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Complications of endoscopic third ventriculostomy

Henry W. S. Schroeder, Wulf-Rüdiger Niendorf, and Michael R. Gaab

achieved in cases in which the hydrocephalus was caused by tumors. Postoperative MR images or CT scans were obtained after 178 procedures. In 10 cases, the ventricles appeared larger (6%), in 100 cases smaller (56%), and in 68 cases unchanged (38%). Discussion Endoscopic third ventriculostomy has generally been accepted as the procedure of choice for the treatment of non-communicating hydrocephalus. This procedure is considered to be simple, fast, and safe. Data from several series of patients undergoing ETV have been published; 4, 12, 18, 27, 28, 40, 65, 76

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Role of endoscopic third ventriculostomy at infected cerebrospinal fluid shunt removal

Clinical article

Tomohisa Shimizu, Mark G. Luciano, and Toru Fukuhara

interpretation of data: Fukuhara. Drafting the article: Shimizu, Fukuhara. Critically revising the article: all authors. Reviewed submitted version of manuscript: all authors. Approved the final version of the manuscript on behalf of all authors: Luciano. Statistical analysis: Fukuhara. Study supervision: Luciano. References 1 Elgamal EA : Continuous monitoring of intracranial pressure after endoscopic third ventriculostomy in the management of CSF shunt failure . Minim Invasive Neurosurg 53 : 49 – 54 , 2010 10.1055/s-0030-1249101 2 Erşahin Y , Arslan D

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Complications of endoscopic third ventriculostomy

A review

Triantafyllos Bouras and Spyros Sgouros

E ndoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) has been advocated as the method of choice for the treatment of obstructive hydrocephalus of certain etiologies, among which aqueductal stenosis 17 and tumors of the posterior fossa and the fourth ventricle 31 , 32 are the principal ones. Furthermore, as experience grows, various studies suggest that ETV is at least as efficient as VP shunt placement, which is the main alternative treatment, in hydrocephalus of other causes, such as meningomyelocele-related hydrocephalus, posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus

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Endoscopic third ventriculostomy for obstructive hydrocephalus due to intracranial hemorrhage with intraventricular extension

Clinical article

Joachim M. K. Oertel, Yvonne Mondorf, Joerg Baldauf, Henry W. S. Schroeder, and Michael R. Gaab

the level of the posterior third ventricle, aqueduct, fourth ventricle, or foramen magnum. Only patients with intraventricular extension of the hemorrhage were included. The second inclusion criterion was an ETV performed for restoration of CSF circulation regardless of whether a simultaneous evacuation of intraventricular blood was done or not. Third ventriculostomy was only undertaken in those patients showing clinical deterioration most likely because of hydrocephalus or in those with EVD because they could not be weaned off the EVD system. All patients in whom

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Endoscopic third ventriculostomy in infants

Michael J. Fritsch, Sven Kienke, Tobias Ankermann, Maurizio Padoin, and H. Maximilian Mehdorn

T reatment of pediatric hydrocephalus is one of the most common clinical problems in neurosurgical practice. Placement of a VP shunt is still the standard for the surgical management of the disease; yet shunt infection and shunt failure are common problems. 7, 12, 14, 15 Shunt insertion during the 1st year of life has been found to be a significant predictor for future shunt failure. 20 Endoscopic third ventriculostomy presents an alternative to shunt insertion. According to published data from several groups, infants younger than 1 year of age have a

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Long-term resolution of acute, obstructive, triventricular hydrocephalus by endoscopic removal of a third ventricular hematoma without third ventriculostomy

Case report and review of the literature

Giuseppe M. V. Barbagallo, Nunzio Platania, and Claudio Schonauer

A lthough neuroendoscopy has progressively gained a well-established role in the neurosurgical repertoire for the treatment of several diseases, 8, 13, 14, 16, 17, 21, 23–25, 31, 32, 34, 37, 40 controversy surrounds the endoscopic management of ICH and IVH, because of the instruments currently available and related technical problems. Despite several reports both on hemorrhagic complications during intraventricular endoscopic procedures and on third ventriculostomy in patients with hydrocephalus caused by ICH or IVH, 1, 8–12, 19, 20, 23, 26, 30, 35–38, 40, 42

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Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage after endoscopic third ventriculostomy

Case report

Henry W. S. Schroeder, Rolf W. Warzok, Jamal A. Assaf, and Michael R. Gaab

W ith the increasing use of endoscopic techniques in neurosurgery, endoscopic third ventriculostomy has become a well-established procedure for the treatment of several forms of noncommunicating hydrocephalus. 1, 5, 6, 8 Third ventriculostomy is considered to be simple, fast, and safe. Complications have rarely been reported in the literature. 2–4, 7, 9, 10 We present a case in which the patient suffered a fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) after he underwent an endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Case Report This 63-year-old man presented with hearing loss

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Combined endoscopic third ventriculostomy and choroid plexus cauterization as primary treatment for infant hydrocephalus: a prospective North American series

Clinical article

Scellig S. D. Stone and Benjamin C. Warf

I n 2005, Warf first reported the technique and results of combining endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) with bilateral endoscopic lateral ventricle choroid plexus cauterization (CPC) to treat hydrocephalus in infants. 13 Subsequently, the efficacy of the procedure has been demonstrated among distinct etiologies of hydrocephalus in infants, with overall long-term success of more than 60% for all patients if the prepontine cistern is not obstructed by arachnoid scarring. 14 , 16–19 , 22 , 23 With the exception of 2 studies from US institutions of ETV

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Immediate resolution of tonsillar herniation and severe cervicothoracic syringomyelia after third ventriculostomy for hydrocephalus caused by a brainstem tumor

Case report

Ali I. Raja and Badih Adada

syrinx cavity after treatment of the condition's cause has been known to occur, 5 but complete resolution of a large syrinx over a short period of time has not been reported. We report the case of a patient who harbored a brainstem tumor accompanied by tonsillar herniation, hydrocephalus, and a large cervicothoracic syrinx. Immediate resolution of symptoms was noted after third ventriculostomy was performed. Case Report Examination This 15-year-old girl presented with headaches that progressively worsened over a 2-month period. Symptoms at presentation

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Third Ventriculostomy

Neurosurgical Forum: Letters to the editor To The Editor Stephen E. Natelson , M.D. Fort Sanders Neurosurgical Clinic Knoxville, Tennessee 890 891 The paper by Dr. Kelly (Kelly PJ: Stereotactic third ventriculostomy in patients with nontumoral adolescent/adult onset aqueductal stenosis and symptomatic hydrocephalus. J Neurosurg 75: 865–873, December, 1991) is an excellent article and makes a number of interesting points. To me, the most interesting point is that he feels that the existing shunt should be