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In vivo visualization of GL261-luc2 mouse glioma cells by use of Alexa Fluor–labeled TRP-2 antibodies

Kathryn E. Fenton, Nikolay L. Martirosyan, Mohammed G. Abdelwahab, Stephen W. Coons, Mark C. Preul, and Adrienne C. Scheck

Object

For patients with glioblastoma multiforme, median survival time is approximately 14 months. Longer progression-free and overall survival times correlate with gross-total resection of tumor. The ability to identify tumor cells intraoperatively could result in an increased percentage of tumor resected and thus increased patient survival times. Available labeling methods rely on metabolic activity of tumor cells; thus, they are more robust in high-grade tumors, and their utility in low-grade tumors and metastatic tumors is not clear. The authors demonstrate intraoperative identification of tumor cells by using labeled tumor-specific antibodies.

Methods

GL261 mouse glioma cells exhibit high expression of a membrane-bound protein called second tyrosinase-related protein (TRP-2). The authors used these cells to establish an intracranial, immunocompetent model of malignant glioma. Antibodies to TRP-2 were labeled by using Alexa Fluor 488 fluorescent dye and injected into the tail vein of albino C57BL/6 mice. After 24 hours, a craniotomy was performed and the tissue was examined in vivo by using an Optiscan 5.1 handheld portable confocal fiber-optic microscope. Tissue was examined ex vivo by using a Pascal 5 scanning confocal microscope.

Results

Labeled tumor cells were visible in vivo and ex vivo under the respective microscopes.

Conclusions

Fluorescently labeled tumor-specific antibodies are capable of binding and identifying tumor cells in vivo, accurately and specifically. The development of labeled markers for the identification of brain tumors will facilitate the use of intraoperative fluorescence microscopy as a tool for increasing the extent of resection of a broad variety of intracranial tumors.

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Anatomy, technology, art, and culture: toward a realistic perspective of the brain

Daniel D. Cavalcanti, William Feindel, James T. Goodrich, T. Forcht Dagi, Charles J. Prestigiacomo, and Mark C. Preul

In the 15th century, brain illustration began to change from a schematic system that involved scant objective rendering of the brain, to accurate depictions based on anatomical dissections that demanded significant artistic talent. Notable examples of this innovation are the drawings of Leonardo da Vinci (1498–1504), Andreas Vesalius' association with the bottega of Titian to produce the drawings of Vesalius' De humani corporis fabrica (1543), and Christopher Wren's illustrations for Thomas Willis' Cerebri Anatome (1664). These works appeared during the Renaissance and Age of Enlightenment, when advances in brain imaging, or really brain rendering, reflected not only the abilities and dedications of the artists, but also the influences of important cultural and scientific factors. Anatomy and human dissection became popular social phenomena as well as scholarly pursuits, linked with the world of the fine arts. The working philosophy of these artists involved active participation in both anatomical study and illustration, and the belief that their discoveries of the natural world could best be communicated by rendering them in objective form (that is, with realistic perspective). From their studies emerged the beginning of contemporary brain imaging. In this article, the authors examine how the brain began to be imaged in realism within a cultural and scientific milieu that witnessed the emergence of anatomical dissection, the geometry of linear perspective, and the closer confluence of art and science.

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Hyaluronic acid scaffold has a neuroprotective effect in hemisection spinal cord injury

Sergiy V. Kushchayev, Morgan B. Giers, Doris Hom Eng, Nikolay L. Martirosyan, Jennifer M. Eschbacher, Martin M. Mortazavi, Nicholas Theodore, Alyssa Panitch, and Mark C. Preul

OBJECTIVE

Spinal cord injury occurs in 2 phases. The initial trauma is followed by inflammation that leads to fibrous scar tissue, glial scarring, and cavity formation. Scarring causes further axon death around and above the injury. A reduction in secondary injury could lead to functional improvement. In this study, hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels were implanted into the gap formed in the hemisected spinal cord of Sprague-Dawley rats in an attempt to attenuate damage and regenerate tissue.

METHODS

A T-10 hemisection spinal cord injury was created in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats; the rats were assigned to a sham, control (phosphate-buffered saline), or HA hydrogel–treated group. One cohort of 23 animals was followed for 12 weeks and underwent weekly behavioral assessments. At 12 weeks, retrograde tracing was performed by injecting Fluoro-Gold in the left L-2 gray matter. At 14 weeks, the animals were killed. The volume of the lesion and the number of cells labeled from retrograde tracing were calculated. Animals in a separate cohort were killed at 8 or 16 weeks and perfused for immunohistochemical analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Samples were stained using H & E, neurofilament stain (neurons and axons), silver stain (disrupted axons), glial fibrillary acidic protein stain (astrocytes), and Iba1 stain (mononuclear cells).

RESULTS

The lesions were significantly smaller in size and there were more retrograde-labeled cells in the red nuclei of the HA hydrogel–treated rats than in those of the controls; however, the behavioral assessments revealed no differences between the groups. The immunohistochemical analyses revealed decreased fibrous scarring and increased retention of organized intact axonal tissue in the HA hydrogel–treated group. There was a decreased presence of inflammatory cells in the HA hydrogel–treated group. No axonal or neuronal regeneration was observed.

CONCLUSIONS

The results of these experiments show that HA hydrogel had a neuroprotective effect on the spinal cord by decreasing the magnitude of secondary injury after a lacerating spinal cord injury. Although regeneration and behavioral improvement were not observed, the reduction in disorganized scar tissue and the retention of neurons near and above the lesion are important for future regenerative efforts. In addition, this gel would be useful as the base substrate in the development of a more complex scaffold.

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Craniovertebral junction fixation with transarticular screws: biomechanical analysis of a novel technique

L. Fernando Gonzalez, Neil R. Crawford, Robert H. Chamberlain, Luis E. Perez Garza, Mark C. Preul, Volker K. H. Sonntag, and Curtis A. Dickman

Object. The authors compared the biomechanical stability resulting from the use of a new technique for occipitoatlantal motion segment fixation with an established method and assessed the additional stability provided by combining the two techniques.

Methods. Specimens were loaded using nonconstraining pure moments while recording the three-dimensional angular movement at occiput (Oc)—C1 and C1–2. Specimens were tested intact and after destabilization and fixation as follows: 1) Oc—C1 transarticular screws plus C1–2 transarticular screws; 2) occipitocervical transarticular (OCTA) plate in which C1–2 transarticular screws attach to a loop from Oc to C-2; and (3) OCTA plate plus Oc—C1 transarticular screws.

Occipitoatlantal transarticular screws reduced motion to well within the normal range. The OCTA loop and transarticular screws allowed a very small neutral zone, elastic zone, and range of motion during lateral bending and axial rotation. The transarticular screws, however, were less effective than the OCTA loop in resisting flexion and extension.

Conclusions. Biomechanically, Oc—C1 transarticular screws performed well enough to be considered as an alternative for Oc—C1 fixation, especially when instability at C1–2 is minimal. Techniques for augmenting these screws posteriorly by using a wired bone graft buttress, as is currently undertaken with C1–2 transarticular screws, may be needed for optimal performance.

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From the notch to a glioma grading system: the neurological contributions of James Watson Kernohan

Sam Safavi-Abbasi, Adrian J. Maurer, Jacob B. Archer, Ricardo A. Hanel, Michael E. Sughrue, Nicholas Theodore, and Mark C. Preul

During his lifetime and a career spanning 42 years, James Watson Kernohan made numerous contributions to neuropathology, neurology, and neurosurgery. One of these, the phenomenon of ipsilateral, false localizing signs caused by compression of the contralateral cerebral peduncle against the tentorial edge, has widely become known as “Kernohan's notch” and continues to bear his name. The other is a grading system for gliomas from a neurosurgical viewpoint that continues to be relevant for grading of glial tumors 60 years after its introduction. In this paper, the authors analyze these two major contributions in detail within the context of Kernohan's career and explore how they contributed to the development of neurosurgical procedures.

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The effects of intrathecal hypotension on tissue perfusion and pathophysiological outcome after acute spinal cord injury

Laboratory investigation

Eric M. Horn, Nicholas Theodore, Rachid Assina, Robert F. Spetzler, Volker K. H. Sonntag, and Mark C. Preul

Object

Venous stasis and intrathecal hypertension are believed to play a significant role in the hypoperfusion present in the spinal cord following injury. Lowering the intrathecal pressure via cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage has been effective in treating spinal cord ischemia during aorta surgery. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether CSF drainage increases spinal cord perfusion and improves outcome after spinal injury in an animal model.

Methods

Anesthetized adult rabbits were subjected to a severe contusion spinal cord injury (SCI). Cerebrospinal fluid was then drained via a catheter to lower the intrathecal pressure by 10 mm Hg. Tissue perfusion was assessed at the site of injury, and values obtained before and after CSF drainage were compared. Two other cohorts of animals were subjected to SCI: 1 group subsequently underwent CSF drainage and the other did not. Results of histological analysis, motor evoked potential and motor function testing were compared between the 2 cohorts at 4 weeks postinjury.

Results

Cerebrospinal fluid drainage led to no significant improvement in spinal cord tissue perfusion. Four weeks after injury, the animals that underwent CSF drainage demonstrated significantly smaller areas of tissue damage at the injury site. There were no differences in motor evoked potentials or motor score outcomes at 4 weeks postinjury.

Conclusions

Cerebrospinal fluid drainage effectively lowers intrathecal pressure and decreases the amount of tissue damage in an animal model of spinal cord injury. Further studies are needed to determine whether different draining regimens can improve motor or electrophysiological outcomes.

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Prospective evaluation of the utility of intraoperative confocal laser endomicroscopy in patients with brain neoplasms using fluorescein sodium: experience with 74 cases

Nikolay L. Martirosyan, Jennifer M. Eschbacher, M. Yashar S. Kalani, Jay D. Turner, Evgenii Belykh, Robert F. Spetzler, Peter Nakaji, and Mark C. Preul

OBJECTIVE

This study evaluated the utility, specificity, and sensitivity of intraoperative confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) to provide diagnostic information during resection of human brain tumors.

METHODS

CLE imaging was used in the resection of intracranial neoplasms in 74 consecutive patients (31 male; mean age 47.5 years; sequential 10-month study period). Intraoperative in vivo and ex vivo CLE was performed after intravenous injection of fluorescein sodium (FNa). Tissue samples from CLE imaging–matched areas were acquired for comparison with routine histological analysis (frozen and permanent sections). CLE images were classified as diagnostic or nondiagnostic. The specificities and sensitivities of CLE and frozen sections for gliomas and meningiomas were calculated using permanent histological sections as the standard.

RESULTS

CLE images were obtained for each patient. The mean duration of intraoperative CLE system use was 15.7 minutes (range 3–73 minutes). A total of 20,734 CLE images were correlated with 267 biopsy specimens (mean number of images/biopsy location, in vivo 84, ex vivo 70). CLE images were diagnostic for 45.98% in vivo and 52.97% ex vivo specimens. After initiation of CLE, an average of 14 in vivo images and 7 ex vivo images were acquired before identification of a first diagnostic image. CLE specificity and sensitivity were, respectively, 94% and 91% for gliomas and 93% and 97% for meningiomas.

CONCLUSIONS

CLE with FNa provided intraoperative histological information during brain tumor removal. Specificities and sensitivities of CLE for gliomas and meningiomas were comparable to those for frozen sections. These data suggest that CLE could allow the interactive identification of tumor areas, substantially improving intraoperative decisions during the resection of brain tumors.

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Monsters and the case of L. Joseph: André Feil's thesis on the origin of the Klippel-Feil syndrome and a social transformation of medicine

Evgenii Belykh, Kashif Malik, Isabelle Simoneau, Kaan Yagmurlu, Ting Lei, Daniel D. Cavalcanti, Vadim A. Byvaltsev, Nicholas Theodore, and Mark C. Preul

André Feil (1884–1955) was a French physician best recognized for his description, coauthored with Maurice Klippel, of patients with congenital fusion of cervical vertebrae, a condition currently known as Klippel-Feil syndrome. However, little is known about his background aside from the fact that he was a student of Klippel and a physician who took a keen interest in describing congenital anomalies. Despite the relative lack of information on Feil, his contributions to the fields of spinal disease and teratology extended far beyond science to play an integral role in changing the misguided perception shrouding patients with disfigurements, defects, deformities, and so-called monstrous births. In particular, Feil's 1919 medical school thesis on cervical abnormalities was a critical publication in defying long-held theory and opinion that human “monstrosities,” anomalies, developmental abnormalities, and altered congenital physicality were a consequence of sinful behavior or a reversion to a primitive state. Indeed, his thesis on a spinal deformity centering on his patient, L. Joseph, was at the vanguard for a new view of a patient as nothing less than fully human, no matter his or her physicality or appearance.

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Quantification of motion during microvascular anastomosis simulation using machine learning hand detection

Nicolas I. Gonzalez-Romo, Sahin Hanalioglu, Giancarlo Mignucci-Jiménez, Grant Koskay, Irakliy Abramov, Yuan Xu, Wonhyoung Park, Michael T. Lawton, and Mark C. Preul

OBJECTIVE

Microanastomosis is one of the most technically demanding and important microsurgical skills for a neurosurgeon. A hand motion detector based on machine learning tracking technology was developed and implemented for performance assessment during microvascular anastomosis simulation.

METHODS

A microanastomosis motion detector was developed using a machine learning model capable of tracking 21 hand landmarks without physical sensors attached to a surgeon’s hands. Anastomosis procedures were simulated using synthetic vessels, and hand motion was recorded with a microscope and external camera. Time series analysis was performed to quantify the economy, amplitude, and flow of motion using data science algorithms. Six operators with various levels of technical expertise (2 experts, 2 intermediates, and 2 novices) were compared.

RESULTS

The detector recorded a mean (SD) of 27.6 (1.8) measurements per landmark per second with a 10% mean loss of tracking for both hands. During 600 seconds of simulation, the 4 nonexperts performed 26 bites in total, with a combined excess of motion of 14.3 (15.5) seconds per bite, whereas the 2 experts performed 33 bites (18 and 15 bites) with a mean (SD) combined excess of motion of 2.8 (2.3) seconds per bite for the dominant hand. In 180 seconds, the experts performed 13 bites, with mean (SD) latencies of 22.2 (4.4) and 23.4 (10.1) seconds, whereas the 2 intermediate operators performed a total of 9 bites with mean (SD) latencies of 31.5 (7.1) and 34.4 (22.1) seconds per bite.

CONCLUSIONS

A hand motion detector based on machine learning technology allows the identification of gross and fine movements performed during microanastomosis. Economy, amplitude, and flow of motion were measured using time series data analysis. Technical expertise could be inferred from such quantitative performance analysis.

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Letter to the Editor: Joining the masters: the Dolenc-Kawase approach

Eberval Gadelha Figueiredo, Manoel J. Teixeira, Robert F. Spetzler, and Mark C. Preul