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Development of an iPhone application for sideline concussion testing

Guillaume A. Curaudeau, Nikhil Sharma, and Richard A. Rovin

paper SCAT2 survey is inconvenient to use on the sideline (especially when the weather turns foul), and dissemination of test data is more difficult. A digital format, particularly a smart-phone application, breaches these barriers. In this paper, we report our experience with the development of an iPhone app for concussion testing. Methods The app development team included a neurosurgeon (R.A.R.) to provide the medically relevant content, a graphic artist (G.A.C.) to design the user interface, and a computer programmer (N.S.) to translate the vision into the

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Letter to the Editor. Alternative to the operating microscope

Kanwaljeet Garg and Manmohan Singh

visualize what the primary surgeon is looking at while doing certain surgical steps. Disclosures The authors report no conflict of interest. References 1 Siller S , Zoellner C , Fuetsch M , A high-definition 3D exoscope as an alternative to the operating microscope in spinal microsurgery . J Neurosurg Spine . Published online July 10, 2020. doi:10.3171/2020.4.SPINE20374 32650307 2 Cenzato M , Fratianni A , Stefini R . Using a smartphone as an exoscope where an operating microscope is not available . World Neurosurg . 2019 ; 132 : 114 – 117 . 10

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Letter to the Editor. Alternative to the operating microscope

Kanwaljeet Garg and Manmohan Singh

visualize what the primary surgeon is looking at while doing certain surgical steps. Disclosures The authors report no conflict of interest. References 1 Siller S , Zoellner C , Fuetsch M , A high-definition 3D exoscope as an alternative to the operating microscope in spinal microsurgery . J Neurosurg Spine . Published online July 10, 2020. doi:10.3171/2020.4.SPINE20374 2 Cenzato M , Fratianni A , Stefini R . Using a smartphone as an exoscope where an operating microscope is not available . World Neurosurg . 2019 ; 132 : 114 – 117 . 10.1016/j

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Ventriculostomy-associated hemorrhage: a risk assessment by radiographic simulation

Faith C. Robertson, Muhammad M. Abd-El-Barr, Srinivasan Mukundan Jr., and William B. Gormley

was compared with the freehand pass technique, the Ghajar Guide tended to permit accurate ventricle placement in fewer attempts, although there was no statistically significant difference between the two techniques. 15 Since then, endoscopy, ultrasonography, and neuronavigation are being increasingly used in selected cases. A recent nationwide survey revealed that more than half of neurosurgeons and neurosurgical residents in the US prefer to use image-guided techniques, 18 and recent trials are aiming to use smartphone technology in conjunction with MRI and CT

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Letter to the Editor. Minimally invasive techniques: the new frontier in neurosurgery

Nícollas Nunes Rabelo, Bruno Braga Sisnando da Costa, Manoel Jacobsen Teixeira, and Eberval Gadelha Figueiredo

– 405 , 2005 15794836 5 Figueiredo EG , Deshmukh P , Zabramski JM , Preul MC , Crawford NR , Spetzler RF : The pterional-transsylvian approach: an analytical study . Neurosurgery 62 ( 6 Suppl 3 ): 1361 – 1367 , 2008 18695556 10.1227/01.NEU.0000333801.51962.2F 6 Mandel M , Petito CE , Tutihashi R , Paiva W , Abramovicz Mandel S , Gomes Pinto FC , : Smartphone-assisted minimally invasive neurosurgery . J Neurosurg [epub ahead of print March 13, 2018; DOI: 10.3171/2017.6.JNS1712] 29529913 10.1227/01.neu.0000303978.11752.45 7

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Letter to the Editor. Simplifying the use of prognostic information in patients with traumatic brain injury

Davi J. Fontoura Solla, Manoel Jacobsen Teixeira, and Wellingson Silva Paiva

-9 8896134 4 Murray GD , Brennan PM , Teasdale GM : Simplifying the use of prognostic information in traumatic brain injury. Part 2: Graphical presentation of probabilities . J Neurosurg 128 : 1621 – 1634 , 2018 10.3171/2017.12.JNS172782 29631517 5 Zaki M , Drazin D : Smartphone use in neurosurgery? APP-solutely! Surg Neurol Int 5 : 113 , 2014 10.4103/2152-7806.137534 25101208

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Challenges and prospects of neurosurgical teleconsultations in a developing country: a reality check

Narendra Kumar, Varidh Katiyar, Kokkula Praneeth, Ravi Sharma, Priya Narwal, Amol Raheja, Vivek Tandon, Shashwat Mishra, Kanwaljeet Garg, Ashish Suri, P. Sarat Chandra, and Shashank S. Kale

truncated outpatient services across the country. This further aggravated the problems of our neurosurgical patients, necessitating the adoption of telemedicine services for outpatient consultations for the first time. 1 – 4 In our earlier paper, we showed that telemedicine was a viable alternative to in-person visits during the COVID-19 pandemic for a select group of neurosurgical patients. 5 Based on our initial experience, we realized that a sizable patient population of a developing country such as India now has access to smartphones and the internet. Hence, we

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Systematic review of telemedicine in spine surgery

John Paul G. Kolcun, Won Hyung A. Ryu, and Vincent C. Traynelis

& UL1 TR000448 Debono et al., 2016 12 European Spine Journal France NR Dicianno et al., 2016 17 American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation USA NIDILRR grant 90DP5004-01-00 (RERC from Cloud to Smartphone: Empowering & Accessible ICT), grant 0DP0064-01-00 (DRRP promoting independence & self-management using mHealth), & grant 90RE5004-01-00 (RERC on telerehabilitation), Verizon Foundation, & NIH grants 1R21HD071810-01A1 & 5T35AT005933-02 Felbaum et al., 2018 13 Operative Neurosurgery USA NR Hou et al., 2019 18 Journal of Medical Internet Research mHealth

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“Houston, we have a problem”: the difficulty of measuring outcomes in spinal surgery

Gregory W. Basil, Annelise C. Sprau, Zoher Ghogawala, Jang W. Yoon, and Michael Y. Wang

-alone accelerometers, but conveniently, this technology already exists in almost every smartphone on the market. This is essentially the “Holy Grail” of research—accurate measurement of a meaningful variable with no intervention, no additional resource investment, and a massive and unbiased database. The further development of such technologies will help us to answer important questions regarding the temporal and gradient components of recovery. In other words, when do our patients recover, and by how much? A component of this analysis will require a careful consideration of what

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Family-acquired photographs for the evaluation of pediatric head shape via telemedicine: an analysis of photograph quality

Mitch R. Paro, William A. Lambert, Nathan K. Leclair, Arijit R. Chakraborty, Sophia Angelo, Benjamin Pesante, Petronella Stoltz, Jonathan E. Martin, Markus J. Bookland, and David S. Hersh

taking the picture also tended to produce poor lighting and reduce orthogonality. Additionally, the portrait mode setting, available on some smartphone cameras, increases the contrast between the object of focus and the environment and was used to good effect by some families in our series. To our knowledge, this is the first reported analysis of family-acquired photographs obtained for the evaluation of pediatric head shape, although other studies have reported the utility of medical photographs within other domains of neurosurgery. Pirris et al., for example