Editorial Board: Journal of Neurosurgery

Kevin Cockroft, Co-Chair

Kevin M. Cockroft, MD, MSc, FAANS, FACS, FAHA is Director of Cerebrovascular and Endovascular Neurosurgery in the Department of Neurosurgery at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine. He is also co-Director of the Penn State Hershey Stroke Center and Director of the Neurosurgery Department’s Neuroendovascular Fellowship Training Program. Dr. Cockroft holds the academic rank of professor with joint appointments in Neurosurgery, Radiology and Public Health Sciences. Dr. Cockroft received his undergraduate education at The Johns Hopkins University and his MD degree from Cornell University. He did his residency training at The New York Presbyterian Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. Dr. Cockroft completed fellowship training in neurovascular microsurgery at Stanford University and endovascular neurosurgery (interventional neuroradiology) at Thomas Jefferson University. He also holds a Master of Science degree in Public Health Sciences from Penn State University.

Dr. Cockroft’s clinical and research interests include, brain aneurysms and subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as AVMs of the central nervous system and occlusive cerebrovascular disease. He is or has been the principal investigator on several clinical trials and he has been an author or co-author on numerous scientific articles and book chapters. He has previously served as the President of the Pennsylvania Neurosurgical Society. He is currently Chair of the AANS/CNS Joint Guidelines Committee and Chair-Elect of the Joint Cerebrovascular Section of the AANS/CNS. He also serves on the board of directors of the Intrasocietal Commission for the Accreditation of Carotid Stenting Facilities. Dr. Cockroft has had the honor of being named to the Consumers’ Research Council of America’s Guide to America’s Top Physicians & Surgeons and Best Doctors Incorporated’s Best Doctors in America.

Dr. Cockroft joined the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2015.

 

Randy Jensen, Co-Chair

Dr. Randy Jensen is currently Professor of Neurosurgery, Radiation Oncology and Oncological Sciences at the University of Utah. He serves as Residency Program Director. He completed a dual major in Chemistry and Biology at the University of Utah. He and his wife Elizabeth were classmates at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Upon graduation he began a residency in Neurological Surgery at Loyola University of Chicago. During this time he was awarded a Ph.D. in Neuroscience with research emphasis on meningioma signal transduction and biology. Following residency, he accepted a faculty position at the University of Utah where he as been since 1998.

Dr. Jensen co-directs the brain tumor group at the Huntsman Cancer Institute. His clinical work focuses in the surgical management of intracranial tumors and stereotactic radio surgery. He has special interest in preoperative and intraoperative cortical mapping and imaging for resection of tumors in eloquent areas of the brain. His laboratory interests are the role of hypoxia in brain tumor growth and angiogenesis, animal models of pseudo progression, and preclinical models of meningioma. He has authored over 130 peer-reviewed scientific and clinical publications. He has received the Journal of Neuro-oncology Award, the CNS Mahaley Clinical Research Award, and the Tumor Young Investigator Award.

Dr. Jensen has been involved in organized neurosurgery serving on a number of committees for the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, executive board of the Joint Tumor Section, and past president of the Rocky Mountain Neurosurgery Society. He has directed the Lende Winter Neurosurgery Meeting for the past 10 years. He has served on the editorial boards of Neuro Oncology, Surgical Neurology International, Journal of Radiosurgery and SBRT, and Contemporary Neurosurgery. He has been an ad hoc reviewer for an additional 25 journals, the NIH and American Cancer Society.

Dr. Jensen joined the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2015.

 

Michael A. Vogelbaum, Co-Chair

Michael A. Vogelbaum, MD, PhD, is Professor of Neurosurgery at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Associate Director of the Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center (BTNC) and Director of the BTNC’s Center for Translational Therapeutics at the Cleveland Clinic, where he holds the Robert W. and Kathryn B. Lamborn Chair in Neuro-Oncology. He received his MD and PhD (Biomedical Engineering) from University of Virginia and completed his residency in neurosurgery at Barnes-Jewish Hospital/Washington University in St. Louis.

In addition to his active neurosurgery and radiosurgery practice, Dr. Vogelbaum has been primary investigator of numerous local and national clinical trials of new drugs and surgical techniques and devices for brain tumors. He has an externally funded basic science and translational research laboratory that currently focuses on immunobiology of brain tumors and on various aspects of drug delivery to brain tumors. He is currently developing novel devices for delivering therapeutics directly to the brain, for which he has received multiple patents. The first of these devices has been introduced into clinical trials. He is the co-founder and chief medical officer of Infuseon Therapeutics, Inc., a company that was spun-off from Cleveland Clinic Innovations to commercialize his therapeutic delivery devices.

Dr. Vogelbaum is a founder of the RANO (Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology) group, chair of the Neurosurgery Committee for NRG Oncology, and he has been a vice president of the Society for NeuroOncology. He is a member of the editorial board for the journals Neuro-Oncology and Neurosurgery, Tumor Section co-editor of World Neurosurgery and he is co-editor of the comprehensive textbook on neuro-oncology, Principles and Practice of Neuro-Oncology (2011).

Dr. Vogelbaum joined the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2016.

 

Michael G Kaplitt

Michael G. Kaplitt, MD, PhD received his undergraduate degree in molecular biology magna cum laude from Princeton University, where he also received a certificate of proficiency in Russian studies. He went on to complete a PhD in molecular neurobiology from The Rockefeller University, followed his MD from Cornell University Medical College. After his neurological surgery residency at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, he completed a fellowship in stereotactic and functional neurosurgery at the University of Toronto. He then joined the faculty at Weill Cornell Medical College, where he is currently vice-chairman for Research and Residency Director in the Department of Neurological Surgery.

Dr. Kaplitt has long been a leader in the field of gene therapy, having written the seminal paper in the field in 1994, demonstrating the effectiveness of adeno-associated virus as a gene transfer agent in the brain. In 2003, he performed the first adult human in vivo gene therapy for neurological disease, and he directed the first successful randomized, double-blind study of CNS gene therapy in 2011. He has been NIH funded throughout most of his career, in addition to receiving funding from the Department of Defense, Michael J. Fox Foundation, JPB Foundation, and many other major private foundations. His current research interests focus on using novel gene therapy approaches to understand and treat Parkinson’s disease, depression, drug addiction, and pain. He is clinically active as Director of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, focusing primarily upon the treatment of movement disorders, pain, and hydrocephalus, and he has directed or participated in several clinical trials in these areas. He was a full member of the NINDS NSD-K clinical trials study section and is an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Society for Neurological Surgeons.

Dr. Kaplitt joined the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2016.

 

Howard A. Riina

Dr. Howard A. Riina is Professor of Neurosurgery, Neurology and Radiology; Vice Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery; Director of the Neurosurgery Residency Training Program; and Director of Endovascular Neurosurgery at New York University School of Medicine and NYU Langone Medical Center. He was born in Brooklyn, New York. He received undergraduate degrees from both Franklin and Marshall College and the University of Pennsylvania in a dual-degree, 5-year bioengineering program in 1987. He graduated from Temple University School of Medicine in 1993. Between his third and forth years of medical school, he obtained an M.Phil. in biology (molecular neurobiology) from the University of Cambridge. He completed his surgical internship and trained in neurological surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania with Drs. Eugene S. Flamm and M. Sean Grady. Dr. Riina has completed fellowship experience in Diagnostic Neuroradiology with Robert Grossman, M.D., at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. In addition he completed two formal fellowships: interventional neuroradiology, with Alejandro Berenstein, M.D., at the Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery Beth Israel Medical Center, and cerebrovascular and skull base surgery, with Robert F. Spetzler, M.D., at the Barrow Neurological Institute. In 2001, Dr. Riina was recruited to Weill Medical College of Cornell University, NewYork-Presbyterian, to perform both open cerebrovascular surgery and interventional neuroradiology; there he was Professor of Neurological Surgery and Radiology and Residency Program Director of the Department of Neurological Surgery. He was Co-Director of Interventional Neuroradiology at NewYork-Presbyterian prior to joining the faculty of the NYU School of Medicine.

Dr. Riina specializes in the surgical and endovascular treatment of cerebrovascular disorders of the brain and spinal cord. He has particular interest in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations of the brain and spinal cord. He has also been involved in new treatments for acute stroke. Most recent interests involve the development of new minimally invasive devices and treatments for cerebrovascular and skull base disorders as well as intraarterial chemotherapy for recurrent malignant brain tumors.

Dr. Riina joined the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2016.

 

Michael Schulder

Michael Schulder, MD, is the Director of the Brain Tumor Center and Vice-Chairman of Neurosurgery at Northwell Health, and Professor of Neurosurgery at the Hofstra Northwell University School of Medicine. He is the Neurosurgical Residency Program Director, and is the Co-Director of the Northwell Health Center for Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Radiation Therapy. He is the former Interim Director of Functional Neurosurgery at Northwell Health.

Dr. Schulder received his MD degree from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University in 1982. He completed his residency training in neurosurgery at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and trained in stereotactic neurooncology at Harvard Medical School and the University of Florida, and in functional neurosurgery at the Oregon Health Sciences University. Dr. Schulder has been the author of numerous peer-reviewed publications and book chapters, and he edited The Handbook of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery. He is the current AANS Historian, the former editor of AANS Neurosurgeon, and an editorial board member of other neurosurgical peer-reviewed journals.

Dr. Schulder was elected to the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2017.

 

Louis Kim

Dr. Louis J. Kim is currently Professor and Vice-Chair in the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Washington School of Medicine. He is also the Chief of Neurological Surgery at Harborview Medical Center and Associate Residency Program Director. He completed his undergraduate degree summa cum laude at Middlebury College, where he was elected to the Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society. He earned his medical degree at Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons with Alpha Omega Alpha honors. Under the tutelage of Drs. Robert Spetzler and Volker Sonntag, Dr. Kim completed his neurosurgery residency and fellowship training in both cerebrovascular/skull base and endovascular neurosurgery at Barrow Neurological Institute. After his clinical training, he joined the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle under the mentorship of Richard Ellenbogen.

Dr. Kim’s clinical practice specializes in the microsurgical and endovascular treatment of aneurysms, AVMs, dural AV fistulas, cavernous malformations, moyamoya disease, and skull base tumors. He is passionate about translational research, including next-generation sequencing of cerebrovascular tissue in pursuit of the pathogenesis of brain aneurysms and AVMs; computation fluid dynamics modeling to predict the efficacy of aneurysm treatment; and novel clinical imaging techniques for cerebral vasospasm, moyamoya disease, and vasculitis. Dr. Kim’s research has been funded with grants from the FDA, Department of Defense, Washington Research Foundation, and NIH, including a recently awarded R01 from the NIH/NINDS.

Dr. Kim holds several patents and pending patents pertaining to surgical robotics and minimally invasive endoscopic neurosurgery. He is also co-founder of Spi Surgical, Inc., a medical device and surgical robotics start-up. Part of this work led to the development and subsequent FDA approval of an endonasal pathway protection device known as Spiway, which is in clinical use today.

Dr. Kim has published over 100 peer-reviewed articles in the areas of cerebral aneurysms, AVMs, dural AV fistulas, cavernous malformations, and complex microsurgical and endovascular technique. He has written numerous book chapters and editorials. He has been an invited lecturer and teacher throughout North and South America, Asia, and Europe. Dr. Kim was elected to the Editorial Board of Journal of Neurosurgery in 2017.

 

Sepideh Amin-Hanjani

Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani received her medical degree at Harvard Medical School and completed neurosurgery residency training at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, followed by a Cerebrovascular and Skull Base fellowship at the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix, Arizona. She is currently tenured Professor and Residency Program Director in the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), where she serves as Co-Director of Neurovascular Surgery, with clinical work focused on treatment of cerebrovascular disease. Her longstanding research interests lie in the area of cerebrovascular blood flow and stroke, and she has held NIH funding as PI for a multi-site international study of blood flow in vertebrobasilar disease.

She is an active contributor to several national committees, including serving as the Vice-Chair of the AANS/ CNS Joint Guidelines Review Committee, and the Scientific Statements Oversight Committee of the American Heart Association Stroke Council. She has previously served as Chair of the AANS/CNS Cerebrovascular Section, and as a Member at Large of the CNS Executive Committee. Dr Amin-Hanjani became a Diplomate of the American Board of Neurological Surgery in 2004; she is also an elected member of the Society of Neurological Surgeons, the American Academy of Neurological Surgery and Society of University Neurosurgeons, a Fellow of the American Heart Association and American College of Surgeons, and serves as a Medical Advisory Board Regional Co-Director for the Brain Aneurysm Foundation. She has authored over 150 publications and 25 book chapters, and she participates in editorial review for multiple journals.

Dr. Amin-Hanjani was elected to the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2018.

 

Lynda Yang

Dr. Lynda Yang received her medical research training through the NIH-Medical Scientist Training Program at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. She received her neurosurgery training from the University of Michigan and completed further peripheral nerve and brachial plexus surgery training with Dr. David Kline (LSU), Dr. Rolfe M. Birch (Orthopedics, Royal National Orthopedic Trust, UK), and Dr. Martijn Malessy (Neurosurgery, Leiden University Medical Center, NL). Dr. Yang’s research interests currently involve the furthering of evidence-based practice in peripheral nerve and brachial plexus surgery.

Dr. Yang is currently Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery and Director of the Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Program at the University of Michigan. She has served as Chairperson for the AANS/CNS Peripheral Nerve Division and in the organizational leadership in national and international peripheral nerve societies. She serves as member and/or past-chairperson on the Neurological Devices Advisory Panel in the Center for Devices and Radiological Health of the FDA.

Dr. Yang was elected to the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2018.

 

Dr. John A. Jane Jr.

Dr. John A. Jane Jr. is currently Professor of Neurosurgery and Pediatrics; Director of Pediatric Neurosurgery; Director of the Neuroendocrine Program; and Director of the Neurosurgery Residency Training Program at the University of Virginia. He received his B.A. at the University of Chicago, where he graduated with honors in 1992. He attended medical school at the University of Virginia, where he also completed his neurosurgical residency in 1997. After spending a year as a Fellow in Neurosurgery at Auckland Hospital in Auckland, New Zealand, he returned to UVA to finish his chief year in neurosurgery in 2003 with John A. Jane Sr. He then completed a pediatric neurosurgery fellowship, acting as the Chief Fellow of Pediatric Neurosurgery, at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto with Dr. James M. Drake.

In 2004 Dr. Jane Jr. joined the faculty at the University of Virginia as Assistant Professor and was named Director of the Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, a practice that he shared with his father, John A. Jane Sr. In 2007, he was named Co-Director of the Neuroendocrine Program. He was promoted to Associate Professor in 2008, attained tenure in 2012, and became Professor in 2015. He became Director of the Neurosurgery residency training program in 2014.

In addition to his pediatric practice, Dr. Jane has a strong clinical and academic interest in the treatment of patients with pituitary and parasellar tumors, an interest that began under the tutelage of Dr. Edward R. Laws Jr. and continued with his colleague Dr. Edward H. Oldfield. He is an author of over 130 peer-reviewed publications on a variety of topics, including pituitary adenomas, craniopharyngiomas, craniosynostosis, Chiari malformations, hydrocephalus, and neurosurgical education and training.

Dr. Jane Jr. was elected to the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2018.

 

Mark Hamilton

Dr. Mark Hamilton obtained his Bachelor of Science degree (with distinction) at the University of Toronto and then graduated from McGill University Medical School in 1983. He did his Neurosurgery Residency at the University of Calgary and received his FRCSC in 1991. He did fellowship training in cerebrovascular, skull base and pediatric neurosurgery at the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix, Arizona, and joined the University of Calgary Department of Clinical Neurosciences in 1994, where he is currently a Professor of Neurosurgery with additional appointments in the Department of Surgery and the Department of Pediatrics. He was the Chief of the Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery from 2002 to 2011. He is head of the University of Calgary Adult Hydrocephalus Program, which he established, along with the University of Calgary Adult Hydrocephalus Clinic, in 2008. Dr. Hamilton is the chair of the Adult Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network (AHCRN), which has eight clinical sites in three countries; President-Elect of the Hydrocephalus Society (International Society for Hydrocephalus and Cerebrospinal Fluid Disorders [ISHCSF]); and a member of the Board of Directors of the Hydrocephalus Association (HA) and the Medical Advisory Board (MAB) of the HA, as well a member of the Board of Directors of Hydrocephalus Canada. His current main clinical and research interests are the diagnosis and management of hydrocephalus in adults.

Dr. Hamilton was elected to the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2018.

 

Justin F. Fraser

Dr. Fraser graduated from Princeton University with a degree from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. His Princeton thesis discussed the American healthcare system, focusing upon the effect of managed care on the physician-patient relationship. He obtained his medical degree from the Weill Medical College of Cornell University. He completed residency in neurological surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College, where he also completed a fellowship in endovascular neurosurgery/interventional neuroradiology. He is currently Associate Professor and Director of Cerebrovascular Surgery in the Department of Neurological Surgery at University of Kentucky, where he specializes in cerebrovascular, endovascular, skull base, and endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery. As Surgical Director of the University of Kentucky Comprehensive Stroke Center, he focuses on treating stroke, carotid stenosis, intracranial aneurysms, arteriovenous malformation, pituitary tumors, and other skull base tumors. His academic research focuses upon the further advancement of the neuroprotective therapies for acute ischemic stroke. He has been Principal Investigator on several investigator-initiated clinical studies (eg. SAVER-I, STABILISER, MAVARIC), as well as a site-PI for multiple industry-led clinical trials. In the UK Center for Advanced Translational Stroke Science, Dr. Fraser leads a research team that has built an ongoing tissue bank for evaluating molecular and cellular changes in acute stroke patients.

Dr. Fraser was elected to the Editorial Board of Journal of Neurosurgery in 2018.

 

Rose Du, MD

Rose Du, MD, PhD, is Professor of Neurosurgery and Director of Cerebrovascular Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School. She received her BA (summa cum laude) in physics from Harvard University. She subsequently entered Harvard Medical School’s MD/PhD program and received her PhD in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she studied protein folding. She completed her internship and residency at the University of California at San Francisco, after which she undertook a cerebrovascular fellowship with Dr. Arthur Day at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She subsequently joined the faculty at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Dr. Du’s research interests include the genetics of stroke and cerebral aneurysms, as well as other cerebrovascular diseases. Her research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, as well as by several private foundations. She has more than 150 scientific publications and currently serves on the editorial boards of Neurosurgery, Stroke, and Translational Stroke Research. Dr. Du was elected to the editorial board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2019.

 

Judy Huang, MD

Dr. Judy Huang is Professor and Vice Chair of Neurosurgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. In addition, she serves as Director of the Neurosurgery Residency Program and Director of the Cerebrovascular Surgery Fellowship.

After graduating magna cum laude from Brown University, she received her MD from the Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons. Her neurosurgery residency training was completed at the Neurological Institute of New York.

Dr. Huang’s clinical and research interests are devoted primarily to arteriovenous malformations, aneurysms, and ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. She has won awards for excellence in teaching and clinical care. She has authored numerous peer-reviewed publications and book chapters and serves on the editorial board of Neurosurgery. Dr. Huang is often invited to lecture at international and national conferences. She has served on several committees of the SNS, AANS, and CNS, and as Secretary of the Neurosurgical Society of America, and is an ABNS Examiner. Dr. Huang was elected to the editorial board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2019.

 

Anthony M. Kaufmann, MD

Dr. Kaufmann received his MD, BSc (Medicine), and MSc (Surgery) from the University of Manitoba, where he also completed his neurosurgery residency. He then joined the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (1994–1997) before returning to Canada, at the University of Calgary (1997–2000) and then the University of Manitoba (2001–present). In addition to specialization in cerebrovascular and cranial base microneurosurgery, he is Director of both the Winnipeg Centres for Cranial Nerve Disorders and GammaKnife Surgery, as a well as Supervisor of the Intra-Operative Monitoring Program.

Dr. Kaufmann is board certified by both the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (1994) and the American Board of Neurosurgical Surgeons (2017). He served on the Neurosurgery Examination Committee for the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (2013–2017). Dr. Kaufmann was elected to the editorial board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2019.

 

Gabriel Zada, MD

Dr. Gabriel Zada is an Associate Professor of Neurosurgery, Otolaryngology, and Internal Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC. He attended UC Berkeley for his undergraduate studies and medical school at UC San Francisco. He then went on to complete his residency at USC, under the mentorship of Dr. Martin Weiss and Dr. Steven Giannotta. He completed a fellowship in endoscopic pituitary and skull base surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital with Dr. Edward Laws. He joined the USC faculty in 2011 and currently serves as Director of the USC Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery Program, Co-Director of the USC Pituitary Center, and Co-Director of the USC Stereotactic Radiosurgery Program. He is the Associate Program Director of the USC Neurosurgery Residency Program.

Dr. Zada has a keen clinical and academic interest in brain and skull base tumor surgery and has published more than 150 peer-reviewed articles on various topics, mostly relating to brain/pituitary tumors, skull base surgery, neuroendoscopy, simulation-based education, and stereotactic radiosurgery. He coauthored and edited the textbook entitled The Atlas of Sellar and Parasellar Lesions. He is an independent NIH-funded principal investigator, whose research laboratory at the USC Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute focuses on the genomics and epigenetics of pituitary tumors and meningiomas. Dr. Zada also serves on the editorial board of Neurosurgery and the Journal of Neuro-Oncology. Dr. Zada was elected to the editorial board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2019.

 

Julie Pilitsis

Julie G. Pilitsis, MD, PhD, is a Professor of Neurosurgery and Neuroscience at Albany Medical College and Chair for the Department of Neuroscience and Experimental Therapeutics. She completed her neurosurgery residency at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan, where she also obtained a PhD in neurophysiology and became active in both basic science and translational research. Dr. Pilitsis has served on the Board of Directors and Scientific Committees for several national organizations. With the support of the North American Neuromodulation Society (NANS) Board of Directors, she began the NANS Women in Neuromodulation Section, where she was the first chair and currently serves as senior advisor. Dr. Pilitsis maintains an NIH-sponsored research program focused on device optimization for neuromodulation and has published more than 100 journal articles, four books, and numerous chapters. She serves on the editorial board of several noteworthy publications and sits on multiple NIH study sections.

 

Manish Aghi

Manish Aghi, MD, PhD, is a Professor and Vice Chair of Neurosurgery at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He attended Stanford University for his undergraduate studies and completed MD-PhD degrees at Harvard University. He then went on to complete his residency at Massachusetts General Hospital. He joined the UCSF faculty in 2008 and currently serves as Director of the Center for Minimally Invasive Skull Base Surgery, Head of the Education Division and Clerkship Director in the Department of Neurosurgery, and a Principal Investigator in the Brain Tumor Research Center. Dr. Aghi runs a basic science laboratory studying the brain tumor microenvironment that has been continuously NIH funded since joining the UCSF faculty. He has published nearly 200 peer-reviewed basic science and clinical articles focused on brain tumors. He was elected to the American Academy of Neurological Surgery in 2016 and served as Chair of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons (AANS/CNS) Joint Section on Tumors from 2018 to 2020. Dr. Aghi also serves on the editorial board of Neurosurgery and the Journal of Neuro-Oncology. Dr. Aghi was elected to the editorial board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2020.

 

Andrew Carlson

Andrew Carlson, MD, MS-CR, is a faculty neurosurgeon at the University of New Mexico. Born in Los Alamos, New Mexico, Dr. Carlson trained at the University of New Mexico and did fellowships in endovascular neurosurgery at the University of Illinois–Chicago and skull base/vascular at the University of South Florida, ultimately returning to practice in the only tertiary care center for neurosurgery in New Mexico. He is the Director of Research in Neurosurgery and Director of Cerebrovascular and Neurointerventional Surgery. He is the Co-Director of the New Mexico Spreading Depolarization Consortium. Nationally, Dr. Carlson is an active reviewer for the Joint Guidelines Review Committee and also serves on the multispecialty American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) Neurocritical Care Examination Writing Committee. He has published many peer-reviewed articles and is centrally involved in multiple clinical trials. He is NIH funded for clinical research focused on secondary brain injury and spreading depolarizations. Dr. Carlson was elected to the editorial board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2020.

 

Elizabeth B. Claus

Elizabeth B. Claus, MD, PhD, is a Professor and Director of Medical Research in the Yale University School of Public Health as well as Attending Neurosurgeon and Director of Stereotactic Radiosurgery within the Department of Neurosurgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. She received her undergraduate degree from Wellesley College, a master’s degree in mathematics from the University of Virginia, and her MD-PhD from Yale University. Dr. Claus trained as a neurosurgeon at Yale–New Haven Hospital and completed a fellowship in neurosurgical oncology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She is a member of the Council of Medical Advisors for the American Brain Tumor Association (ABTA) as well as the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS). Dr. Claus’ research is focused on cancer and genetic epidemiology with an emphasis on the development of risk models for breast and brain tumors. She is the overall Principal Investigator of the Meningioma Consortium, the Meningioma Genome-Wide Association Study, and the Yale Acoustic Neuroma Study as well as a co-investigator of the GLIOGENE (Genes for Glioma) and International Glioma Case/Control (GICC) projects. In partnership with national patient brain tumor organizations including the ABTA, the Acoustic Neuroma Association (ANA), and the National Brain Tumor Society (NBTS), Dr. Claus is working to develop cost- and time-efficient web-based recruitment strategies to be used in the study of brain tumors, including the Yale Acoustic Neuroma Study and the International Low Grade Glioma Registry. Dr. Claus was elected to the editorial board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2020.

 

William Mack

William Mack, MD, is a Professor of Neurosurgery, Vice Chair of Academic Affairs, and a faculty member of the Neuroscience Graduate Program at University of Southern California. His area of clinical focus is endovascular and open surgical management of patients with cerebrovascular disease. Dr. Mack received his bachelor’s degree with honors from Cornell University. He then attended Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, where he graduated from medical school and completed neurosurgical residency training. Following residency, Dr. Mack completed an Interventional Neuroradiology fellowship at UCLA. Dr. Mack is the Principal Investigator and Director of the Cerebrovascular Laboratory in the Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute. His overarching academic goal is to examine the effects of inflammation/air pollution in experimental models of cerebrovascular disease. Dr. Mack is the Principal Investigator on active NIH (NINDS, NIA, and NIEHS) grants. He also serves as an Associate Editor of the Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery and an Editorial Board member for World Neurosurgery. Dr. Mack serves on the Board of Directors of the Society of Neurointerventional Surgery and Executive Committee of the Joint Cerebrovascular Section of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons/American Association of Neurological Surgeons. Dr. Mack was elected to the editorial board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2020.

 

Daniel M. Prevedello

Daniel M. Prevedello, MD, is currently Professor of Neurosurgery and Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Co-Director of the Comprehensive Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery Center and Director of the Minimally Invasive Cranial Surgery Program at The Ohio State University, Wexner Medical Center and Comprehensive Cancer Center–Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. Dr. Prevedello is also Co-Director of the Anatomy Laboratory Toward Visuospatial Surgical Innovations in Otolaryngology and Neurosurgery (ALT-VISION) at The Ohio State University. Dr. Prevedello attended medical school at the Universidade Federal do Parana in Curitiba, Brazil, where he also completed his neurological surgery residency at the Hospital Nossa Senhora das Graças. He completed a fellowship in neuroendocrine and pituitary surgery at the University of Virginia and another in skull base and cerebrovascular surgery at the University of Pittsburgh. In 2008 Dr. Prevedello joined the Faculty at the University of Pittsburgh as Assistant Professor and was named Director of the Skull Base Surgery Training Program. In 2010 he moved to The Ohio State University, where he became Associated Professor in 2012. As the Director of the Minimally Invasive Cranial Surgery Program and Co-Director of the Comprehensive Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery, Dr. Prevedello was promoted to Professor with Tenure of The Ohio State University in 2017. Dr. Prevedello has a particular clinical and academic interest in brain and skull base tumor surgery and has published more than 250 peer-reviewed articles on various topics mostly related to brain and skull base tumors, skull base reconstruction, neuroendoscopy, and novel techniques and technologies. Dr. Prevedello also serves on the editorial boards of Operative Neurosurgery, World Neurosurgery, and Frontiers in Neurology/Oncology. Dr. Prevedello was elected to the editorial board of the Journal of Neurosurgery in 2020.