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A long-term evaluation of a training program on breaking bad news in pediatric neurosurgery: a pilot study

Marc Zanello, Thomas Baugnon, Alexandre Roux, and Federico Di Rocco

OBJECTIVE

Breaking bad news is a difficult task in medical practice. Several breaking-bad-news training programs have been proposed. However, long-term results of such training have rarely been investigated. The aim of this study was to compare the short- and long-term evaluations by young neurosurgeons of a training program for breaking bad news to patients and their parents.

METHODS

Between 2012 and 2015, pediatric neurosurgery residents participated in a training day on breaking bad news in pediatric neurosurgery with professional actors. A personal debriefing, followed by a theoretical session, completed the training. Immediate feedback was evaluated through a survey administered at the end of the day. Long-term results were explored via an online form sent at least 3 years after the training completion.

RESULTS

Seventeen participants from 9 different countries were interviewed. Their immediate feedback confirmed their interest. For 71% of them, the program was very interesting, and 77% were extremely satisfied or very satisfied. All trainees wanted more training sessions. At a mean of 4.5 years of follow-up (range 3–6 years), 71% of the trainees fully remembered the session. Most of them (86%) reported a positive impact of the training on their career. Only 21% had another training session on breaking bad news during their residency. At long-term analysis, fewer trainees considered the duration of the training to have been sufficient (p = 0.044).

CONCLUSIONS

Breaking-bad-news training has a positive long-term educational impact even several years later. Such a training program should be implemented into pediatric neurosurgery residency.

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Toward a transitional care from childhood and adolescence to adulthood in surgical neurooncology? A lesson from the Necker-Enfants Malades and the Sainte-Anne Hospitals collaboration

Alexandre Roux, Kévin Beccaria, Thomas Blauwblomme, Nizar Mahlaoui, Fabrice Chretien, Pascale Varlet, Stéphanie Puget, and Johan Pallud

OBJECTIVE

Transitional care in surgical neurooncology is poorly studied. However, this period is pivotal, since it allows the patient to be empowered in his or her disease management. Here, the authors describe the experience of the Necker-Enfants Malades and the Sainte-Anne Hospital collaboration.

METHODS

The mixed transitional consultations started in September 2019 in a dedicated space for transitional care, named the “La Suite” department, located in the Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital, Paris, France. The authors organized planned consultations to schedule the clinical and radiological follow-up in the adult neurosurgical department but also emergency consultations to manage tumor recurrence in young adult patients. Transitional care was performed jointly by pediatric and adult neurosurgeons who have developed clinical and research skills in the field of surgical neurooncology. Neuropathological analysis was performed by a neuropathologist who is specialized in pediatric and adult neurooncology.

RESULTS

Fourteen patients benefited from a mixed transitional consultation. All of them accepted to start their management in an adult neurosurgical environment. Eleven patients (78.6%) for whom the disease was controlled benefited from a planned consultation. Three patients (21.4%) required rapid neurosurgical management for a tumor recurrence (n = 2) or for a new primary CNS tumor (n = 1) and benefited from an emergency consultation.

CONCLUSIONS

For adult patients harboring a brain tumor during childhood or adolescence, the authors suggest that neurosurgeons specialized in adult surgical neurooncology with a full knowledge in pediatric neurooncology will combine the required skills to optimize care management for these patients within a dedicated multidisciplinary organization framework.

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Toward a transitional care from childhood and adolescence to adulthood in surgical neurooncology? A lesson from the Necker-Enfants Malades and the Sainte-Anne Hospitals collaboration

Alexandre Roux, Kévin Beccaria, Thomas Blauwblomme, Nizar Mahlaoui, Fabrice Chretien, Pascale Varlet, Stéphanie Puget, and Johan Pallud

OBJECTIVE

Transitional care in surgical neurooncology is poorly studied. However, this period is pivotal, since it allows the patient to be empowered in his or her disease management. Here, the authors describe the experience of the Necker-Enfants Malades and the Sainte-Anne Hospital collaboration.

METHODS

The mixed transitional consultations started in September 2019 in a dedicated space for transitional care, named the “La Suite” department, located in the Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital, Paris, France. The authors organized planned consultations to schedule the clinical and radiological follow-up in the adult neurosurgical department but also emergency consultations to manage tumor recurrence in young adult patients. Transitional care was performed jointly by pediatric and adult neurosurgeons who have developed clinical and research skills in the field of surgical neurooncology. Neuropathological analysis was performed by a neuropathologist who is specialized in pediatric and adult neurooncology.

RESULTS

Fourteen patients benefited from a mixed transitional consultation. All of them accepted to start their management in an adult neurosurgical environment. Eleven patients (78.6%) for whom the disease was controlled benefited from a planned consultation. Three patients (21.4%) required rapid neurosurgical management for a tumor recurrence (n = 2) or for a new primary CNS tumor (n = 1) and benefited from an emergency consultation.

CONCLUSIONS

For adult patients harboring a brain tumor during childhood or adolescence, the authors suggest that neurosurgeons specialized in adult surgical neurooncology with a full knowledge in pediatric neurooncology will combine the required skills to optimize care management for these patients within a dedicated multidisciplinary organization framework.