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Neuronal heterotopia with capillary penetration of neurons and cortical dysplasia in a patient with complex partial seizures

Case report

Venita Jay, Laurence E. Becker, Hiroshi Otsubo, Paul Hwang, Harold J. Hoffman, and Derek C. Armstrong

✓ Unusual pathological findings were encountered in a temporal lobectomy specimen from a 9-year-old boy with intractable complex partial seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enlarged left temporal lobe, with diffuse high signal intensity over the cortex and poor gray-white differentiation on T2-weighted imaging; single-photon emission computerized tomography showed decreased blood flow. Active epileptiform discharges were identified in the left temporal lobe with focal slow waves and generalized epileptiform paroxysms. Pathologically, the cortex revealed changes of focal cortical dysplasia with extensive disorganization of neuronal morphology, layering, and orientation as well as focal polymicrogyria. The cortical-white matter junction was indistinct with extensive neuronal heterotopias in the white matter. Large pale balloon cells akin to those seen in tuberous sclerosis were found scattered within the cortex and white matter. The most striking finding was that of a heterotopic nodule in the white matter, which revealed abnormal neurons with penetration of cell bodies by capillaries. Ultrastructurally, there were no degenerative changes in these neurons, and this unusual phenomenon is attributed to a developmental disturbance affecting neuronal, glial, and vascular elements.

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Detection of epileptogenic focus using advanced dynamic statistical parametric mapping with magnetoencephalography in a patient with MRI-negative focal cortical dysplasia type IIB

Won Seok Chang, Midori Nakajima, Ayako Ochi, Elysa Widjaja, James T. Rutka, Ivanna Yau, Shiro Baba, and Hiroshi Otsubo

Advanced dynamic statistical parametric mapping (AdSPM) with magnetoencephalography (MEG) was used to identify MRI-negative epileptogenic lesions in this report. A 15-year-old girl had MRI-negative and pharmacology-resistant focal-onset epilepsy. She experienced two types of seizures. Type I consisted of her arousal from sleep, staring, and a forced head-turning movement to the left, followed by secondary generalization. Type II began with an aura of dizziness followed by staring and postictal headache with fatigue. Scalp video-electroencephalography (EEG) captured two type I seizures originating from the right frontocentral region. MEG showed scattered dipoles over the right frontal region. AdSPM identified the spike source at the bottom of the right inferior frontal sulcus. Intracranial video-EEG captured one type I seizure, which originated from the depth electrode at the bottom of the sulcus and correlated with the AdSPM spike source. Accordingly, the patient underwent resection of the middle and inferior frontal gyri, including the AdSPM-identified spike source. Histopathological examination revealed that the patient had focal cortical dysplasia type IIB. To date, the patient has been seizure free for 2 years while receiving topiramate treatment. This is the first preliminary report to identify MRI-negative epilepsy using AdSPM. Further investigation of AdSPM would be valuable for cases of MRI-negative focal epilepsy.

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Phase-amplitude coupling of interictal fast activities modulated by slow waves on scalp EEG and its correlation with seizure outcomes of disconnection surgery in children with intractable nonlesional epileptic spasms

Takehiro Uda, Ichiro Kuki, Takeshi Inoue, Noritsugu Kunihiro, Hiroharu Suzuki, Hiroshi Uda, Toshiyuki Kawashima, Kosuke Nakajo, Yoko Nakanishi, Shinsuke Maruyama, Takashi Shibata, Hiroshi Ogawa, Shin Okazaki, Hisashi Kawawaki, Kenji Ohata, Takeo Goto, and Hiroshi Otsubo

OBJECTIVE

Epileptic spasms (ESs) are classified as focal, generalized, or unknown onset ESs. The classification of ESs and surgery in patients without lesions apparent on MRI is challenging. Total corpus callosotomy (TCC) is a surgical option for diagnosis of the lateralization and possible treatment for ESs. This study investigated phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) of fast activity modulated by slow waves on scalp electroencephalography (EEG) to evaluate the strength of the modulation index (MI) before and after disconnection surgery in children with intractable nonlesional ESs. The authors hypothesize that a decreased MI due to surgery correlates with good seizure outcomes.

METHODS

The authors studied 10 children with ESs without lesions on MRI who underwent disconnection surgeries. Scalp EEG was obtained before and after surgery. The authors collected 20 epochs of 3 minutes each during non–rapid eye movement sleep. The MI of the gamma (30–70 Hz) amplitude and delta (0.5–4 Hz) phase was obtained in each electrode. MIs for each electrode were averaged in 4 brain areas (left/right, anterior/posterior quadrants) and evaluated to determine the correlation with seizure outcomes.

RESULTS

The median age at first surgery was 2.3 years (range 10 months–9.1 years). Two patients with focal onset ESs underwent anterior quadrant disconnection (AQD). TCC alone was performed in 5 patients with generalized or unknown onset ESs. Two patients achieved seizure freedom. Three patients had residual generalized onset ESs. Disconnection surgeries in addition to TCC consisted of TCC + posterior quadrant disconnection (PQD) (1 patient); TCC + AQD + PQD (1 patient); and TCC + AQD + hemispherotomy (1 patient). Seven patients became seizure free with a mean follow-up period of 28 months (range 5–54 months). After TCC, MIs in 4 quadrants were significantly lower in the 2 seizure-free patients than in the 6 patients with residual ESs (p < 0.001). After all 15 disconnection surgeries in 10 patients, MIs in the 13 target quadrants for each disconnection surgery that resulted in freedom from seizures were significantly lower than in the 26 target quadrants in patients with residual ESs (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

In children with nonlesional ESs, PAC for scalp EEG before and after disconnection surgery may be a surrogate marker for control of ESs. The MI may indicate epileptogenic neuronal modulation of the interhemispheric corpus callosum and intrahemispheric subcortical network for ESs. TCC may be a therapeutic option to disconnect the interhemispheric modulation of epileptic networks.

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Utility of diffusion tensor imaging studies linked to neuronavigation and other modalities in repeat hemispherotomy for intractable epilepsy

Erin N. Kiehna, Elysa Widjaja, Stephanie Holowka, O. Carter Snead III, James Drake, Shelly K. Weiss, Ayako Ochi, Eric M. Thompson, Cristina Go, Hiroshi Otsubo, Elizabeth J. Donner, and James T. Rutka

OBJECT

Hemispherectomy for unilateral, medically refractory epilepsy is associated with excellent long-term seizure control. However, for patients with recurrent seizures following disconnection, workup and investigation can be challenging, and surgical options may be limited. Few studies have examined the role of repeat hemispherotomy in these patients. The authors hypothesized that residual fiber connections between the hemispheres could be the underlying cause of recurrent epilepsy in these patients. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to test this hypothesis, and to target residual connections at reoperation using neuronavigation.

METHODS

The authors identified 8 patients with recurrent seizures following hemispherectomy who underwent surgery between 1995 and 2012. Prolonged video electroencephalography recordings documented persistent seizures arising from the affected hemisphere. In all patients, DTI demonstrated residual white matter association fibers connecting the hemispheres. A repeat craniotomy and neuronavigation-guided targeted disconnection of these residual fibers was performed. Engel class was used to determine outcome after surgery at a minimum of 2 years of follow-up.

RESULTS

Two patients underwent initial hemidecortication and 6 had periinsular hemispherotomy as their first procedures at a median age of 9.7 months. Initial pathologies included hemimegalencephaly (n = 4), multilobar cortical dysplasia (n = 3), and Rasmussen's encephalitis (n = 1). The mean duration of seizure freedom for the group after the initial procedure was 32.5 months (range 6–77 months). In all patients, DTI showed limited but definite residual connections between the 2 hemispheres, primarily across the rostrum/genu of the corpus callosum. The median age at reoperation was 6.8 years (range 1.3–14 years). The average time taken for reoperation was 3 hours (range 1.8–4.3 hours), with a mean blood loss of 150 ml (range 50–250 ml). One patient required a blood transfusion. Five patients are seizure free, and the remaining 3 patients are Engel Class II, with a minimum follow-up of 24 months for the group.

CONCLUSIONS

Repeat hemispherotomy is an option for consideration in patients with recurrent intractable epilepsy following failed surgery for catastrophic epilepsy. In conjunction with other modalities to establish seizure onset zones, advanced MRI and DTI sequences may be of value in identifying patients with residual connectivity between the affected and unaffected hemispheres. Targeted disconnection of these residual areas of connectivity using neuronavigation may result in improved seizure outcomes, with minimal and acceptable morbidity.

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Long-term outcomes of epilepsy surgery in 85 pediatric patients followed up for over 10 years: a retrospective survey

Hiroshi Hosoyama, Kazumi Matsuda, Tadahiro Mihara, Naotaka Usui, Koichi Baba, Yushi Inoue, Takayasu Tottori, Toshiaki Otsubo, Yumi Kashida, Koji Iida, Hirofumi Hirano, Ryosuke Hanaya, and Kazunori Arita

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment outcomes and social engagement of patients who had undergone pediatric epilepsy surgery more than 10 years earlier.

METHODS

Between 1983 and 2005, 110 patients younger than 16 years underwent epilepsy surgery at the National Epilepsy Center, Shizuoka Institute of Epilepsy and Neurological Disorders. The authors sent a questionnaire to 103 patients who had undergone follow-up for more than 10 years after surgery; 85 patients (82.5%) responded. The survey contained 4 categories: seizure outcome, use of antiepileptic drugs, social participation, and general satisfaction with the surgical treatment (resection of the epileptic focus, including 4 hemispherectomies). The mean patient age at the time of surgery was 9.8 ± 4.2 (SD) years, and the mean duration of postoperative follow-up was 15.4 ± 5.0 years. Of the 85 patients, 79 (92.9%) presented with a lesional pathology, such as medial temporal sclerosis, developmental/neoplastic lesions, focal cortical dysplasia, and gliosis in a single lobe.

RESULTS

For 65 of the 85 responders (76.5%), the outcome was recorded as Engel Class I (including 15 [93.8%] of 16 patients with medial temporal sclerosis, 20 [80.0%] of 25 with developmental/neoplastic lesions, and 27 [73.0%] of 37 with focal cortical dysplasia). Of these, 29 (44.6%) were not taking antiepileptic drugs at the time of our survey, 29 (44.6%) held full-time jobs, and 33 of 59 patients (55.9%) eligible to drive had a driver's license. Among 73 patients who reported their degree of satisfaction, 58 (79.5%) were very satisfied with the treatment outcome.

CONCLUSIONS

The seizure outcome in patients who underwent resective surgery in childhood and underwent followup for more than 10 years was good. Of 85 respondents, 65 (76.5%) were classified in Engel Class I. The degree of social engagement was relatively high, and the satisfaction level with the treatment outcome was also high. From the perspective of seizure control and social adaptation, resective surgery yielded longitudinal benefits in children with intractable epilepsy, especially those with a lesional pathology in a single lobe.

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Characterizing magnetic spike sources by using magnetoencephalography-guided neuronavigation in epilepsy surgery in pediatric patients

Koji Iida, Hiroshi Otsubo, Yuuri Matsumoto, Ayako Ochi, Makoto Oishi, Stephanie Holowka, Elizabeth Pang, Irene Elliott, Shelly K. Weiss, Sylvester H. Chuang, O. Carter Snead III, and James T. Rutka

Object. The authors sought to validate magnetoencephalography spike sources (MEGSSs) in neuronavigation during epilepsy surgery in pediatric patients.

Methods. The distributions of MEGSSs in 16 children were defined and classified as clusters (Class I), greater than or equal to 20 MEGSSs with 1 cm or less between MEGSSs; small clusters (Class II), 6 to 19 with 1 cm or less between; and scatters (Class III), less than 6 or greater than 1 cm between spike sources. Using neuronavigation, the MEGSSs were correlated to epileptic zones from intra- and extraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG), surgical procedures, disease entities, and seizure outcomes.

Thirteen patients underwent MEGSSs: nine had clusters; two had small clusters, one with and one without clusters; and three had scatters alone. All 13 had scatters. Clusters localized within and extended from areas of cortical dysplasia and at margins of tumors or cystic lesions. All clusters were colocalized to ECoG-defined epileptic zones. Four of six patients with clusters and/or small clusters underwent complete excisions, and two underwent partial excision with or without multiple subpial transections. In the three patients with scatters alone, ECoG revealed epileptic zones buried within MEGSS areas; these regions of scatters were completely excised and treated with multiple subpial transections. Coexisting scatters were left untreated in nine of 10 patients. Postoperatively, nine of 13 patients were seizure free; the four patients with residual seizures had clusters in unresected eloquent cortex. Three patients in whom no MEGSSs were demonstrated underwent lesionectomies and were seizure free.

Conclusions. Magnetoencephalography spike source clusters indicate an epileptic zone requiring complete excision. Coexisting scatters remote from clusters are nonepileptogenic and do not require excision. Scatters alone, however, should be examined by ECoG; an epileptic zone may exist within these distributions.

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Neurosurgical management of frontal lobe epilepsy in children

Clinical article

Shobhan Vachhrajani, Sandrine de Ribaupierre, Hiroshi Otsubo, Ayako Ochi, Shelly K. Weiss, Elizabeth J. Donner, Elysa Widjaja, Elizabeth Kerr, Mary Lou Smith, James Drake, O. Carter Snead III, and James T. Rutka

Object

Pediatric frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) remains a challenging condition for neurosurgeons and epileptologists to manage. Postoperative seizure outcomes remain far inferior to those observed in temporal lobe epilepsies, possibly due to inherent difficulties in delineating and subsequently completely resecting responsible epileptogenic regions. In this study, the authors review their institutional experience with the surgical management of FLE and attempt to find predictors that may help to improve seizure outcome in this population.

Methods

All surgically treated cases of intractable FLE from 1990 to 2008 were reviewed. Demographic information, preoperative and intraoperative imaging and electrophysiological investigations, and follow-up seizure outcome were assessed. Inferential statistics were performed to look for potential predictors of seizure outcome.

Results

Forty patients (20 male, 20 female) underwent surgical management of FLE during the study period. Patients were an average of 5.6 years old at the time of FLE onset and 11.7 years at the time of surgery; patients were followed for a mean of 40.25 months. Most patients displayed typical FLE semiology. Twenty-eight patients had discrete lesions identified on MRI. Eight patients underwent 2 operations. Cortical dysplasia was the most common pathological diagnosis. Engel Class I outcome was obtained in 25 patients (62.5%), while Engel Class II outcome was observed in 5 patients (12.5%). No statistically significant predictors of outcome were found.

Conclusions

Control of FLE remains a challenging problem. Favorable seizure outcome, obtained in 62% of patients in this series, is still not as easily obtained in FLE as it is in temporal lobe epilepsy. While no statistically significant predictors of seizure outcome were revealed in this study, patients with FLE continue to require extensive workup and investigation to arrive at a logical and comprehensive neurosurgical treatment plan. Future studies with improved neuroimaging and advanced invasive monitoring strategies may well help define factors for success in this form of epilepsy that is difficult to control.

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Magnetoencephalography-guided resection of epileptogenic foci in children

Clinical article

Gregory W. Albert, George M. Ibrahim, Hiroshi Otsubo, Ayako Ochi, Cristina Y. Go, O. Carter Snead III, James M. Drake, and James T. Rutka

Object

Resective surgery is increasingly used in the management of pediatric epilepsy. Frequently, invasive monitoring with subdural electrodes is required to adequately map the epileptogenic focus. The risks of invasive monitoring include the need for 2 operations, infection, and CSF leak. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and outcomes of resective epilepsy surgery guided by magnetoencephalography (MEG) in children who would have otherwise been candidates for electrode implantation.

Methods

The authors reviewed the records of patients undergoing resective epilepsy surgery at the Hospital for Sick Children between 2001 and 2010. They identified cases in which resections were based on MEG data and no intracranial recordings were performed. Each patient's chart was reviewed for presentation, MRI findings, MEG findings, surgical procedure, pathology, and surgical outcome.

Results

Sixteen patients qualified for the study. All patients had localized spike clusters on MEG and most had abnormal findings on MRI. Resection was carried out in each case based on the MEG data linked to neuronavigation and supplemented with intraoperative neuromonitoring. Overall, 62.5% of patients were seizure free following surgery, and 20% of patients experienced an improvement in seizures without attaining seizure freedom. In 2 cases, additional surgery was performed subsequently with intracranial monitoring in attempts to obtain seizure control.

Conclusions

MEG is a viable alternative to invasive monitoring with intracranial electrodes for planning of resective surgery in carefully selected pediatric patients with localization-related epilepsy. Good candidates for this approach include patients who have a well-delineated, localized spike cluster on MEG that is concordant with findings of other preoperative evaluations and patients with prior brain pathologies that make the implantation of subdural and depth electrodes somewhat problematic.

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Magnetoencephalography helps delineate the extent of the epileptogenic zone for surgical planning in children with intractable epilepsy due to porencephalic cyst/encephalomalacia

Clinical article

Odeya Bennett-Back, Ayako Ochi, Elysa Widjaja, Shohei Nambu, Akio Kamiya, Cristina Go, Sylvester Chuang, James T. Rutka, James Drake, O. Carter Snead III, and Hiroshi Otsubo

Object

Porencephalic cyst/encephalomalacia (PC/E) is a brain lesion caused by ischemic insult or hemorrhage. The authors evaluated magnetoencephalography (MEG) spike sources (MEGSS) to localize the epileptogenic zone in children with intractable epilepsy secondary to PC/E.

Methods

The authors retrospectively studied 13 children with intractable epilepsy secondary to PC/E (5 girls and 8 boys, age range 1.8–15 years), who underwent prolonged scalp video-electroencephalography (EEG), MRI, and MEG. Interictal MEGSS locations were compared with the ictal and interictal zones as determined from scalp video-EEG.

Results

Magnetic resonance imaging showed PC/E in extratemporal lobes in 3 patients, within the temporal lobe in 2 patients, and in both temporal and extratemporal lobes in 8 patients. Magnetoencephalographic spike sources were asymmetrically clustered at the margin of PC/E in all 13 patients. One cluster of MEGSS was observed in 11 patients, 2 clusters in 1 patient, and 3 clusters in 1 patient. Ictal EEG discharges were lateralized and concordant with MEGSS in 8 patients (62%). Interictal EEG discharges were lateralized and concordant with MEGSS hemisphere in 9 patients (69%). Seven patients underwent lesionectomy in addition to MEGSS clusterectomy with (2 patients) and without (5 patients) intracranial video-EEG. Temporal lobectomy was performed in 1 patient and hemispherectomy in another. Eight of 9 patients achieved seizure freedom following surgery.

Conclusions

Magnetoencephalography delineated the extent of the epileptogenic zone adjacent to PC/E in patients with intractable epilepsy. Complete resection of the MEGSS cluster along with PC/E can provide favorable seizure outcomes.

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Characterizing magnetic spike sources by using magnetoencephalography-guided neuronavigation in epilepsy surgery in pediatric patients

Koji Iida, Hiroshi Otsubo, Yuuri Matsumoto, Ayako Ochi, Makoto Oishi, Stephanie Holowka, Elizabeth Pang, Irene Elliott, Shelly K. Weiss, Sylvester H. Chuang, O. Carter Snead III, and James T. Rutka

Object

The authors sought to validate magnetoencephalography spike sources (MEGSSs) in neuronavigation during epilepsy surgery in pediatric patients.

Methods

The distributions of MEGSSs in 16 children were defined and classified as clusters (Class I), greater than or equal to 20 MEGSSs with 1 cm or less between MEGSSs; small clusters (Class II), 6 to 19 with 1 cm or less between; and scatters (Class III), less than 6 or greater than 1 cm between spike sources. Using neuronavigation, the MEGSSs were correlated to epileptic zones from intra- and extraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG), surgical procedures, disease entities, and seizure outcomes.

Thirteen patients underwent MEGSSs: nine had clusters; two had small clusters, one with and one without clusters; and three had scatters alone. All 13 had scatters. Clusters localized within and extended from areas of cortical dysplasia and at margins of tumors or cystic lesions. All clusters were colocalized to ECoG-defined epileptic zones. Four of six patients with clusters and/or small clusters underwent complete excisions, and two underwent partial excision with or without multiple subpial transections. In the three patients with scatters alone, ECoG revealed epileptic zones buried within MEGSS areas; these regions of scatters were completely excised and treated with multiple subpial transections. Coexisting scatters were left untreated in nine of 10 patients. Postoperatively, nine of 13 patients were seizure free; the four patients with residual seizures had clusters in unresected eloquent cortex. Three patients in whom no MEGSSs were demonstrated underwent lesionectomies and were seizure free.

Conclusions

Magnetoencephalography spike source clusters indicate an epileptic zone requiring complete excision. Coexisting scatters remote from clusters are nonepileptogenic and do not require excision. Scatters alone, however, should be examined by ECoG; an epileptic zone may exist within these distributions.