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Chronic subdural hematoma in infancy

Clinical analysis of 30 cases in the CT era

Nobuhiko Aoki

C hronic subdural hematoma in infants has long been of interest to neurosurgeons. 9, 11, 13, 15 The routine treatment of this lesion has changed from wide excision of subdural membranes 11 to procedures directed toward eliminating intracranial hypertension. 13 The majority of reports on the pathology, etiology, and treatment of these lesions predate the era of computerized tomography (CT). A few authors 2, 6, 7, 12, 17 have studied the treatment of this condition based on CT scanning, which enables neurosurgeons to delineate the exact extent of the

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Experimental production of subdural hematomas

Ronald I. Apfelbaum, A. N. Guthkelch, and Kenneth Shulman

T he importance of trauma in the etiology of chronic subdural hematoma was recognized in 1914 by Trotter, 16 who conjectured that episodes of clinical deterioration were due to renewed hemorrhage from the torn veins that produced the hematoma. Putnam and Cushing 11 in 1925 agreed that rebleeding correlated with clinical deterioration, but thought it came from thin-walled sinusoidal blood vessels in the outer (dural) surface of the encapsulating membrane. This explanation was generally accepted until Gardner 4 in 1932 suggested that, following encapsulation

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Subdural Hematoma

Neurosurgical Forum: Letters to the Editor To The Editor Allan J. Drapkin , M.D. University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Neptune, New Jersey 169 170 Abstract Object. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of closed-system subdural drainage on repeated operation rates after burr hole evacuation of subacute and chronic subdural hematomas (SDHs). Methods. Five hundred consecutive operations for the treatment of SDH via burr holes were performed between January 1, 1996, and April 15

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Subdural Hematoma

, et al : Serum protein exudation in chronic subdural haematomas: a mechanism for haematoma enlargement? Acta Neurochir 140 : 161 – 166 , 1998 Fujisawa H, Nomura S, Tsuchida E, et al: Serum protein exudation in chronic subdural haematomas: a mechanism for haematoma enlargement? Acta Neurochir 140: 161–166, 1998 2. Nomura S , Kashiwagi S , Fujisawa H , et al : Characterization of local hyperfibrinolysis in chronic subdural hematomas by SDS-PAGE and immunoblot. J Neurosurg 81 : 910 – 913 , 1994

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Intracranial subdural hematoma following lumbar myelography

Case report

Saeid Alemohammad and William F. Bouzarth

: 684–686, 1974 10.1001/jama.1974.03230440042030 16. Moussa AH , Sharma SK : Subdural haematoma and the malfunctioning shunt. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 41 : 759 – 761 , 1978 Moussa AH, Sharma SK: Subdural haematoma and the malfunctioning shunt. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 41: 759–761, 1978 10.1136/jnnp.41.8.759 17. Rahme ES , Green D : Chronic subdural hematoma in adolescence and early adulthood. JAMA 176 : 424 – 426 , 1961 Rahme ES, Green D: Chronic subdural hematoma in

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Isodense subdural hematoma presenting with paraparesis

Case report

Christopher B. Shields, T. Bodley Stites, and Henry D. Garretson

alert and fully oriented patient. References 1. Amendola MA , Ostrum BJ : Diagnosis of isodense subdural hematomas by computed tomography. Am J Roentgenol 129 : 693 – 697 , 1977 Amendola MA, Ostrum BJ: Diagnosis of isodense subdural hematomas by computed tomography. Am J Roentgenol 129: 693–697, 1977 10.2214/ajr.129.4.693 2. Cameron MM : Chronic subdural haematoma: A review of 114 cases. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 41 : 834 – 839 , 1978 Cameron MM: Chronic subdural haematoma: A

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Experimental chronic subdural hematoma in mice

Gross morphology and light microscopic observations

Hisashi Aikawa and Kinuko Suzuki

: Chronic subdural haematomas , in Vinken PJ , Bruyn GW (eds): Injuries of the Brain and Skull, Part II. Handbook of Clinical Neurology , Vol 24 . Amsterdam : North-Holland , 1976 , pp 297 – 327 Loew F, Kivelitz R: Chronic subdural haematomas, in Vinken PJ, Bruyn GW (eds): Injuries of the Brain and Skull, Part II. Handbook of Clinical Neurology, Vol 24. Amsterdam: North-Holland, 1976, pp 297–327 23. Markwalder TM : Chronic subdural hematomas: a review. J Neurosurg 54 : 637 – 645 , 1981

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Subdural hematoma secondary to metastatic dural carcinomatosis

Case report

Richard W. Leech, F. Tod Welch, and George A. Ojemann

T rauma and diseases giving rise to a bleeding diathesis are well recognized as causes of subdural hematomas, and the histological appearances of subdural membranes excite little comment any more. But the presence of metastatic adenocarcinoma in bilateral subdural membranes, subsequently verified at autopsy, is sufficiently unusual to merit a review of the pathology, mode of development, and possible clinical significance of this special type of subdural hematoma. Case Report A 62-year-old woman entered the University Hospital with a 1-month history of

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Nonsurgical treatment of chronic subdural hematoma

Jiro Suzuki and Akira Takaku

C hronic subdural hematoma is one of the most common problems observed in neurosurgery. Response to surgery has been so satisfactory that this is generally considered the treatment of choice. We have successfully treated a series of 23 cases of chronic subdural hematomas during the past 3 years by a nonsurgical method based on the use of intravenous Mannitol, and have obtained angiographic evidence of the disappearance or marked reduction in the size of hematomas in 22. Rationale for Nonsurgical Treatment There have been two major methods for the

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The osmolality of subdural hematoma fluid

Bryce Weir

I n 1932, Gardner 3 published a hypothesis that sought to explain the latent interval between injury and the development of symptoms in subdural hematomas. He stated that there was a gradual increase in the size of the hematoma following the initial formation due to the accession of tissue fluid, particularly spinal fluid. He hypothesized that this fluid was drawn into the hemorrhagic cyst through the semipermeable arachnoid membrane and adjacent cyst wall by the osmotic tension of the blood proteins contained in the cyst. Zollinger and Gross 17 published a