A hospital-based analysis of pseudomeningoceles after elective craniotomy in children: what predicts need for intervention?

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  • 1 College of Medicine and
  • 2 Departments of Pediatrics and
  • 3 Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis;
  • 4 Children’s Foundation Research Institute, Memphis;
  • 5 Rhodes College, Memphis;
  • 6 Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis;
  • 7 Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital, Memphis; and
  • 8 Semmes Murphey, Memphis, Tennessee
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OBJECTIVE

In pediatric patients, the development of a postoperative pseudomeningocele after an elective craniotomy is not unusual. Most will resolve with time, but some may require intervention. In this study, the authors analyzed patients who required intervention for a postoperative pseudomeningocele following an elective craniotomy or craniectomy and identified factors associated with the need for intervention.

METHODS

An institutional operative database of elective craniotomies and craniectomies was queried to identify all surgeries associated with development of a postoperative pseudomeningocele from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2017. Demographic and surgical data were collected, as were details regarding postoperative events and interventions during either the initial admission or upon readmission. A bivariate analysis was performed to compare patients who underwent observation with those who required intervention.

RESULTS

Following 1648 elective craniotomies or craniectomies, 84 (5.1%) clinically significant pseudomeningoceles were identified in 82 unique patients. Of these, 58 (69%) of the pseudomeningoceles were diagnosed during the index admission (8 of which persisted and resulted in readmission), and 26 (31%) were diagnosed upon readmission. Forty-nine patients (59.8% of those with a pseudomeningocele) required one or more interventions, such as lumbar puncture(s), lumbar drain placement, wound exploration, or shunt placement or revision. Only race (p < 0.01) and duraplasty (p = 0.03, OR 3.0) were associated with the need for pseudomeningocele treatment.

CONCLUSIONS

Clinically relevant pseudomeningoceles developed in 5% of patients undergoing an elective craniotomy, with 60% of these pseudomeningoceles needing some form of intervention. The need for intervention was associated with race and whether a duraplasty was performed.

ABBREVIATIONS ETV = endoscopic third ventriculostomy.

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Contributor Notes

Correspondence Paul Klimo Jr.: Semmes Murphey, Memphis, TN. pklimo@semmes-murphey.com.

INCLUDE WHEN CITING Published online January 31, 2020; DOI: 10.3171/2019.11.PEDS19227.

Disclosures The authors report no conflict of interest concerning the materials or methods used in this study or the findings specified in this paper.

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