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Pipeline for uncoilable or failed aneurysms: 3-year follow-up results

Tibor Becske, Matthew B. Potts, Maksim Shapiro, David F. Kallmes, Waleed Brinjikji, Isil Saatci, Cameron G. McDougall, István Szikora, Giuseppe Lanzino, Christopher J. Moran, Henry H. Woo, Demetrius K. Lopes, Aaron L. Berez, Daniel J. Cher, Adnan H. Siddiqui, Elad I. Levy, Felipe C. Albuquerque, David J. Fiorella, Zsolt Berentei, Miklós Marosföi, Saruhan H. Cekirge, and Peter K. Nelson

OBJECTIVE

The long-term effectiveness of endovascular treatment of large and giant wide-neck aneurysms using traditional endovascular techniques has been disappointing, with high recanalization and re-treatment rates. Flow diversion with the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) has been recently used as a stand-alone therapy for complex aneurysms, showing significant improvement in effectiveness while demonstrating a similar safety profile to stent-supported coil treatment. However, relatively little is known about its long-term safety and effectiveness. Here the authors report on the 3-year safety and effectiveness of flow diversion with the PED in a prospective cohort of patients with large and giant internal carotid artery aneurysms enrolled in the Pipeline for Uncoilable or Failed Aneurysms (PUFS) trial.

METHODS

The PUFS trial is a prospective study of 107 patients with 109 aneurysms treated with the PED. Primary effectiveness and safety end points were demonstrated based on independently monitored 180-day clinical and angiographic data. Patients were enrolled in a long-term follow-up protocol including 1-, 3-, and 5-year clinical and imaging follow-up. In this paper, the authors report the midstudy (3-year) effectiveness and safety data.

RESULTS

At 3 years posttreatment, 74 subjects with 76 aneurysms underwent catheter angiography as required per protocol. Overall, complete angiographic aneurysm occlusion was observed in 71 of these 76 aneurysms (93.4% cure rate). Five aneurysms were re-treated, using either coils or additional PEDs, for failure to occlude, and 3 of these 5 were cured by the 3-year follow-up. Angiographic cure with one or two treatments of Pipeline embolization alone was therefore achieved in 92.1%. No recanalization of a previously completely occluded aneurysm was noted on the 3-year angiograms. There were 3 (2.6%) delayed device- or aneurysm-related serious adverse events, none of which led to permanent neurological sequelae. No major or minor late-onset hemorrhagic or ischemic cerebrovascular events or neurological deaths were observed in the 6-month through 3-year posttreatment period. Among 103 surviving patients, 85 underwent functional outcome assessment in which modified Rankin Scale scores of 0–1 were demonstrated in 80 subjects.

CONCLUSIONS

Pipeline embolization is safe and effective in the treatment of complex large and giant aneurysms of the intracranial internal carotid artery. Unlike more traditional endovascular treatments, flow diversion results in progressive vascular remodeling that leads to complete aneurysm obliteration over longer-term follow-up without delayed aneurysm recanalization and/or growth.

Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00777088 (clinicaltrials.gov)

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Treatment of intracranial aneurysms with the Enterprise stent: a multicenter registry

Clinical article

J Mocco, Kenneth V. Snyder, Felipe C. Albuquerque, Bernard R. Bendok, Alan S. Boulos, Jeffrey S. Carpenter, David J. Fiorella, Brian L. Hoh, Jay U. Howington, Brian T. Jankowitz, Kenneth M. Liebma N, Ansaar T. Rai, Rafael Rodriguez-Mercado, Adnan H. Siddiqui, Erol Veznedaroglu, L. Nelson Hopkins, and Elad I. Levy

Object

The development of self-expanding stents dedicated to intracranial use has significantly widened the applicability of endovascular therapy to many intracranial aneurysms that would otherwise have been untreatable by endovascular techniques. Recent Food and Drug Administration approval of the Enterprise Vascular Reconstruction Device and Delivery System (Cordis) has added a new option for self-expanding stent-assisted intracranial aneurysm coiling.

Methods

The authors established a collaborative registry across multiple institutions to rapidly provide largevolume results regarding initial experience in using the Enterprise in real-world practice. Ten institutions (University at Buffalo, Thomas Jefferson University, University of Florida, Cleveland Clinic, Northwestern University, West Virginia University, University of Puerto Rico, Albany Medical Center Hospital, the Neurological Institute of Savannah, and the Barrow Neurological Institute) have provided consecutive data regarding their initial experience with the Enterprise.

Results

In total, 141 patients (119 women) with 142 aneurysms underwent 143 attempted stent deployments. The use of Enterprise assistance with aneurysm coiling was associated with a 76% rate of ≥ 90% occlusion. An inability to navigate or deploy the stent was experienced in 3% of cases, as well as a 2% occurrence of inaccurate deployment. Procedural data demonstrated a 6% temporary morbidity, 2.8% permanent morbidity, and 2% mortality (0.8% unruptured, 12% ruptured).

Conclusions

The authors report initial results of the largest series to date in using the Enterprise for intracranial aneurysm treatment. The Enterprise is associated with a high rate of successful navigation and low occurrence of inaccurate stent deployment. The overall morbidity and mortality rates were low; however, caution should be exercised when considering Enterprise deployment in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage as the authors' experience demonstrated a high rate of associated hemorrhagic complications leading to death.