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Pterygoid venous plexus anastomosis in trigeminal percutaneous glycerol rhizotomy: illustrative case

Kevin Cordeiro, Jason Kim, Niall Buckley, Mark Kraemer, Conrad Pun, and Daniel Resnick

Percutaneous glycerol rhizotomy (PGR) is a safe and effective treatment for medication-refractory trigeminal neuralgia, 1 , 2 although it may lead to trigeminal distribution sensory loss. 3 , 4 Computed tomography (CT)-guided PGR has been shown to improve procedural efficiency, reduce operator radiation exposure, and allow definitive needle placement within the foramen ovale. 5 In addition to the foramen ovale, CT guidance allows the visualization of key skull base anatomy, such as the infratemporal fossa. 5 The infratemporal fossa houses the pterygoid

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Middle meningeal artery pseudoaneurysm and pterygoid plexus fistula following percutaneous radiofrequency rhizotomy: illustrative case

Rahim Ismail, Derrek Schartz, Timothy Hoang, and Alexander Kessler

The percutaneous approach to the trigeminal nerve via the foramen ovale originated in the early 20th century from Taptas and Hartel in 1911 and 1913, 1 respectively, with electrocoagulation developed by Rethi in 1913. 2 Over the subsequent century, much advancement in the percutaneous techniques has occurred including chemodenervation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, nerve blocks, Botox injections, nerve stimulation, and balloon decompression. 2 Percutaneous treatment for trigeminal neuralgia is generally considered a well-tolerated procedure, with

Open access

Utilization of three-dimensional fusion images with high-resolution computed tomography angiography for preoperative evaluation of microvascular decompression: patient series

Takamitsu Iwata, Koichi Hosomi, Naoki Tani, Hui Ming Khoo, Satoru Oshino, and Haruhiko Kishima

Neurovascular compression syndromes, such as trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm, and glossopharyngeal neuralgia, are abnormal conditions that can substantially affect the quality of life of patients. 1–3 Microvascular decompression (MVD) is an effective surgical treatment for drug-resistant cases. 1–4 The overall success rate of MVD varies from 73% to 90%, and the most common complications include hearing loss, facial weakness or numbness, and cerebrospinal fluid leakage. 3 , 5 However, the success of MVD depends on accurate preoperative imaging and