Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 31 items for

  • Author or Editor: Veit Rohde x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Robotic versus fluoroscopy-guided pedicle screw insertion for metastatic spinal disease: a matched-cohort comparison

Volodymyr Solomiichuk, Julius Fleischhammer, Granit Molliqaj, Jwad Warda, Awad Alaid, Kajetan von Eckardstein, Karl Schaller, Enrico Tessitore, Veit Rohde, and Bawarjan Schatlo

OBJECTIVE

Robot-guided pedicle screw placement is an established technique for the placement of pedicle screws. However, most studies have focused on degenerative disease. In this paper, the authors focus on metastatic spinal disease, which is associated with osteolysis. The associated lack of dense bone may potentially affect the automatic recognition accuracy of radiography-based surgical assistance systems. The aim of the present study is to compare the accuracy of the SpineAssist robot system with conventional fluoroscopy-guided pedicle screw placement for thoracolumbar metastatic spinal disease.

METHODS

Seventy patients with metastatic spinal disease who required instrumentation were included in this retrospective matched-cohort study. All 70 patients underwent surgery performed by the same team of experienced surgeons. The decision to use robot-assisted or fluoroscopy-guided pedicle screw placement was based the availability of the robot system. In patients who underwent surgery with robot guidance, pedicle screws were inserted after preoperative planning and intraoperative fluoroscopic matching. In the “conventional” group, anatomical landmarks and anteroposterior and lateral fluoroscopy guided placement of the pedicle screws. The primary outcome measure was the accuracy of screw placement on the Gertzbein-Robbins scale. Grades A and B (< 2-mm pedicle breach) were considered clinically acceptable, and all other grades indicated misplacement. Secondary outcome measures included an intergroup comparison of direction of screw misplacement, surgical site infection, and radiation exposure.

RESULTS

A total of 406 screws were placed at 206 levels. Sixty-one (29.6%) surgically treated levels were in the upper thoracic spine (T1–6), 74 (35.9%) were in the lower thoracic spine, and the remaining 71 (34.4%) were in the lumbosacral region. In the robot-assisted group (Group I; n = 35, 192 screws), trajectories were Grade A or B in 162 (84.4%) of screws. The misplacement rate was 15.6% (30 of 192 screws). In the conventional group (Group II; n = 35, 214 screws), 83.6% (179 of 214) of screw trajectories were acceptable, with a misplacement rate of 16.4% (35 of 214). There was no difference in screw accuracy between the groups (chi-square, 2-tailed Fisher’s exact, p = 0.89). One screw misplacement in the fluoroscopy group required a second surgery (0.5%), but no revisions were required in the robot group. There was no difference in surgical site infections between the 2 groups (Group I, 5 patients [14.3%]; Group II, 8 patients [22.9%]) or in the duration of surgery between the 2 groups (Group I, 226.1 ± 78.8 minutes; Group II, 264.1 ± 124.3 minutes; p = 0.13). There was also no difference in radiation time between the groups (Group I, 138.2 ± 73.0 seconds; Group II, 126.5 ± 95.6 seconds; p = 0.61), but the radiation intensity was higher in the robot group (Group I, 2.8 ± 0.2 mAs; Group II, 2.0 ± 0.6 mAs; p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Pedicle screw placement for metastatic disease in the thoracolumbar spine can be performed effectively and safely using robot-guided assistance. Based on this retrospective analysis, accuracy, radiation time, and postoperative infection rates are comparable to those of the conventional technique.

Restricted access

Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula associated with a spinal perimedullary fistula

Case report

Timo Krings, Volker A. Coenen, Martin Weinzierl, Marcus H. T. Reinges, Michael Mull, Armin Thron, and Veit Rohde

✓ Among spinal cord vascular malformations, dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) must be distinguished from intradural malformations. The concurrence of both is extremely rare. The authors report the case of a 35-year-old man who suffered from progressive myelopathy and who harbored both a DAVF and an intradural perimedullary fistula. During surgery, both fistulas were identified, confirmed, and subsequently obliterated. The fistulas were located at two levels directly adjacent to each other. Although the incidence of concurrent spinal DAVFs is presumed to be approximately 2%, the combination of a dural and an intradural fistula is exceedingly rare; only two other cases have been reported in the literature. One can speculate whether the alteration in venous drainage caused by the (presumably congenital) perimedullary fistula could possibly promote the production of a second dural fistula due to elevated pressure with concomitant venous stagnation and subsequent thrombosis. The authors conclude that despite the rarity of dual pathological entities, the clinician should be aware of the possibility of the concurrence of more than one spinal fistula in the same patient.

Full access

A critical comparison between the semisitting and the supine positioning in vestibular schwannoma surgery: subgroup analysis of a randomized, multicenter trial

Christian Scheller, Stefan Rampp, Marcos Tatagiba, Alireza Gharabaghi, Kristofer F. Ramina, Oliver Ganslandt, Barbara Bischoff, Cordula Matthies, Thomas Westermaier, Maria Teresa Pedro, Veit Rohde, Kajetan von Eckardstein, and Christian Strauss

OBJECTIVE

Patient positioning in vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery is a matter of ongoing discussion. Factors to consider include preservation of cranial nerve functions, extent of tumor resection, and complications. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal patient positioning in VS surgery.

METHODS

A subgroup analysis of a randomized, multicenter trial that investigated the efficacy of prophylactic nimodipine in VS surgery was performed to investigate the impact of positioning (semisitting or supine) on extent of resection, functional outcomes, and complications. The data of 97 patients were collected prospectively. All procedures were performed via a retrosigmoid approach. The semisitting position was chosen in 56 patients, whereas 41 patients were treated while supine.

RESULTS

Complete resection was obtained at a higher percentage in the semisitting as compared to the supine position (93% vs 73%, p = 0.002). Logistic regression analysis revealed significantly better facial nerve function in the early postoperative course in the semisitting group (p = 0.004), particularly concerning severe facial nerve paresis (House-Brackmann grade IV or worse; p = 0.002). One year after surgery, facial nerve function recovered. However, there was still a tendency for better facial nerve function in the semisitting group (p = 0.091). There were no significant differences between groups regarding hearing preservation rates. Venous air embolism with the necessity to terminate surgery occurred in 2 patients in the semisitting position (3.6%). Supplementary analysis with a 2-tailed permutation randomization with 10,000 permutations of treatment choice and a propensity score matching showed either a tendency or significant results for better facial nerve outcomes in the early postoperative course and extent of resection in the semisitting group.

CONCLUSIONS

Although the results of the various statistical analyses are not uniform, the data indicate better results concerning both a higher rate of complete removal (according to the intraoperative impression of the surgeon) and facial nerve function after a semisitting as compared to the supine position. These advantages may justify the potential higher risk for severe complications of the semisitting position in VS surgery. The choice of positioning has to consider all individual patient parameters and risks carefully.

Free access

Surgical management of spinal metastases involving the cervicothoracic junction: results of a multicenter, European observational study

Vanessa Hubertus, Jens Gempt, Michelle Mariño, Björn Sommer, Sven O. Eicker, Martin Stangenberg, Marc Dreimann, Insa Janssen, Christoph Wipplinger, Arthur Wagner, Nicole Lange, Ann-Kathrin Jörger, Marcus Czabanka, Veit Rohde, Karl Schaller, Claudius Thomé, Peter Vajkoczy, Julia S. Onken, and Bernhard Meyer

OBJECTIVE

Surgical management of spinal metastases at the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) is highly complex and relies on case-based decision-making. The aim of this multicentric study was to describe surgical procedures for metastases at the CTJ and provide guidance for clinical and surgical management.

METHODS

Patients eligible for this study were those with metastases at the CTJ (C7–T2) who had been consecutively treated in 2005–2019 at 7 academic institutions across Europe. The Spine Instability Neoplastic Score, neurological function, clinical status, medical history, and surgical data for each patient were retrospectively assessed. Patients were divided into four surgical groups: 1) posterior decompression only, 2) posterior decompression and fusion, 3) anterior corpectomy and fusion, and 4) anterior corpectomy and 360° fusion. Endpoints were complications, surgical revision rate, and survival.

RESULTS

Among the 238 patients eligible for inclusion this study, 37 were included in group 1 (15%), 127 in group 2 (53%), 18 in group 3 (8%), and 56 in group 4 (24%). Mechanical pain was the predominant symptom (79%, 189 patients). Surgical complications occurred in 16% (group 1), 20% (group 2), 11% (group 3), and 18% (group 4). Of these, hardware failure (HwF) occurred in 18% and led to surgical revision in 7 of 8 cases. The overall complication rate was 34%. In-hospital mortality was 5%.

CONCLUSIONS

Posterior fusion and decompression was the most frequently used technique. Care should be taken to choose instrumentation techniques that offer the highest possible biomechanical load-bearing capacity to avoid HwF. Since the overall complication rate is high, the prevention of in-hospital complications seems crucial to reduce in-hospital mortality.

Full access

Giant intracranial aneurysms: natural history and 1-year case fatality after endovascular or surgical treatment

Julius Dengler, Daniel Rüfenacht, Bernhard Meyer, Veit Rohde, Matthias Endres, Pavlina Lenga, Konstantin Uttinger, Viktoria Rücker, Maria Wostrack, Adisa Kursumovic, Bujung Hong, Dorothee Mielke, Nils Ole Schmidt, Jan-Karl Burkhardt, Philippe Bijlenga, Edoardo Boccardi, Christophe Cognard, Peter U. Heuschmann, Peter Vajkoczy, and On behalf of the Giant Intracranial Aneurysm Study Group

OBJECTIVE

Clinical evidence on giant intracranial aneurysms (GIAs), intracranial aneurysms with a diameter of at least 25 mm, is limited. The authors aimed to investigate the natural history, case fatality, and treatment outcomes of ruptured and unruptured GIAs.

METHODS

In this international observational registry study, patients with a ruptured or unruptured GIA received conservative management (CM), surgical management (SM), or endovascular management (EM). The authors investigated rupture rates and case fatality.

RESULTS

The retrospective cohort comprised 219 patients with GIAs (21.9% ruptured GIAs and 78.1% unruptured GIAs) whose index hospitalization occurred between January 2006 and November 2016. The index hospitalization in the prospective cohort (362 patients with GIAs [17.1% ruptured and 82.9% unruptured]) occurred between December 2008 and February 2017. In the retrospective cohort, the risk ratio for death at a mean follow-up of 4.8 years (SD 2.2 years) after CM, compared with EM and SM, was 1.63 (95% CI 1.23–2.16) in ruptured GIAs and 3.96 (95% CI 2.57–6.11) in unruptured GIAs. In the prospective cohort, the 1-year case fatality in ruptured GIAs/unruptured GIAs was 100%/22.0% during CM, 36.0%/3.0% after SM, and 39.0%/12.0% after EM. Corresponding 1-year rupture rates in unruptured GIAs were 25.0% during CM, 1.2% after SM, and 2.5% after EM. In unruptured GIAs, the HR for death within the 1st year in patients with posterior circulation GIAs was 6.7 (95% CI 1.5–30.4, p < 0.01), with patients with a GIA at the supraclinoid internal carotid artery as reference. Different sizes of unruptured GIAs were not associated with 1-year case fatality.

CONCLUSIONS

Rupture rates for unruptured GIAs were high, and the natural history and treatment outcomes for ruptured GIAs were poor. Patients undergoing SM or EM showed lower case fatality and rupture rates than those undergoing CM. This difference in outcome may in part be influenced by patients in the CM group having been found poor candidates for SM or EM.

Clinical trial registration no.: NCT02066493 (clinicaltrials.gov)

Restricted access

Prophylactic nimodipine treatment for cochlear and facial nerve preservation after vestibular schwannoma surgery: a randomized multicenter Phase III trial

Christian Scheller, Andreas Wienke, Marcos Tatagiba, Alireza Gharabaghi, Kristofer F. Ramina, Oliver Ganslandt, Barbara Bischoff, Johannes Zenk, Tobias Engelhorn, Cordula Matthies, Thomas Westermaier, Gregor Antoniadis, Maria Teresa Pedro, Veit Rohde, Kajetan von Eckardstein, Thomas Kretschmer, Malte Kornhuber, Jörg Steighardt, Michael Richter, Fred G. Barker II, and Christian Strauss

OBJECT

A pilot study of prophylactic nimodipine and hydroxyethyl starch treatment showed a beneficial effect on facial and cochlear nerve preservation following vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery. A prospective Phase III trial was undertaken to confirm these results.

METHODS

An open-label, 2-arm, randomized parallel group and multicenter Phase III trial with blinded expert review was performed and included 112 patients who underwent VS surgery between January 2010 and February 2013 at 7 departments of neurosurgery to investigate the efficacy and safety of the prophylaxis. The surgery was performed after the patients were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups using online randomization. The treatment group (n = 56) received parenteral nimodipine (1–2 mg/hr) and hydroxyethyl starch (hematocrit 30%–35%) from the day before surgery until the 7th postoperative day. The control group (n = 56) was not treated prophylactically.

RESULTS

Intent-to-treat analysis showed no statistically significant effects of the treatment on either preservation of facial nerve function (35 [67.3%] of 52 [treatment group] compared with 34 [72.3%] of 47 [control group]) (p = 0.745) or hearing preservation (11 [23.4%] of 47 [treatment group] compared with 15 [31.2%] of 48 [control group]) (p = 0.530) 12 months after surgery. Since tumor sizes were significantly larger in the treatment group than in the control group, logistic regression analysis was required. The risk for deterioration of facial nerve function was adjusted nearly the same in both groups (OR 1.07 [95% CI 0.34–3.43], p = 0.91). In contrast, the risk for postoperative hearing loss was adjusted 2 times lower in the treatment group compared with the control group (OR 0.49 [95% CI 0.18–1.30], p = 0.15). Apart from dose-dependent hypotension (p < 0.001), no clinically relevant adverse reactions were observed.

CONCLUSIONS

There were no statistically significant effects of the treatment. Despite the width of the confidence intervals, the odds ratios may suggest but do not prove a clinically relevant effect of the safe study medication on the preservation of cochlear nerve function after VS surgery. Further study is needed before prophylactic nimodipine can be recommended in VS surgery.

Restricted access

Stability of hearing preservation and regeneration capacity of the cochlear nerve following vestibular schwannoma surgery via a retrosigmoid approach

Christian Scheller, Andreas Wienke, Marcos Tatagiba, Alireza Gharabaghi, Kristofer F. Ramina, Oliver Ganslandt, Barbara Bischoff, Cordula Matthies, Thomas Westermaier, Gregor Antoniadis, Maria Teresa Pedro, Veit Rohde, Kajetan von Eckardstein, Thomas Kretschmer, Johannes Zenk, and Christian Strauss

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this research was to examine the stability of long-term hearing preservation and the regeneration capacity of the cochlear nerve following vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery in a prospective study.

METHODS

A total of 112 patients were recruited for a randomized multicenter trial between January 2010 and April 2012 to investigate the efficacy of prophylactic nimodipine treatment versus no prophylactic nimodipine treatment in VS surgery. For the present investigation, both groups were pooled to compare hearing abilities in the early postoperative course and 1 year after the surgery. Hearing was examined using pure-tone audiometry with speech discrimination, which was performed preoperatively, in the early postoperative course, and 12 months after surgery and was subsequently classified by an independent otorhinolaryngologist using the Gardner-Robertson classification system.

RESULTS

Hearing abilities at 2 time points were compared by evaluation in the early postoperative course and 1 year after surgery in 102 patients. The chi-square test showed a very strong association between the 2 measurements in all 102 patients (p < 0.001) and in the subgroup of 66 patients with a preserved cochlear nerve (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

There is no significant change in cochlear nerve function between the early postoperative course and 1 year after VS surgery. The result of hearing performance, as evaluated by early postoperative audiometry after VS surgery, seems to be a reliable prognosticator for future hearing ability.

Clinical trial registration nos.: 2009-012088-32 (clinicaltrialsregister.eu) and DRKS 00000328 (“AkNiPro,” drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/drks_web/)

Restricted access

Prophylactic nimodipine treatment and improvement in hearing outcome after vestibular schwannoma surgery: a combined analysis of a randomized, multicenter, Phase III trial and its pilot study

Christian Scheller, Andreas Wienke, Marcos Tatagiba, Alireza Gharabaghi, Kristofer F. Ramina, Oliver Ganslandt, Barbara Bischoff, Johannes Zenk, Tobias Engelhorn, Cordula Matthies, Thomas Westermaier, Gregor Antoniadis, Maria Teresa Pedro, Veit Rohde, Kajetan von Eckardstein, Thomas Kretschmer, Malte Kornhuber, Jörg Steighardt, Michael Richter, Fred G. Barker II, and Christian Strauss

OBJECTIVE

In clinical routines, neuroprotective strategies in neurosurgical interventions are still missing. A pilot study (n = 30) and an analogously performed Phase III trial (n = 112) pointed to a beneficial effect of prophylactic nimodipine and hydroxyethyl starch (HES) in vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery. Considering the small sample size, the data from both studies were pooled.

METHODS

The patients in both investigator-initiated studies were assigned to 2 groups. The treatment group (n = 70) received parenteral nimodipine (1–2 mg/hour) and HES (hematocrit 30%–35%) from the day before surgery until the 7th postoperative day. The control group (n = 72) was not treated prophylactically. Facial and cochlear nerve functions were documented preoperatively, during the inpatient care, and 1 year after surgery.

RESULTS

Pooled raw data were analyzed retrospectively. Intent-to-treat analysis revealed a significantly lower risk for hearing loss (Class D) 12 months after surgery in the treatment group compared with the control group (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.22–0.97; p = 0.04). After exclusion of patients with preoperative Class D hearing, this effect was more pronounced (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.17–0.83; p = 0.016). Logistic regression analysis adjusted for tumor size showed a 4 times lower risk for hearing loss in the treatment group compared with the control group (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.09–0.63; p = 0.003). Facial nerve function was not significantly improved with treatment. Apart from dose-dependent hypotension (p < 0.001), the study medication was well tolerated.

CONCLUSIONS

Prophylactic nimodipine is safe and may be recommended in VS surgery to preserve hearing. Prophylactic neuroprotective treatment in surgeries in which nerves are at risk seems to be a novel and promising concept.

Clinical trial registration no.: DRKS 00000328 (https://drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/drks_web/)

Restricted access

Experiences with a gravity-assisted valve in hydrocephalic children

Clinical article

Ernst Johannes Haberl, Martina Messing-Juenger, Martin Schuhmann, Regina Eymann, Cornelia Cedzich, Michael J. Fritsch, Michael Kiefer, Eric Johannes Van Lindert, Christian Geyer, Markus Lehner, Veit Rohde, Andrea Stroux, and Petra von Berenberg

Object

Over the past decade, a gravity-assisted valve (GAV) has become a standard device in many European pediatric hydrocephalus centers. Because past comparative clinical outcome studies on valve design have not included any GAV, the authors in this trial evaluated the early results of GAV applications in a pediatric population.

Methods

For a minimum of 2 years the authors monitored 169 of 182 hydrocephalic children who received a pediatric GAV at their first CSF shunt insertion (61.5%) or as a substitute for any differential pressure valve (38.5%) at 1 of 7 European pediatric hydrocephalus centers. Outcomes were categorized as valve survival (primary outcome) or shunt survival (secondary outcome). The end point was defined as valve explantation.

Results

Within a follow-up period of 2 years, the valve remained functional in 130 (76.9%) of 169 patients. One hundred eight of these patients (63.9%) had an uncomplicated clinical course without any subsequent surgery, and 22 (13%) were submitted to a valve-preserving catheter revision without any further complications during the follow-up period. Thirty-nine patients (23.1%) reached an end point of valve explantation: 13 valve failures from infection (7.7%), 8 (4.7%) from overdrainage, and 18 (10.6%) from underdrainage.

Conclusions

Compared with nongravitational shunt designs, a GAV does not substantially affect the early complication rate. Valve-preserving shunt revisions do not increase the risk of subsequent valve failure and therefore should not be defined as an end point in studies on valve design. A significant impact of any well-established valve design on the early complication rate in shunt surgery is not supported by any current data; therefore, this correlation should be dismissed. As overdrainage-related complications have been shown to occur late, the presumed advantages of a pediatric GAV remain to be shown in a long-term study.

Open access

Lumbar dynamic pedicle-based stabilization versus fusion in degenerative disease: a multicenter, double-blind, prospective, randomized controlled trial

Bernhard Meyer, Claudius Thomé, Peter Vajkoczy, Victoria Kehl, Richard Dodel, Florian Ringel, and for the DYNORFUSE Study Group

OBJECTIVE

Fusion is the standard of treatment for degenerative lumbar symptomatic instabilities. Dynamic stabilization is a potential alternative, with the aim of reducing pathological motion. Potential advantages are a reduction of surgical complexity and morbidity. The aim of this study was to assess whether dynamic stabilization is associated with a higher degree of functional improvement while reducing surgical complexity and thereby surgical duration and perioperative complications in comparison with lumbar fusion.

METHODS

This was a multicenter, double-blind, prospective, randomized, 2-arm superiority trial. Patients with symptomatic mono- or bisegmental lumbar degenerative disease with or without stenosis and instability were randomized 1:1 to instrumented fusion or pedicle-based dynamic stabilization. Patients underwent either rigid internal fixation and interbody fusion or pedicle-based dynamic stabilization. The primary endpoint was the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score, and secondary endpoints were pain, health-related quality of life, and patient satisfaction at 24 months.

RESULTS

Of 293 patients randomized to fusion or dynamic stabilization, 269 were available for analysis. The duration of surgery was significantly shorter for dynamic stabilization versus fusion, and the blood loss was significantly less for dynamic stabilization (380 ml vs 506 ml). Assessment of primary and secondary outcome parameters revealed no significant differences between groups. There were no differences in the incidence of adverse events.

CONCLUSIONS

Dynamic pedicle-based stabilization can achieve similar clinical outcome as fusion in the treatment of lumbar degenerative instabilities. Secondary failures are not different between groups. However, dynamic stabilization is less complex than fusion and is a feasible alternative.