Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • "trigeminal neuralgia" x
  • Journal of Neurosurgery: Case Lessons x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All
Open access

Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to osteoma and vascular compression: illustrative case

Chenglong Cao, Mingwu Li, Min Wu, and Xiaofeng Jiang

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is an typical condition characterized by neuropathic facial pain. Its prevalence is between 4 to 13 cases per 100,000 persons, primarily affecting individuals above the age of 50 years. 1 , 2 Updated diagnostic categories have been proposed. 3 , 4 Classic TN requires confirmation of morphological changes in the trigeminal nerve root resulting from vascular compression. Secondary TN is due to an identifiable underlying neurological disease. The most common factors contributing to secondary TN are tumors (such as meningiomas

Open access

Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to vascular compression and neurocysticercosis: illustrative case

Mao Vásquez, Luis J. Saavedra, Hector H. García, Evelyn Vela, Jorge E. Medina, Miguel Lozano, Carlos Hoyos, and William W. Lines-Aguilar

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is the most common type of facial pain, negatively affecting quality of life and work capacity in 34% of patients. 1 TN has a prevalence of 4–13 cases per 100,000 inhabitants 1–3 and generally affects patients older than 50 years, with a female-to-male ratio of 1.5 to 1. In primary (classic) TN, compression by vascular loops is found at the entrance of the trigeminal nerve to the brainstem. 4 , 5 In secondary TN, 6 , 7 extrinsic compression of the trigeminal nerve triggers the pain. The most common causes of extrinsic TN are

Open access

Simultaneous microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm involving a dolichoectatic vertebral artery in an elderly patient: illustrative case

Neelan J. Marianayagam, Hanya M. Qureshi, Sagar Vasandani, Shaurey Vetsa, Muhammad Jalal, Kun Wu, and Jennifer Moliterno

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and hemifacial spasm (HFS) refractory to medical management can commonly be the result of direct contact by an aberrant vessel compressing the root entry zone (REZ) of the trigeminal and facial nerves, respectively. Microvascular decompression (MVD) has been shown to provide lasting relief. 1 In TN, the offending vessel is usually the superior cerebellar artery, whereas in HFS, it is usually the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. There are instances, however, in which an enlarged or dolichoectatic vertebral artery (DVA) can be the

Open access

White epidermoid cyst transformation after stereotactic radiosurgery: illustrative case

Hideki Matsumoto, Yuki Shinya, Satoru Miyawaki, Masahiro Shin, Satoshi Koizumi, Daisuke Sato, Munetoshi Hinata, Masako Ikemura, Satoshi Kiyofuji, Taich Kin, Mototaro Iwanaga, Masahiro Shimizu, Hirofumi Nakatomi, and Nobuhito Saito

epidermoid cysts composed of keratin and cholesterol crystals. 2 A case of typical epidermoid cysts transformed into WECs has been reported previously. 3 However, none of those prior reports discussed the potential contribution of radiation. In the present report, we present a case of a WEC transformed from histologically confirmed typical epidermoid cysts 14 years after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Illustrative Case History, Examination, and Imaging A 55-year-old man presented with left trigeminal neuralgia (TN), and radiological examinations revealed a

Open access

Microvascular decompression for developmental venous anomaly causing hemifacial spasm: illustrative case

Margaret Tugend and Raymond F Sekula Jr.

DVA or a decrease in outflow from the DVA. Symptoms from flow-related causes include headache, neurological deficit, seizures, and coma secondary to hemorrhage or infarction. Mechanical causes include obstructive hydrocephalus and nerve compression, causing trigeminal neuralgia and HFS. Cases with symptoms attributed to DVA, such as headache, but with no identifiable patho-mechanism, are classified as idiopathic. 5 Here, we present an example of mechanical compression of the facial nerve by a pontine DVA ostensibly causing HFS. Although the patient ultimately had a