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History of brain tumor surgery

Mark C. Preul

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Editorial. Ipsilateral hemiparesis and its history for neurosurgery: same side, wrong side

Mark C. Preul

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Introduction: A view of neurosurgery's legacy in technology

Charles J. Prestigiacomo and Mark C. Preul

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Letter to the Editor: Kernohan’s contributions to neurosurgery

Iraj Derakhshan

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Editorial. London 1935: the frontal lobe, insanity, and a brain surgery

Mark C. Preul and T. Forcht Dagi

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Aura of technology and the cutting edge: a history of lasers in neurosurgery

Robert W. Ryan, Robert F. Spetzler, and Mark C. Preul

In this historical review the authors examine the important developments that have led to the availability of laser energy to neurosurgeons as a unique and sometimes invaluable tool. They review the physical science behind the function of lasers, as well as how and when various lasers based on different lasing mediums were discovered. They also follow the close association between advances in laser technology and their application in biomedicine, from early laboratory experiments to the first clinical experiences. Because opinions on the appropriate role of lasers in neurosurgery vary widely, the historical basis for some of these views is explored. Initial enthusiasm for a technology that appears to have innate advantages for safe resections has often given way to the strict limitations and demands of the neurosurgical operating theater. However, numerous creative solutions to improve laser delivery, power, safety, and ergonomics demonstrate the important role that technological advances in related scientific fields continue to offer neurosurgery. Benefiting from the most recent developments in materials science, current CO2 laser delivery systems provide a useful addition to the neurosurgical armamentarium when applied in the correct circumstances and reflect the important historical advances that come about from the interplay between neurosurgery and technology.

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Introduction: (In)famous neurological injuries and disease: cases and events of historical, political, cultural, and scientific impact: Part 2

James T. Goodrich, Mark C. Preul, and Chris A. Sloffer

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Introduction: (In)famous neurological injuries and disease: cases and events of historical, political, cultural, and scientific impact

Mark C. Preul, Chris A. Sloffer, and James T. Goodrich

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Introduction. Cerebral localization

Mark C. Preul, Charles Prestigiacomo, T. Forcht Dagi, and Javier Fandino

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Endogenous stem cell proliferation after central nervous system injury: alternative therapeutic options

Nicholas C. Bambakidis, Nicholas Theodore, Peter Nakaji, Adrian Harvey, Volker K. H. Sonntag, Mark C. Preul, and Robert H. Miller

The continuous regeneration of glial cells arising from endogenous stem cell populations in the central nervous system (CNS) occurs throughout life in mammals. In the ongoing research to apply stem cell therapy to neurological diseases, the capacity to harness the multipotential ability of endogenous stem cell populations has become apparent. Such cell populations proliferate in response to a variety of injury states in the CNS, but in the absence of a supportive microenvironment they contribute little to any significant behavioral recovery. In the authors' laboratory and elsewhere, recent research on the regenerative potential of these stem cells in disease states such as spinal cord injury has demonstrated that the cells' proliferative potential may be greatly upregulated in response to appropriate growth signals and exogenously applied trophic factors. Further understanding of the potential of such multipotent cells and the mechanisms responsible for creating a favorable microenvironment for them may lead to additional therapeutic alternatives in the setting of neurological diseases. These therapies would require no exogenous stem cell sources and thus would avoid the ethical and moral considerations regarding their use. In this review the authors provide a brief overview of the enhancement of endogenous stem cell proliferation following neurological insult.