Transnasal odontoid resection followed by posterior decompression and occipitocervical fusion in children with Chiari malformation Type I and ventral brainstem compression

Report of 2 cases

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  • 1 Department of Neurosurgery, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons,
  • 2 Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York;
  • 3 Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Presbyterian, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and
  • 4 Department of Neurosurgery, Scott and White Neurosciences Institute, Texas A&M College of Medicine, Temple, Texas
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Object

In rare cases, children with a Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) suffer from concomitant, irreducible, ventral brainstem compression that may result in cranial neuropathies or brainstem dysfunction. In these circumstances, a 360° decompression supplemented by posterior stabilization and fusion is required. In this report, the authors present the first experience with using an endoscopic transnasal corridor to accomplish ventral decompression in children with CM-I that is complicated by ventral brainstem compression.

Methods

Two children presented with a combination of occipital headaches, swallowing dysfunction, myelopathy, and/or progressive scoliosis. Imaging studies demonstrated CM-I with severely retroflexed odontoid processes and ventral brainstem compression. Both patients underwent an endoscopic transnasal approach for ventral decompression, followed by posterior decompression, expansive duraplasty, and occipital-cervical fusion.

Results

In both patients the endoscopic transnasal approach provided excellent ventral access to decompress the brainstem. When compared with the transoral approach, endoscopic transnasal access presents 4 potential advantages: 1) excellent prevertebral exposure in patients with small oral cavities; 2) a surgical corridor located above the hard palate to decompress rostral pathological entities more easily; 3) avoidance of the oral trauma and edema that follows oral retractor placement; and 4) avoidance of splitting the soft or hard palate in patients with oral-palatal dysfunction from ventral brainstem compression.

Conclusions

The endoscopic transnasal approach is atraumatic to the oral cavity, and offers a more superior region of exposure when compared with the standard transoral approach. Depending on their comfort level with endoscopic surgical techniques, pediatric neurosurgeons should consider this approach in children with pathological entities requiring ventral brainstem decompression.

Abbreviation used in this paper: CM-I = Chiari malformation Type I.

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Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to: Todd C. Hankinson, M.D., M.B.A., Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Children's Hospital of Alabama, University of Alabama Birmingham, 1600 7th Avenue South, ACC Suite 400, Birmingham, Alabama 35233. email: tch12@columbia.edu.
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