SpTV). While cases of TN induced by a brainstem infarct have been reported, there are no clear treatment recommendations for this

Open access

Radiofrequency thermocoagulation for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia associated with a focal pontine lesion: illustrative case

Vadym Biloshytsky, Anna Skorokhoda, Inna Buvailo, and Maryna Biloshytska

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a debilitating neurological condition with brief attacks of facial pain restricted to the trigeminal distribution and with an electric shock-like shooting, stabbing, or sharp quality. TN-associated pain is one of the most severe pains known, often referred to as “suicidal,” and is triggered by innocuous stimulation of the face and intraoral mucosa such as touching the face, talking, chewing, drinking, washing the face, shaving, etc. 1 , 2 TN etiology can be classified as classic, secondary, or idiopathic. The classic type

Open access

Simultaneous microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm involving a dolichoectatic vertebral artery in an elderly patient: illustrative case

Neelan J. Marianayagam, Hanya M. Qureshi, Sagar Vasandani, Shaurey Vetsa, Muhammad Jalal, Kun Wu, and Jennifer Moliterno

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and hemifacial spasm (HFS) refractory to medical management can commonly be the result of direct contact by an aberrant vessel compressing the root entry zone (REZ) of the trigeminal and facial nerves, respectively. Microvascular decompression (MVD) has been shown to provide lasting relief. 1 In TN, the offending vessel is usually the superior cerebellar artery, whereas in HFS, it is usually the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. There are instances, however, in which an enlarged or dolichoectatic vertebral artery (DVA) can be the

Open access

Intraoperative application of indocyanine green and temporary venous occlusion test to assess collateral flow during microvascular decompression for venous-related trigeminal neuralgia: illustrative case

Kentaro Fujimoto, Yosuke Akamatsu, Yasumasa Nishikawa, and Kuniaki Ogasawara

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is caused by various types of compression from offending vessels, including arteries, veins, and nonvascular structures 1–4 such as venous angiomas or thickened arachnoids. 5 , 6 Of these, the involvement of the superior petrosal vein (SPV) and its branches in the etiology of TN has been reported in up to 15% of the cases, suggesting that vein-related TN is relatively common. 3 , 7–10 Although transposition of the offending vein is desirable during microvascular decompression (MVD) for vein-related TN, sacrificing the offending

Open access

Trigeminal neuralgia caused by a persistent primitive trigeminal artery: preoperative three-dimensional multifusion imaging and computational fluid dynamics analysis. Illustrative case

Toru Satoh, Takao Yasuhara, Michiari Umakoshi, and Isao Date

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is mainly caused by compression of the trigeminal nerve by blood vessels at the site of neurovascular contact (NVC). 1 However, the detailed mechanism of its onset is unknown. The superior cerebellar artery (SCA), anterior inferior cerebellar artery, and basilar artery and veins are responsible for this condition. TN caused by the persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) and its variants is extremely rare, accounting for 0.2%–0.6% of TN cases. 2 , 3 Herein, we describe a case of TN in which the PTA trunk was fused with the SCA

Open access

Bipolar, high-voltage, long-duration pulsed radiofrequency ablation of the Gasserian ganglion for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia in a patient with a cardiac implantable electronic device: illustrative case

Albert A Sufianov, Nargiza A Garifullina, Andrey G Shapkin, Egor S Markin, Matias Baldoncini, Luis A. B Borba, Manuel J Encarnacion Ramirez, and Rinat A Sufianov

Patients with drug-resistant forms of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) are usually subjected to interventional neurosurgical procedures. 1 Despite the gold-standard treatment of microvascular decompression (MVD), a great deal of attention is given to percutaneous procedures. 2–5 Nowadays, an alternative percutaneous treatment for TN gaining scientific support is high-voltage, long-duration pulsed radiofrequency therapy (PRFT) of the Gasserian ganglion (GG) because of its neuromodulation effect with minimal risk of thermal neuronal damage. 6 PRFT is a novel and