Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14 items for

  • Author or Editor: John D. Pickard x
  • Refine by Access: all x
  • By Author: Kirkpatrick, Peter J. x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Ming-Yuan Tseng, Marek Czosnyka, Hugh Richards, John D. Pickard, and Peter J. Kirkpatrick

Object

The authors previously have demonstrated that acute treatment with pravastatin after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can ameliorate vasospasm-related delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DINDs). In the current study, they test the hypothesis that these effects are associated with improvement in indices describing autoregulation of cerebral blood flow.

Methods

In this double-blind study, 80 patients between the ages of 18 and 84 years who had aneurysmal SAH were randomized equally to receive either 40 mg of oral pravastatin or placebo once daily for up to 14 days (medication was started 1.8 ± 1.3 days after ictus). Autoregulation was measured using a daily transient hyperemic response test (THRT) on transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (800 measurements in 80 patients), and data were compared between the pravastatin and placebo groups and between patients with or without vasospasm, DINDs, or unfavorable outcome. Measurement of autoregulation also was performed using the pressure-reactivity index, a moving correlation coefficient between mean arterial and intracranial pressures (Days 0–5, 132 measurements in 32 patients).

There was no difference in baseline autoregulation indices between the trial groups. The members of the pravastatin group not only had a shorter duration of impaired autoregulation but also had stronger transient hyperemic response ratios (THRRs) bilaterally. A negative correlation existed between the mean flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery and THRRs. Onset of DINDs occurred when bilateral autoregulation failed. On Days 3, 4, and 5, the pressure-reactivity index correlated significantly with ipsilateral impaired autoregulation.

Conclusions

The neuroprotective effects of acute treatment with pravastatin following aneurysmal SAH are associated with enhancement of autoregulation. A routine and daily assessment of cerebral autoregulation by using the THRT may help identify patients at high risk of DINDs.

Restricted access

Marek Czosnyka, Basil F. Matta, Piotr Smielewski, Peter J. Kirkpatrick, and John D. Pickard

Object. The authors studied the reliability of a new method for noninvasive assessment of cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) in head-injured patients in which mean arterial blood pressure (ABP) and transcranial Doppler middle cerebral artery mean and diastolic flow velocities are measured.

Methods. Cerebral perfusion pressure was estimated (eCPP) over periods of continuous monitoring (20 minutes—2 hours, 421 daily examinations) in 96 head-injured patients (Glasgow Coma Scale score < 13) who were admitted to the intensive care unit. All patients were sedated, paralyzed, and ventilated. The eCPP and the measured CPP (ABP minus intracranial pressure, measured using an intraparenchymal microsensor) were compared.

The correlation between eCPP and measured CPP was r = 0.73; p < 10−6. In 71% of the examinations, the estimation error was less than 10 mm Hg and in 84% of the examinations, the error was less than 15 mm Hg. The method had a high positive predictive power (94%) for detecting low CPP (< 60 mm Hg). The eCPP also accurately reflected changes in measured CPP over time (r > 0.8; p < 0.001) in situations such as plateau and B waves of intracranial pressure, arterial hypotension, and refractory intracranial hypertension. A good correlation was found between the average measured CPP and eCPP when day-by-day variability was assessed in a group of 41 patients (r = 0.71).

Conclusions. Noninvasive estimation of CPP by using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography may be of value in situations in which monitoring relative changes in CPP is required without invasive measurement of intracranial pressure.

Restricted access

Peter J. Kirkpatrick, Piotr Smielewski, Marek Czosnyka, David K. Menon, and John D. Pickard

✓ A multimodality recording system was used in 14 ventilated patients with closed head injury to assess the potential use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in the neurointensive care unit. Signals of intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, peripheral oxygen saturation, jugular venous saturation, and NIRS-derived changes in the chromophores of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin were digitized and recorded. After a review of 886 hours of continuous monitoring, 376 hours were considered free from artifact and were entered for final analysis. In nine of the patients 38 events were recorded that demonstrated clear changes in cerebral perfusion pressure accompanied by hemodynamic changes in middle cerebral artery flow velocity (transcranial Doppler) and cortical perfusion (laser Doppler flowmetry). Near-infrared spectroscopy showed correlated changes in 37 events (97%) whereas jugular venous saturation monitoring registered only 20 (53%). There was associated peripheral oxygen desaturation in eight cases (21%), intracranial hypertension in 10 (26%), and cerebral hyperemia in eight (21%). The remaining 12 events (32%) appeared to be complex changes of uncertain origin. Iatrogenic factors were identified as causative in 14 cases (37%). The potential application of NIRS in adults and the importance of using multiple parameter recording systems in the interpretation of cerebral events are discussed.

Restricted access

Peter J. Kirkpatrick, Pietr Smielewski, Peter C. Whitfield, Marik Czosnyka, David Menon, and John D. Pickard

✓ Near-infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor changes in the cerebral oxygenation state in 13 patients during carotid endarterectomy. Variations in the levels of the chromophores (oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2), deoxygenated hemoglobin (Hb), and oxidized cytochrome (CytO2)), and the total hemoglobin content (tHb) were compared with changes in middle cerebral artery flow velocity measured using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. Of eight patients who showed a fall in flow velocity on application of the internal carotid artery cross-clamp, seven demonstrated a rapid and closely correlated fall in HbO2 signal, and an increase in Hb. Levels of CytO2 and tHb remained unchanged. During endarterectomy, recovery of the HbO2 and Hb levels toward preclamp baseline values occurred in three of these patients. Intraoperative shunts accelerated recovery of HbO2 and Hb signals in two of three individuals. Release of the internal carotid cross-clamp resulted in a rapid increase in HbO2 and decrease in Hb signal in those patients in whom spontaneous recovery had not occurred; in five instances, a hyperemia evolved with raised flow velocity and HbO2 to above baseline values. Cross-clamping and subsequent reperfusion of the external carotid artery had no effect on any parameter measured. The authors conclude that near-infrared spectroscopy can register changes in cerebral oxygenation during carotid endarterectomy without significant contamination from extracranial tissues.

Restricted access

Ming-Yuan Tseng, Peter J. Hutchinson, Carole L. Turner, Marek Czosnyka, Hugh Richards, John D. Pickard, and Peter J. Kirkpatrick

Object

The authors previously demonstrated that acute pravastatin therapy in patients after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) ameliorates vasospasm-related delayed ischemic neurological deficits. The object of this study was to continue to examine potential mechanisms of these beneficial effects.

Methods

Eighty patients with aneurysmal SAH (age range 18–84 years; time to onset 1.8 ± 1.3 days) were enrolled in a double-blind study and randomized to receive 40 mg of oral pravastatin or placebo daily for as long as 14 days. Daily transcranial Doppler ultrasonography and blood tests every 3 days (including full blood cell counts, coagulation profiles, fasting glucose and lipid profiles, and serum biochemistry) were performed during the trial period.

Results

No significant differences were found in baseline laboratory data between the trial groups. Subsequent measurements during the 14-day trial showed reduced low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels and total/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratios between Days 3 and 15 (p < 0.05), and increased D-dimer levels (p < 0.05) on Day 6, in the pravastatin group. Patients who received pravastatin but developed vasospasm had significantly lower baseline LDL cholesterol levels or a less extensive reduction in LDL cholesterol levels (p < 0.05), and greater increases in plasma fibrinogen (p = 0.009) and serum C-reactive protein on Day 3 (p = 0.007), compared with those patients without vasospasm. The reduction in LDL cholesterol levels on Day 3 in the placebo group correlated with the duration of normal cerebral autoregulation on the ipsilateral side of the ruptured aneurysm (p = 0.002).

Conclusions

In addition to functioning through a cholesterol-independent pathway, cerebrovascular protection from acute statin therapy following aneurysmal SAH may also function through cholesterol-dependent mechanisms.

Restricted access

Ming-Yuan Tseng, Pippa G. Al-Rawi, Marek Czosnyka, Peter J. Hutchinson, Hugh Richards, John D. Pickard, and Peter J. Kirkpatrick

Object

Systemic administration of 23.5% hypertonic saline enhances cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with poor-grade spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Whether the increment of change in CBF correlates with changes in autoregulation of CBF or outcome at discharge remains unknown.

Methods

Thirty-five patients with poor-grade spontaneous SAH received 2 ml/kg 23.5% hypertonic saline intravenously, and they underwent bedside transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography and intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. Seventeen of them underwent Xe-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scanning for measuring CBF. Outcome was assessed using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at discharge from the hospital. The data were analyzed using repeated-measurement analysis of variance and Dunnett correction. A comparison was made between patients with favorable and unfavorable outcomes using multivariate logistic regression.

Results

The authors observed a maximum increase in blood pressure by 10.3% (p <0.05) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) by 21.2% (p <0.01) at 30 minutes, followed by a maximum decrease in ICP by 93.1% (p <0.01) at 60 minutes. Changes in ICP and CPP persisted for longer than 180 and 90 minutes, respectively. The results of TCD ultrasonography showed that the baseline autoregulation was impaired on the ipsilateral side of ruptured aneurysm, and increments in flow velocities were higher and lasted longer on the contralateral side (48.75% compared with 31.96% [p = 0.045] and 180 minutes compared with 90 minutes [p <0.05], respectively). The autoregulation was briefly impaired on the contralateral side during the infusion. A dose-dependent effect of CBF increments on favorable outcome was seen on Xe-CT scans (mRS Score 1–3, odds ratio 1.27 per 1 ml/100 g tissue × min, p = 0.045).

Conclusions

Bolus systemic hypertonic saline therapy may be used for reversal of cerebral ischemia to normal perfusion in patients with poor-grade SAH.

Restricted access

Marek Czosnyka, Piotr Smielewski, Stefan Piechnik, Eric A. Schmidt, Pippa G. Al-Rawi, Peter J. Kirkpatrick, and John D. Pickard

Object. Plateau waves of intracranial pressure (ICP) are often recorded during intensive care monitoring of severely head injured patients. They are traditionally interpreted as meaningful secondary brain insults because of the dramatic decrease in cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). The aim of this study was to investigate both the hemodynamic profile and the clinical consequences of plateau waves.

Methods. One hundred sixty head-injured patients were studied using continuous monitoring of ICP; almost 20% of these patients exhibited plateau waves. In 96 patients arterial pressure, ICP, and transcranial Doppler (TCD) blood flow velocity were studied daily for 20 minutes to 3 hours. Sixteen episodes of plateau waves in eight patients were recorded and analyzed.

The dramatic increase in ICP was followed by a profound fall in CPP (by 45%). In contrast, flow velocity fell by only 20%. Autoregulation was documented to be intact both before and after plateau but was disturbed during the wave (p < 0.05). Pressure-volume compensatory reserve was always depleted before the wave. Cerebrovascular resistance decreased during the wave by 60% (p <0.05) and TCD pulsatility increased (p <0.05). Plateau waves did not increase the probability of an unfavorable outcome following injury.

Conclusions. The authors have confirmed that the plateau waves are a hemodynamic phenomenon associated with cerebrovascular vasodilation. They are observed in patients with preserved cerebral autoregulation but reduced pressure-volume compensatory reserve.

Restricted access

Rupert Kett-White, Peter J. Hutchinson, Pippa G. Al-Rawi, Marek Czosnyka, Arun K. Gupta, John D. Pickard, and Peter J. Kirkpatrick

Object. The aim of this study was to investigate potential episodes of cerebral ischemia during surgery for large and complicated aneurysms, by examining the effects of arterial temporary clipping and the impact of confounding variables such as blood pressure and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage.

Methods. Brain tissue PO2, PCO2, and pH, as well as temperature and extracellular glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and glutamate were monitored in 46 patients by using multiparameter sensors and microdialysis. Baseline data showed that brain tissue PO2 decreased significantly, below a mean arterial pressure (MAP) threshold of 70 mm Hg. Further evidence of its relationship with cerebral perfusion pressure was shown by an increase in mean brain tissue PO2 after drainage of CSF from the basal cisterns (Wilcoxon test, p < 0.01). Temporary clipping was required in 31 patients, with a mean total duration of 14 minutes (range 3–52 minutes), causing brain tissue PO2 to decrease and brain tissue PCO2 to increase (Wilcoxon test, p < 0.01). In patients in whom no subsequent infarction developed in the monitored region, brain tissue PO2 fell to 11 mm Hg (95% confidence interval 8–14 mm Hg). A brain tissue PO2 level below 8 mm Hg for 30 minutes was associated with infarction in any region (p < 0.05 according to the Fisher exact test); other parameters were not predictive of infarction. Intermittent occlusions of less than 30 minutes in total had little effect on extracellular chemistry. Large glutamate increases were only seen in two patients, in both of whom brain tissue PO2 during occlusion was continuously lower than 8 mm Hg for longer than 38 minutes.

Conclusions. The brain tissue PO2 decreases with hypotension, and, when it is below 8 mm Hg for longer than 30 minutes during temporary clipping, it is associated with increasing extracellular glutamate levels and cerebral infarction.

Restricted access

Ming-Yuan Tseng, Peter J. Hutchinson, Hugh K. Richards, Marek Czosnyka, John D. Pickard, Wendy N. Erber, Stephen Brown, and Peter J. Kirkpatrick

Object

Delayed ischemic deficits (DIDs), a major source of disability following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), are usually associated with severe cerebral vasospasm and impaired autoregulation. Systemic erythropoietin (EPO) therapy has been demonstrated to have neuroprotective properties acting via EPO receptors on cerebrovascular endothelia and ischemic neurons. In this trial, the authors explored the potential neuroprotective effects of acute EPO therapy following aSAH.

Methods

Within 72 hours of aSAH, 80 patients (age range 24–82 years) were randomized to receive intravenous EPO (30,000 U) or placebo every 48 hours for a total of 90,000 U. Primary end points were the incidence, duration, and severity of vasospasm and impaired autoregulation on transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. Secondary end points were incidence of DIDs and outcome at discharge and at 6 months.

Results

Randomization characteristics were balanced except for age, with the EPO group being older (mean age 59.6 vs 53.3 years, p = 0.034). No differences were demonstrated in the incidence of vasospasm and adverse events; however, patients receiving EPO had a decreased incidence of severe vasospasm from 27.5 to 7.5% (p = 0.037), reduced DIDs with new cerebral infarcts from 40.0 to 7.5% (p = 0.001), a shortened duration of impaired autoregulation (ipsilateral side, p < 0.001), and more favorable outcome at discharge (favorable Glasgow Outcome Scale score, p = 0.039). Among the 71 survivors, the EPO group had fewer deficits measured with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (median Score 2 vs 6, p = 0.008).

Conclusions

This preliminary study showed that EPO seemed to reduce delayed cerebral ischemia following aSAH via decreasing severity of vasospasm and shortening impaired autoregulation.

Restricted access