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Penny K. Sneed, Joe Mendez, Johanna G. M. Vemer-van den Hoek, Zachary A. Seymour, Lijun Ma, Annette M. Molinaro, Shannon E. Fogh, Jean L. Nakamura, and Michael W. McDermott

OBJECT

The authors sought to determine the incidence, time course, and risk factors for overall adverse radiation effect (ARE) and symptomatic ARE after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases.

METHODS

All cases of brain metastases treated from 1998 through 2009 with Gamma Knife SRS at UCSF were considered. Cases with less than 3 months of follow-up imaging, a gap of more than 8 months in imaging during the 1st year, or inadequate imaging availability were excluded. Brain scans and pathology reports were reviewed to ensure consistent scoring of dates of ARE, treatment failure, or both; in case of uncertainty, the cause of lesion worsening was scored as indeterminate. Cumulative incidence of ARE and failure were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method with censoring at last imaging. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed.

RESULTS

Among 435 patients and 2200 brain metastases evaluable, the median patient survival time was 17.4 months and the median lesion imaging follow-up was 9.9 months. Calculated on the basis of 2200 evaluable lesions, the rates of treatment failure, ARE, concurrent failure and ARE, and lesion worsening with indeterminate cause were 9.2%, 5.4%, 1.4%, and 4.1%, respectively. Among 118 cases of ARE, approximately 60% were symptomatic and 85% occurred 3–18 months after SRS (median 7.2 months). For 99 ARE cases managed without surgery or bevacizumab, the probabilities of improvement observed on imaging were 40%, 57%, and 76% at 6, 12, and 18 months after onset of ARE. The most important risk factors for ARE included prior SRS to the same lesion (with 20% 1-year risk of symptomatic ARE vs 3%, 4%, and 8% for no prior treatment, prior whole brain radiotherapy [WBRT], or concurrent WBRT) and any of these volume parameters: target, prescription isodose, 12-Gy, or 10-Gy volume. Excluding lesions treated with repeat SRS, the 1-year probabilities of ARE were < 1%, 1%, 3%, 10%, and 14% for maximum diameter 0.3–0.6 cm, 0.7–1.0 cm, 1.1–1.5 cm, 1.6–2.0 cm, and 2.1–5.1 cm, respectively. The 1-year probabilities of symptomatic ARE leveled off at 13%–14% for brain metastases maximum diameter > 2.1 cm, target volume > 1.2 cm3, prescription isodose volume > 1.8 cm3,12-Gy volume > 3.3 cm3, and 10-Gy volume > 4.3 cm3, excluding lesions treated with repeat SRS. On both univariate and multivariate analysis, capecitabine, but not other systemic therapy within 1 month of SRS, appeared to increase ARE risk. For the multivariate analysis considering only metastases with target volume > 1.0 cm3, risk factors for ARE included prior SRS, kidney primary tumor, connective tissue disorder, and capecitabine.

CONCLUSIONS

Although incidence of ARE after SRS was low overall, risk increased rapidly with size and volume, leveling off at a 1-year cumulative incidence of 13%–14%. This study describes the time course of ARE and provides risk estimates by various lesion characteristics and treatment parameters to aid in decision-making and patient counseling.

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Martina Descovich, Penny K. Sneed, Nicholas M. Barbaro, Michael W. McDermott, Cynthia F. Chuang, Igor J. Barani, Jean L. Nakamura, and Lijun Ma

Object

The Leksell Gamma Knife and the Accuray CyberKnife systems have been used in the radiosurgical treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. The 2 techniques use different delivery methods and different treatment parameters. In the past, CyberKnife treatments have been associated with an increased incidence of treatment-related complications, such as facial numbness. The goal of this study was to develop a method for planning a CyberKnife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia that would reproduce the dosimetric characteristics of a Gamma Knife plan. A comparison between Gamma Knife and CyberKnife treatment plans obtained with this method is presented.

Methods

Five patients treated using the Gamma Knife Perfexion Unit were selected for this study. All patients underwent CT cisternography to accurately identify the position of the trigeminal nerve. The Gamma Knife plans used either one 4-mm-diameter collimator or two coincident 4-mm collimators (one open and one with sector blocking) placed at identical isocenter coordinates. A maximum local dose of 80 Gy was prescribed. Critical structures and representative isodose lines were outlined in GammaPlan and exported to the CyberKnife treatment planning platform. CyberKnife treatments were developed using the 5-mm-diameter cone and the trigeminal node set, which provides an effective collimation diameter of 4 mm at the isocenter. The 60-Gy isodose volume imported from GammaPlan was used as the target in the CyberKnife plans. The CyberKnife treatments were optimized to achieve target dose and critical structure sparing similar to the Gamma Knife plans. Isocentric and nonisocentric delivery techniques were investigated. Treatment plans were compared in terms of dosimetric characteristics, delivery, and planning efficiency.

Results

CyberKnife treatments using the 5-mm cone and the trigeminal node set can closely reproduce the dose distribution of Gamma Knife plans. CyberKnife isocentric and nonisocentric plans provide comparable results. The average length of the trigeminal nerve receiving a dose of 60 Gy was 4.5, 4.5, and 4.4 mm for Gamma Knife, nonisocentric CyberKnife, and isocentric CyberKnife, respectively. However, minimizing the dose to the critical structures was more difficult with the CyberKnife and required the use of tuning structures. In addition, the dose falloff away from the target was steeper in Gamma Knife plans, probably due to the larger number of beams (192 beams for Perfexion vs ~ 100 beams for CyberKnife). While the treatment time with the CyberKnife is generally shorter, the planning time is significantly longer.

Conclusions

CyberKnife radiosurgical parameters can be optimized to mimic the dose distribution of Gamma Knife plans. However, Gamma Knife plans result in superior sparing of critical structures (brainstem, temporal lobe, and cranial nerves VII and VIII) and in steeper dose falloff away from the target. The clinical significance of these effects is unknown.

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Orin Bloch, Seunggu J. Han, Soonmee Cha, Matthew Z. Sun, Manish K. Aghi, Michael W. McDermott, Mitchel S. Berger, and Andrew T. Parsa

Object

Extent of resection (EOR) has been shown to be an important prognostic factor for survival in patients undergoing initial resection of glioblastoma (GBM), but the significance of EOR at repeat craniotomy for recurrence remains unclear. In this study the authors investigate the impact of EOR at initial and repeat resection of GBM on overall survival.

Methods

Medical records were reviewed for all patients undergoing craniotomy for GBM at the University of California San Francisco Medical Center from January 1, 2005, through August 15, 2009. Patients who had a second craniotomy for pathologically confirmed recurrence following radiation and chemotherapy were evaluated. Volumetric EOR was measured and classified as gross-total resection (GTR, > 95% by volume) or subtotal resection (STR, ≤ 95% by volume) after independent radiological review. Overall survival was compared between groups using univariate and multivariate analysis accounting for known prognostic factors, including age, eloquent location, Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS), and adjuvant therapies.

Results

Multiple resections were performed in 107 patients. Fifty-two patients had initial GTR, of whom 31 (60%) had GTR at recurrence, with a median survival of 20.4 months (standard error [SE] 1.0 months), and 21 (40%) had STR at recurrence, with a median survival of 18.4 months (SE 0.5 months) (difference not statistically significant). Initial STR was performed in 55 patients, of whom 26 (47%) had GTR at recurrence, with a median survival of 19.0 months (SE 1.2 months), and 29 (53%) had STR, with a median survival of 15.9 months (SE 1.2 months) (p = 0.004). A Cox proportional hazards model was constructed demonstrating that age (HR 1.03, p = 0.004), KPS score at recurrence (HR 2.4, p = 0.02), and EOR at repeat resection (HR 0.62, p = 0.02) were independent predictors of survival. Extent of initial resection was not a statistically significant factor (p = 0.13) when repeat EOR was included in the model, suggesting that GTR at second craniotomy could overcome the effect of an initial STR.

Conclusions

Extent of resection at recurrence is an important predictor of overall survival. If GTR is achieved at recurrence, overall survival is maximized regardless of initial EOR, suggesting that patients with initial STR may benefit from surgery with a GTR at recurrence.

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Stephen T. Magill, Ramin A. Morshed, Calixto-Hope G. Lucas, Manish K. Aghi, Philip V. Theodosopoulos, Mitchel S. Berger, Oreste de Divitiis, Domenico Solari, Paolo Cappabianca, Luigi M. Cavallo, and Michael W. McDermott

OBJECTIVE

Tuberculum sellae meningiomas (TSMs) are surgically challenging tumors that can severely impair vision. Debate exists regarding whether the transcranial (TC) or endoscopic transsphenoidal (TS) approach is best for resecting these tumors, and there are few large series comparing these approaches.

METHODS

A retrospective chart review was performed at 2 academic centers comparing TC and TS approaches with respect to vision, extent of resection, recurrence, and complications. The authors report surgical outcomes and propose a simple preoperative tumor grading scale that scores tumor size (1–2), optic canal invasion (0–2), and arterial encasement (0–2). The authors performed univariate, multivariate, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) to evaluate outcomes.

RESULTS

The TSMs were resected in 139 patients. The median follow-up was 29 months. Ninety-five (68%) cases were resected via a TC and 44 (32%) via a TS approach. Tumors treated via a TC approach had a higher tumor (p = 0.0007), artery (p < 0.0001), and total score (p = 0.0012) on the grading scale. Preoperative visual deficits were present in 87% of patients. Vision improved in 47%, stayed the same in 35%, declined in 10%, and was not recorded in 8%. The extent of resection was 65% gross-total resection, 23% near-total resection (95%–99% resection), and 12% subtotal resection (< 95%). A lower tumor score was significantly associated with better or stable vision postoperatively (p = 0.0052). The RPA confirmed low tumor score as the key predictor of postoperative visual improvement or stability. Multivariate analysis and RPA demonstrate that lower canal score (p < 0.0001) and TC approach (p = 0.0019) are associated with gross-total resection. Complications occurred in 20 (14%) patients, including CSF leak (5%) and infection (4%). There was no difference in overall complication rates between TC and TS approaches; however, the TS approach had more CSF leaks (OR 5.96, 95% CI 1.10–32.04). The observed recurrence rate was 10%, and there was no difference between the TC and TS approaches.

CONCLUSIONS

Tuberculum sellae meningiomas can be resected using either a TC or TS approach, with low morbidity and good visual outcomes in appropriately selected patients. The simple proposed grading scale provides a standard preoperative method to evaluate TSMs and can serve as a starting point for selection of the surgical approach. Higher scores were associated with worsened visual outcomes and subtotal resection, regardless of approach. The authors plan a multicenter review of this grading scale to further evaluate its utility.

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Justin S. Smith, Soonmee Cha, Mary Catherine Mayo, Michael W. McDermott, Andrew T. Parsa, Susan M. Chang, William P. Dillon, and Mitchel S. Berger

Object

Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is an invaluable tool in the diagnosis of acute stroke and other types of brain injury. Abnormalities in and around the resection cavity on diffusion-weighted imaging have been observed following surgery for infiltrating glioma. The purpose of this study was to investigate prospectively the incidence, time course, and ultimate outcome of these abnormalities.

Methods

Forty-four consecutive patients with newly diagnosed gliomas were prospectively observed using serial MR imaging including diffusion-weighted sequences. Clinical and surgical data were also collected. Immediately postoperatively neuroimaging identified 28 patients (64%) in whom areas of reduced diffusion appeared in or around the resection cavity (mean volume 8.2 ± 1.5 cm3). Complete resolution of this reduced diffusion was demonstrated within 90 days in 24 patients (86%). On subsequent neuroimages these areas demonstrated Gd enhancement as early as postoperative Day 15 and as late as Day 198 and ultimately took on the appearance of encephalomalacia in 26 (93%) of 28 cases. Postoperative reduced diffusion was not predicted by the clinical or surgical parameters that were assessed. No clinical deficits were attributable to the reduced diffusion.

Conclusions

An abnormality related to diffusion-weighted sequences on postoperative MR imaging can occur after resection of newly diagnosed gliomas. In this study the abnormality typically resolved and was replaced by contrast enhancement on follow-up imaging, ultimately demonstrating encephalomalacia on long-term follow up. Findings on neuroimaging during the period of enhancement could be confused with recurrent tumor and interpreted as early treatment failure. Based on the findings of this study the authors strongly suggest that the inclusion of diffusion-weighted sequences in postoperative MR imaging is essential, as is MR imaging immediately before radiation therapy to monitor disease progression. A new enhancement observed after glioma surgery should be interpreted in the context of the diffusion-weighted image obtained immediately postoperatively.

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Seunggu J. Han, Isaac Yang, Jose J. Otero, Brian J. Ahn, Tarik Tihan, Michael W. McDermott, Mitchel S. Berger, Susan M. Chang, and Andrew T. Parsa

Object

Gliosarcoma can arise secondarily, after conventional adjuvant treatment of high-grade glioma. The current literature on the occurrence of secondary gliosarcoma (SGS) after glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is limited, with only 12 reported cases. The authors present a large series of histologically confirmed SGSs, with follow-up to describe the clinical and radiological presentation, pathological diagnosis, and treatment outcomes.

Methods

Gliosarcoma cases were identified using the University of California, San Francisco's Departments of Neurological Surgery and Neuropathology databases. Through a retrospective chart review, cases of gliosarcoma were considered SGS if the following inclusion criteria were met: 1) the patient had a previously diagnosed intracranial malignant glioma that did not have gliosarcoma components; and 2) the histopathological tissue diagnosis of the recurrence confirmed gliosarcoma according to the most current WHO criteria. Extensive review of clinical, surgical, and pathology notes was performed to gather clinical and pathological data on these cases.

Results

Thirty consecutive patients in whom SGS had been diagnosed between 1996 and 2008 were included in the analysis. All patients had previously received a diagnosis of malignant glioma. For the initial malignant glioma, all patients underwent resection, and 25 patients received both external-beam radiation and chemotherapy. Three patients received radiotherapy alone, 1 patient was treated with chemotherapy alone, and 1 patient's tumor rapidly recurred as gliosarcoma, requiring surgical intervention prior to initiation of adjuvant therapy. The median time from diagnosis of the initial tumor to diagnosis of gliosarcoma was 8.5 months (range 0.5–25 months). All but 1 patient (who only had a biopsy) underwent a second operation for gliosarcoma; 8 patients went on to receive radiotherapy (4 had brachytherapy, 3 had external-beam radiation, and 1 had Gamma Knife surgery); and 14 patients received additional chemotherapy. The median length of survival from the time of gliosarcoma diagnosis was 4.4 months (range 0.7–46 months). The median survival from the time of the original GBM diagnosis was 12.6 months (range 5.7–47.4 months). Patients who had received concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide for GBM had worse outcomes than those who had not (4.3 and 10.5 months, respectively; p = 0.045). There was no difference in time to diagnosis of gliosarcoma in these 2 groups (8 and 8.5 months; p = 0.387). Two patients who had not received radiation therapy for GBM had an anecdotally very prolonged survival (20.9 and 46.4 months).

Conclusions

The data underscore the difficulty associated with management of this disease. The strikingly poor survival of patients with SGS who had previously received combined radiation and temozolomide chemotherapy for GBM may reflect a unique molecular profile of GBM that eventually recurs as SGS. Further work will be required, controlling for multiple prognostic factors with larger numbers of patients.

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Hideyuki Kano, Jason Sheehan, Penny K. Sneed, Heyoung L. McBride, Byron Young, Christopher Duma, David Mathieu, Zachary Seymour, Michael W. McDermott, Douglas Kondziolka, Aditya Iyer, and L. Dade Lunsford

OBJECT

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a potentially important option for patients with skull base chondrosarcomas. The object of this study was to analyze the outcomes of SRS for chondrosarcoma patients who underwent this treatment as a part of multimodality management.

METHODS

Seven participating centers of the North American Gamma Knife Consortium (NAGKC) identified 46 patients who underwent SRS for skull base chondrosarcomas. Thirty-six patients had previously undergone tumor resections and 5 had been treated with fractionated radiation therapy (RT). The median tumor volume was 8.0 cm3 (range 0.9–28.2 cm3), and the median margin dose was 15 Gy (range 10.5–20 Gy). Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate progression-free and overall survival rates.

RESULTS

At a median follow-up of 75 months after SRS, 8 patients were dead. The actuarial overall survival after SRS was 89% at 3 years, 86% at 5 years, and 76% at 10 years. Local tumor progression occurred in 10 patients. The rate of progression-free survival (PFS) after SRS was 88% at 3 years, 85% at 5 years, and 70% at 10 years. Prior RT was significantly associated with shorter PFS. Eight patients required salvage resection, and 3 patients (7%) developed adverse radiation effects. Cranial nerve deficits improved in 22 (56%) of the 39 patients who deficits before SRS. Clinical improvement after SRS was noted in patients with abducens nerve paralysis (61%), oculomotor nerve paralysis (50%), lower cranial nerve dysfunction (50%), optic neuropathy (43%), facial neuropathy (38%), trochlear nerve paralysis (33%), trigeminal neuropathy (12%), and hearing loss (10%).

CONCLUSIONS

Stereotactic radiosurgery for skull base chondrosarcomas is an important adjuvant option for the treatment of these rare tumors, as part of a team approach that includes initial surgical removal of symptomatic larger tumors.

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Cecilia L. Dalle Ore, Stephen T. Magill, Roberto Rodriguez Rubio, Maryam N. Shahin, Manish K. Aghi, Philip V. Theodosopoulos, Javier E. Villanueva-Meyer, Robert C. Kersten, Oluwatobi O. Idowu, M. Reza Vagefi, and Michael W. McDermott

OBJECTIVE

Hyperostosing sphenoid wing meningiomas cause bony hyperostosis that may extend into the orbit, resulting in proptosis, restriction of extraocular movements, and/or compressive optic neuropathy. The extent of bony removal necessary and the optimal reconstruction strategy to prevent enophthalmos is debated. Herein, the authors present their surgical outcomes and reconstruction results.

METHODS

This is a retrospective review of 54 consecutive patients undergoing resection of sphenoid wing meningiomas associated with bony hyperostosis. The majority of cases were operated on by the senior author. Extent of tumor resection, volumetric bone resection, radiographic exophthalmos index, complications, and recurrence were analyzed.

RESULTS

The median age of the cohort was 52.1 years, with women comprising 83% of patients. Proptosis was a presenting symptom in 74%, and 52% had decreased visual acuity. The WHO grade was I (85%) or II (15%). The median follow-up was 2.6 years. On volumetric analysis, a median 86% of hyperostotic bone was resected. Gross-total resection of the intracranial tumor was achieved in 43% and the orbital tumor in 27%, and of all intracranial and orbital components in 20%. Orbital reconstruction was performed in 96% of patients. Postoperative vision was stable or improved in 98% of patients and diplopia improved in 89%. Postoperative complications occurred in 44% of patients, and 26% of patients underwent additional surgery for complication management. The most frequent complications were medical complications and extraocular movement deficits. The median preoperative exophthalmos index was 1.26, which improved to 1.12 immediately postoperatively and to 1.09 at the 6-month follow-up (p < 0.001). Postoperatively, 18 patients (33%) underwent adjuvant radiotherapy after subtotal resection. Tumors recurred/progressed in 12 patients (22%).

CONCLUSIONS

Resection of hyperostosing sphenoid wing meningiomas, particularly achieving gross-total resection of hyperostotic bone with a good aesthetic result, is challenging and associated with notable medical and ocular morbidity. Recurrence rates in this series are higher than previously reported. Nevertheless, the authors were able to attain improvement in proptosis and visual symptoms in the majority of patients by using a multidisciplinary approach.

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David R. Raleigh, Zachary A. Seymour, Bryan Tomlin, Philip V. Theodosopoulos, Mitchel S. Berger, Manish K. Aghi, Sarah E. Geneser, Devan Krishnamurthy, Shannon E. Fogh, Penny K. Sneed, and Michael W. McDermott

OBJECTIVE

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with or without whole-brain radiotherapy can be used to achieve local control (> 90%) for small brain metastases after resection. However, many brain metastases are unsuitable for SRS because of their size or previous treatment, and whole-brain radiotherapy is associated with significant neurocognitive morbidity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy and toxicity of surgery and iodine-125 (125I) brachytherapy for brain metastases.

METHODS

A total of 95 consecutive patients treated for 105 brain metastases at a single institution between September 1997 and July 2013 were identified for this analysis retrospectively. Each patient underwent MRI followed by craniotomy with resection of metastasis and placement of 125I sources as permanent implants. The patients were followed with serial surveillance MRIs. The relationships among local control, overall survival, and necrosis were estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with results of log-rank tests and multivariate regression models.

RESULTS

The median age at surgery was 59 years (range 29.9–81.6 years), 53% of the lesions had been treated previously, and the median preoperative metastasis volume was 13.5 cm3 (range 0.21–76.2 cm3). Gross-total resection was achieved in 81% of the cases. The median number of 125I sources implanted per cavity was 28 (range 4–93), and the median activity was 0.73 mCi (range 0.34–1.3 mCi) per source. A total of 476 brain MRIs were analyzed (median MRIs per patient 3; range 0–22). Metastasis size was the strongest predictor of cavity volume and shrinkage (p < 0.0001). Multivariable regression modeling failed to predict the likelihood of local progression or necrosis according to metastasis volume, cavity volume, or the rate of cavity remodeling regardless of source activity or previous SRS. The median clinical follow-up time in living patients was 14.4 months (range 0.02–13.6 years), and crude local control was 90%. Median overall survival extended from 2.1 months in the shortest quartile to 62.3 months in the longest quartile (p < 0.0001). The overall risk of necrosis was 15% and increased significantly for lesions with a history of previous SRS (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Therapeutic options for patients with large or recurrent brain metastases are limited. Data from this study suggest that resection with permanent 125I brachytherapy is an effective strategy for achieving local control of brain metastasis. Although metastasis volume significantly influences resection cavity size and remodeling, volumetric parameters do not seem to influence local control or necrosis. With careful patient selection, this treatment regimen is associated with minimal toxicity and can result in long-term survival for some patients.

▪ CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE Type of question: therapeutic; study design: retrospective case series; evidence: Class IV.

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Edward F. Chang, Aaron Clark, Justin S. Smith, Mei-Yin Polley, Susan M. Chang, Nicholas M. Barbaro, Andrew T. Parsa, Michael W. McDermott, and Mitchel S. Berger

Object

Low-grade gliomas (LGGs) frequently infiltrate highly functional or “eloquent” brain areas. Given the lack of long-term survival data, the prognostic significance of eloquent brain tumor location and the role of functional mapping during resective surgery in presumed eloquent brain regions are unknown.

Methods

We performed a retrospective analysis of 281 cases involving adults who underwent resection of a supratentorial LGG at a brain tumor referral center. Preoperative MR images were evaluated blindly for involvement of eloquent brain areas, including the sensorimotor and language cortices, and specific subcortical structures. For high-risk tumors located in presumed eloquent brain areas, long-term survival estimates were evaluated for patients who underwent intraoperative functional mapping with electrocortical stimulation and for those who did not.

Results

One hundred and seventy-four patients (62%) had high-risk LGGs that were located in presumed eloquent areas. Adjusting for other known prognostic factors, patients with tumors in areas presumed to be eloquent had worse overall and progression-free survival (OS, hazard ratio [HR] 6.1, 95% CI 2.6–14.1; PFS, HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2–2.9; Cox proportional hazards). Confirmation of tumor overlapping functional areas during intraoperative mapping was strongly associated with shorter survival (OS, HR 9.6, 95% CI 3.6–25.9). In contrast, when mapping revealed that tumor spared true eloquent areas, patients had significantly longer survival, nearly comparable to patients with tumors that clearly involved only noneloquent areas, as demonstrated by preoperative imaging (OS, HR 2.9, 95% CI 1.0–8.5).

Conclusions

Presumed eloquent location of LGGs is an important but modifiable risk factor predicting disease progression and death. Delineation of true functional and nonfunctional areas by intraoperative mapping in high-risk patients to maximize tumor resection can dramatically improve long-term survival.