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Joseph C. Noggle, Daniel M. Sciubba, Clarke Nelson, Giannina L. Garcés-Ambrossi, Edward Ahn, and George I. Jallo

Object

Treatments for brain abscesses have typically involved invasive craniotomies followed by debridement. These methods often require large incisions with vast exposure and may be associated with high morbidity rates. For supraorbital lesions of the anterior and middle cranial fossa, minimally invasive craniotomies may limit exposure and decrease surgically related morbidity while allowing adequate debridement and decompression. The authors report their experience in treating frontal epidural abscesses in pediatric patients through minimally invasive supraciliary craniotomies over a 4-year period.

Methods

Three pediatric patients with frontal epidural abscesses underwent minimally invasive debridement procedures. Each procedure consisted of a supraciliary incision and a small craniotomy to expose the abscess. All patients underwent pre- and postoperative radiological evaluation including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Data were collected on preoperative characteristics, operative management, and postoperative outcomes.

Results

Two patients were male and 1 patient was female. The ages of the patients ranged from 6 to 10 years (mean 8 years). A frontal abscess was diagnosed in all patients, and all were treated surgically without perioperative complications. Microbes cultured postoperatively included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in 2 patients and Staphylococcus viridans in 1 patient. The mean follow-up duration was 12.3 months. No neurological or vascular complications were noted during follow-up. All patients were treated with antibiotics postoperatively and experienced resolution of symptoms and excellent outcomes.

Conclusions

Frontal epidural abscesses can be adequately and safely debrided via a minimally invasive supraciliary craniotomy. This approach has a cosmetic benefit and may decrease approach-related morbidity.

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Giannina L. Garcés-Ambrossi, Matthew J. McGirt, Roger Samuels, Daniel M. Sciubba, Ali Bydon, Ziya L. Gokaslan, and George I. Jallo

Object

Although postsurgical neurological outcomes in patients with tethered cord syndrome (TCS) are well known, the rate and development of neurological improvement after first-time tethered cord release is incompletely understood. The authors reviewed their institutional experience with the surgical management of adult TCS to assess the time course of symptomatic improvement, and to identify the patient subgroups most likely to experience improvement of motor symptoms.

Methods

The authors retrospectively reviewed 29 consecutive cases of first-time adult tethered cord release. Clinical symptoms of pain and motor and urinary dysfunction were evaluated at 1 and 3 months after surgery, and then every 6 months thereafter. Rates of improvement in pain and motor or urinary dysfunction over time were identified, and presenting factors associated with improvement of motor symptoms were assessed using a multivariate survival analysis (Cox model).

Results

The mean patient age was 38 ± 13 years. The causes of TCS included lipomyelomeningocele in 3 patients (10%), tight filum in 3 (10%), lumbosacral lipoma in 4 (14%), intradural tumor in 3 (10%), previous lumbosacral surgery in 2 (7%), and previous repair of myelomeningocele in 14 (48%). The mean ± SD duration of symptoms before presentation was 5 ± 7 months. Clinical presentation included diffuse pain/parasthesias in both lower extremities in 13 patients (45%), or perineal distribution in 18 (62%), lower extremity weakness in 17 (59%), gait difficulties in 17 (59%), and bladder dysfunction in 14 (48%). Laminectomy was performed in a mean of 2.5 ± 0.7 levels per patient, and 9 patients (30%) received duraplasty. At 18 months postoperatively, 47% of patients had improved urinary symptoms, 69% had improved lower extremity weakness and gait, and 79% had decreased painful dysesthesias. Median time to symptomatic improvement was least for pain (1 month), then motor (2.3 months), and then urinary symptoms (4.3 months; p = 0.04). In patients demonstrating improvement, 96% improved within 6 months of surgery. Only 4% improved beyond 1-year postoperatively. In a multivariate analysis, the authors found that patients who presented with asymmetrical lower extremity weakness (p = 0.0021, hazard ratio 5.7) or lower extremity hyperreflexia (p = 0.037, hazard ratio = 4.1) were most likely to experience improvement in motor symptoms.

Conclusions

In the authors' experience, pain and motor and urinary dysfunction improve postoperatively in the majority of patients. The rate of symptomatic improvement was greatest for pain resolution, followed by motor, and then urinary improvement. Patients who experienced improvement in any symptom had done so by 6 months after tethered cord release. Patients with asymmetrical motor symptoms or lower extremity hyperreflexia at presentation were most likely to experience improvements in motor symptoms. These findings may help guide patient education and surgical decision-making.

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Giannina L. Garcés-Ambrossi, Matthew J. McGirt, Vivek A. Mehta, Daniel M. Sciubba, Timothy F. Witham, Ali Bydon, Jean-Paul Wolinksy, George I. Jallo, and Ziya L. Gokaslan

Object

With the introduction of electrophysiological spinal cord monitoring, surgeons have been able to perform radical resection of intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCTs). However, factors associated with tumor resectability, tumor recurrence, and long-term neurological outcome are poorly understood.

Methods

The authors retrospectively reviewed 101 consecutive cases of IMSCT resection in adults and children at a single institution. Neurological function and MR images were evaluated preoperatively, at discharge, 1 month after surgery, and every 6 months thereafter. Factors associated with gross-total resection (GTR), progression-free survival (PFS), and long-term neurological improvement were assessed using multivariate regression analysis.

Results

The mean age of the patients was 41 ± 18 years and 17 (17%) of the patients were pediatric. Pathological type included ependymoma in 51 cases, hemangioblastoma in 15, pilocytic astrocytoma in 16, WHO Grade II astrocytoma in 10, and malignant astrocytoma in 9. A GTR was achieved in 60 cases (59%). Independent of histological tumor type, an intraoperatively identifiable tumor plane (OR 25.3, p < 0.0001) and decreasing tumor size (OR 1.2, p = 0.05) were associated with GTR. Thirty-four patients (34%) experienced acute neurological decline after surgery (associated with increasing age [OR 1.04, p = 0.02] and with intraoperative change in motor evoked potentials [OR 7.4, p = 0.003]); in 14 (41%) of these patients the change returned to preoperative baseline within 1 month. In 31 patients (31%) tumor progression developed by last follow-up (mean 19 months). Tumor histology (p < 0.0001) and the presence of an intraoperatively identified tumor plane (hazard ratio [HR] 0.44, p = 0.027) correlated with improved PFS. A GTR resulted in improved PFS for hemangioblastoma (HR 0.004, p = 0.04) and ependymoma (HR 0.2, p = 0.02), but not astrocytoma. Fifty-five patients (55%) maintained overall neurological improvement by last follow-up. The presence of an identifiable tumor plane (HR 3.1, p = 0.0004) and improvement in neurological symptoms before discharge (HR 2.3, p = 0.004) were associated with overall neurological improvement by last follow-up (mean 19 months).

Conclusions

Gross-total resection can be safely achieved in the vast majority of IMSCTs when an intraoperative plane is identified, independent of pathological type. The incidence of acute perioperative neurological decline increases with patient age but will improve to baseline in nearly half of patients within 1 month. Long-term improvement in motor, sensory, and bladder dysfunction may be achieved in a slight majority of patients and occurs more frequently in patients in whom a surgical plane can be identified. A GTR should be attempted for ependymoma and hemangioblastoma, but it may not affect PFS for astrocytoma. For all tumors, the intraoperative finding of a clear tumor plane of resection carries positive prognostic significance across all pathological types.