Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Michael W. McDermott x
  • Refine by Access: all x
  • By Author: Morshed, Ramin A. x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Maria R. H. Castro, Stephen T. Magill, Ramin A. Morshed, Jacob S. Young, Steve E. Braunstein, Michael W. McDermott, and Edward F. Chang

OBJECTIVE

Tumors compressing the trigeminal nerve can cause facial pain, numbness, or paresthesias. Limited data exist describing how these symptoms change after resection and what factors predict symptom improvement. The objective of this study was to report trigeminal pain and sensory outcomes after tumor resection and identify factors predicting postoperative symptom improvement.

METHODS

This retrospective study included patients with tumors causing facial pain, numbness, or paresthesias who underwent resection. Trigeminal schwannomas were excluded. Logistic regression, recursive partitioning, and time-to-event analyses were used to report outcomes and identify variables associated with facial sensory outcomes.

RESULTS

Eighty-six patients met inclusion criteria, and the median follow-up was 3.1 years; 63 patients (73%) had meningiomas and 23 (27%) had vestibular schwannomas (VSs). Meningioma patients presented with pain, numbness, and paresthesias in 56%, 76%, and 25% of cases, respectively, compared with 9%, 91%, and 39%, respectively, for patients with VS. Most meningioma patients had symptoms for less than 1 year (60%), whereas the majority of VS patients had symptoms for 1–5 years (59%). The median meningioma and VS diameters were 3.0 and 3.4 cm, respectively. For patients with meningiomas, gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved in 27% of patients, near-total resection (NTR) in 29%, and subtotal resection (STR) in 44%. For patients with VS, GTR was achieved in 9%, NTR in 30%, and STR in 61%. Pain improved immediately after tumor resection in 81% of patients and in 92% of patients by 6 weeks. Paresthesias improved immediately in 80% of patients, increasing to 84% by 6 weeks. Numbness improved more slowly, with 52% of patients improving immediately, increasing to 79% by 2 years. Pain recurred in 22% of patients with meningiomas and 0% of patients with VSs. After resection, the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) facial pain intensity score improved in 73% of patients. The tumor diameter significantly predicted improvement in BNI score (OR 0.47/cm larger, 95% CI 0.22–0.99; p = 0.047). Complete decompression of the trigeminal nerve was associated with qualitative improvement in pain (p = 0.037) and decreased pain recurrence (OR 0.08, 95% CI 0.01–0.67; p = 0.024).

CONCLUSIONS

Most patients with facial sensory symptoms caused by meningiomas or VSs experienced improvement after resection. Surgery led to immediate and sustained improvement in pain and paresthesias, whereas numbness was slower to improve. Patients with smaller tumors and complete decompression of the trigeminal nerve were more likely to experience improvement in facial pain.

Restricted access

Ramin A. Morshed, Nicole T. Jiam, Elaina J. Wang, Stephen T. Magill, Renata M. Knoll, Elliott D. Kozin, Philip V. Theodosopoulos, Steven W. Cheung, Jeffrey D. Sharon, and Michael W. McDermott

OBJECTIVE

Ménière’s disease is an inner ear disorder classically characterized by fluctuating hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness accompanied by episodic vertigo. While the pathogenesis of Ménière’s remains under debate, histopathological analyses implicate endolymphatic sac dysfunction with inner ear fluid homeostatic dysregulation. Little is known about whether external impingement of the endolymphatic sac by tumors may present with Ménière’s-like symptoms. The authors present a case series of 7 patients with posterior fossa meningiomas that involved the endolymphatic sac and new onset of Ménière’s-like symptoms and review the literature on this rare clinical entity.

METHODS

A retrospective review of patients undergoing resection of a posterior petrous meningioma was performed at the authors’ institution. Inclusion criteria were age older than 18 years; patients presenting with Ménière’s-like symptoms, including episodic vertigo, aural fullness, tinnitus, and/or hearing loss; and tumor location overlying the endolymphatic sac.

RESULTS

There were 7 cases of posterior petrous face meningiomas involving the vestibular aperture presenting with Ménière’s-like symptoms. Imaging and intraoperative examination confirmed no cranial nerve VIII compression or labyrinthine artery involvement accounting for audiovestibular symptoms. Of the 7 patients in the series, 6 experienced significant improvement or resolution of their vertigo, and all 7 had improvement or resolution of their tinnitus after resection. Of the 5 patients who had preoperative hearing loss, 2 experienced improvement or resolution of their ipsilateral preoperative hearing deficit, whereas the other 3 had unchanged hearing loss compared to preoperative evaluation.

CONCLUSIONS

Petrous face meningiomas overlying the endolymphatic sac can present with a Ménière’s syndrome. Early recognition and microsurgical excision of these tumors is critical for resolution of most symptoms and stabilization of hearing loss.

Free access

Stephen T. Magill, Ramin A. Morshed, Calixto-Hope G. Lucas, Manish K. Aghi, Philip V. Theodosopoulos, Mitchel S. Berger, Oreste de Divitiis, Domenico Solari, Paolo Cappabianca, Luigi M. Cavallo, and Michael W. McDermott

OBJECTIVE

Tuberculum sellae meningiomas (TSMs) are surgically challenging tumors that can severely impair vision. Debate exists regarding whether the transcranial (TC) or endoscopic transsphenoidal (TS) approach is best for resecting these tumors, and there are few large series comparing these approaches.

METHODS

A retrospective chart review was performed at 2 academic centers comparing TC and TS approaches with respect to vision, extent of resection, recurrence, and complications. The authors report surgical outcomes and propose a simple preoperative tumor grading scale that scores tumor size (1–2), optic canal invasion (0–2), and arterial encasement (0–2). The authors performed univariate, multivariate, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) to evaluate outcomes.

RESULTS

The TSMs were resected in 139 patients. The median follow-up was 29 months. Ninety-five (68%) cases were resected via a TC and 44 (32%) via a TS approach. Tumors treated via a TC approach had a higher tumor (p = 0.0007), artery (p < 0.0001), and total score (p = 0.0012) on the grading scale. Preoperative visual deficits were present in 87% of patients. Vision improved in 47%, stayed the same in 35%, declined in 10%, and was not recorded in 8%. The extent of resection was 65% gross-total resection, 23% near-total resection (95%–99% resection), and 12% subtotal resection (< 95%). A lower tumor score was significantly associated with better or stable vision postoperatively (p = 0.0052). The RPA confirmed low tumor score as the key predictor of postoperative visual improvement or stability. Multivariate analysis and RPA demonstrate that lower canal score (p < 0.0001) and TC approach (p = 0.0019) are associated with gross-total resection. Complications occurred in 20 (14%) patients, including CSF leak (5%) and infection (4%). There was no difference in overall complication rates between TC and TS approaches; however, the TS approach had more CSF leaks (OR 5.96, 95% CI 1.10–32.04). The observed recurrence rate was 10%, and there was no difference between the TC and TS approaches.

CONCLUSIONS

Tuberculum sellae meningiomas can be resected using either a TC or TS approach, with low morbidity and good visual outcomes in appropriately selected patients. The simple proposed grading scale provides a standard preoperative method to evaluate TSMs and can serve as a starting point for selection of the surgical approach. Higher scores were associated with worsened visual outcomes and subtotal resection, regardless of approach. The authors plan a multicenter review of this grading scale to further evaluate its utility.