Editorial Board: JNS: Pediatrics

Shenandoah Robinson, MD Co-Chair

Shenandoah (Dody) Robinson is Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurology (PAR) at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a pediatric neurosurgeon in the Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She received her undergraduate and medical education from Northwestern University, and her neurosurgical training at Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Robinson completed her pediatric neurosurgical fellowship at St. Louis Children’s Hospital and Washington University. While at Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital she became Professor of Neurosurgery and Neuroscience at CWRU. She joined the faculty at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard University in 2011, and moved to Johns Hopkins University in May 2016. Her clinical practice includes treating the complications of early brain insults including spasticity and other movement disorders, epilepsy and hydrocephalus.

Dr. Robinson’s basic and translational research has focused on the mechanisms and repair of perinatal brain injury. Her laboratory described the loss of markers of GABAergic signaling and cation-chloride transporters in human infants born preterm with white matter injury. She and her colleagues developed clinically-relevant models of encephalopathy of prematurity and infantile traumatic brain injury. A major effort has been directed towards understanding how erythropoietin and other neuroprotective agents may be used in the neonatal period to optimize recovery after brain insults. Her clinical research has focused on problems related to perinatal brain injury, including the management of post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus of prematurity, abusive head trauma and cerebral palsy. She was elected to the Editorial Board of Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics in 2013.

 

Abhaya V. Kulkarni, MD, PhD Co-Chair

Dr. Abhaya V. Kulkarni is a pediatric neurosurgeon and Professor of Surgery at Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, a Senior Scientist at the SickKids Research Institute, and Program Director for the Neurosurgery Residency Program at the University of Toronto. He obtained his MD from the University of Toronto in 1994 and graduated in 2002 from the Toronto Neurosurgery Residency Program. He then completed his PhD in Clinical Epidemiology at McMaster University. After a pediatric neurosurgery fellowship at Hopital Necker Enfants Malades in Paris, he began his faculty appointment at Hospital for Sick Children in 2003. Dr. Kulkarni’s research focuses on health outcome assessments in pediatric neurosurgery, with special emphasis on hydrocephalus. He is a site investigator for the North American Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network and has received research funding from several national and international funding agencies. He serves on the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the AANS/CNS. Dr. Kulkarni has published over 130 peer-reviewed manuscripts on a range of topics in neurosurgery. He was elected to the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics editorial board in 2013.

 

Howard L. Weiner, MD

Howard L. Weiner, MD is currently the Chief of Neurosurgery at Texas Children’s Hospital and Professor and Vice Chairman of Neurosurgery at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. He relocated to Houston in May, 2016 after nearly 27 years spent at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York, where he arrived as a surgical intern in 1989. He is a Diplomate of the American Boards of Neurological Surgery and Pediatric Neurological Surgery, and cares for all aspects of pediatric neurosurgery at NYU. His clinical and research interests have included novel approaches in epilepsy surgery, Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, and pediatric brain tumors. He has published on these topics, has been invited to speak both in the US and abroad, has been consistently named in Castle Connolly, NY Magazine, and the NY Times Top Doctors lists, and was a recipient of the Van Wagenen Fellowship from the AANS. A prior research grant recipient from the NIH and foundations to study childhood brain tumors and epilepsy, Dr. Weiner graduated with highest academic standing in his class from both the University of Pennsylvania and Cornell University Medical College. He completed neurosurgical training at NYU under Chairman Dr. Patrick Kelly and a pediatric neurosurgery fellowship at NYU. In 1996, he was awarded the Van Wagenen Fellowship by the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, to study brain development in Paris, in the laboratory of Professor Nicole Le Douarin.

Dr. Weiner was elected to the Editorial Board of Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics in 2014.

 

P. David Adelson, MD

Dr. P. David Adelson is the Director of Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, the Diane and Bruce Halle Endowed Chair for Pediatric Neurosciences in Phoenix, AZ and the Chief of Pediatric Neurosurgery/ Children’s Neurosciences at Phoenix Children's Hospital. He is an Adjunct Professor in the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering at Arizona State University and a Clinical Professor at the University of Arizona - College of Medicine- Phoenix. He was previously the A. Leland Albright Professor of Neurosurgery/ Pediatric Neurosurgery and Vice Chairman for Research for the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh and Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh prior to moving to Phoenix in 2009. Dr. Adelson received his BA then MD from Columbia University and completed his neurosurgical residency at UCLA in 1993. Following his residency, he entered the fellowship in pediatric neurosurgery at the Children’s Hospital of Boston and Harvard Medical School, finishing in 1994 prior to joining the faculty in Pittsburgh. Dr. Adelson is a nationally and internationally recognized expert in the area of pediatric brain, spine/ spinal cord, and peripheral nerve injury, in particular the acute clinical management of traumatically brain injured children as well as neural recovery and plasticity of the developing brain following injury. He continues to run an active basic science laboratory along with clinical research programs, most recently leading the NIH Funded Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury Consortium through both Phase II and Phase III clinical trials on hypothermia following severe traumatic brain injury in children. In his time in Phoenix, he began a Children’s Neuroscience Institute that eventually allied with St. Joseph’s Hospital and assume leadership of Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children's Hospital to become one of the top pediatric neuroscience programs in the country. He has been the recipient of multiple awards, including The Best Doctors in America (Top 1%), Surgeon of the Year (Phoenix), and Congress of Neurological Surgeons Clinical Investigation Award, to name but a few. His research has resulted in his authoring more than 160 publications in refereed journals, 36 book chapters and has edited 8 books including the well regarded “Principles and Practice of Pediatric Neurosurgery,” the authoritative textbook in the field of pediatric neurosurgery, now in its 3rd Edition.

Dr. Adelson was elected to the Editorial Board of Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics in 2014.

 

Douglas L. Brockmeyer, MD

Dr. Douglas L. Brockmeyer was born and raised in southern California and obtained his undergraduate degree from Harvard University. During this time he played football and rowed heavyweight crew for the Crimson. He attended medical school at Case Western Reserve University graduating in 1987. He completed his surgical internship and neurosurgery residency at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, finishing in 1993. He was recruited to Primary Children’s Medical Center in Salt Lake City as an Assistant Professor in Neurosurgery in 1994. He became full Professor in 2005. He served as Director of the Pediatric Neurosurgery Fellowship at the University of Utah and also served as the Residency Program Director. He is currently the Chief of the Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery and holds the Marion L. Walker Endowed Chair at the University of Utah.

Dr. Brockmeyer has fostered a practice in general pediatric neurosurgery, but has specifically concentrated on disorders of the pediatric craniovertebral junction. He has spoken at conferences worldwide and has published numerous articles and books regarding the topic, including the book Advanced Pediatric Craniocervical Surgery. He has been a visiting professor at more than a dozen academic institutions.

Dr. Brockmeyer is a member of multiple neurosurgical societies, including the CNS, AANS and ASPN. He is the founding member of the Pediatric Craniocervical Society, an organization devoted to education and research of pediatric craniocervical disorders.

Dr. Brockmeyer joined the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics in 2015.

 

Cormac Maher, MD

Dr. Cormac Maher is a pediatric neurosurgeon at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan where he also serves as Vice-Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery for Clinical Research, Outcomes, and Safety. Dr. Maher completed his surgical internship and neurosurgical residency at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. He then completed fellowship training in pediatric neurosurgery at Boston Children’s Hospital and cerebrovascular neurosurgery at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts.

Dr. Maher is an active clinician-investigator and has authored over 100 peer-reviewed articles and 20 book chapters on a wide variety of neurosurgical topics. His research focuses on improving our understanding the epidemiology of conditions that are commonly evaluated and treated by pediatric neurosurgeons. He is a member of the University of Michigan Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation. He holds board certification from the American Board of Neurological Surgery and the American Board of Pediatric Neurological Surgery. He is a director of the Accreditation Council for Pediatric Neurosurgery Fellowships. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American College of Surgeons, and the American Association of Neurological Surgeons.

Dr. Maher joined the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics in 2015.

 

Nalin Gupta, MD

Dr. Nalin Gupta is Professor of Neurological Surgery and Pediatrics at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) and Chief of the Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital. He received his medical degree from, and completed his residency at, the University of Toronto. His graduate work, completed at UCSF, focused on the role of radiation in tumor cell growth. His current research interests include the interaction between tumor cells and the host microenvironment, fetal surgery for myelomeningocele, and clinical trials for patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas. He holds board certification from the American Board of Neurological Surgery, the American Board of Pediatric Neurological Surgery and is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

Dr. Gupta joined the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics in 2016.

 

Matthew D. Smyth, MD

Dr. Matthew D. Smyth is a Professor of Neurological Surgery and Pediatrics at Washington University and St. Louis Children’s Hospital, and he is the Director of the Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery Program and the neurosurgeon for the Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Institute at St. Louis Children’s Hospital. He obtained his undergraduate degree in Neurobiology and Behavior at Cornell University in 1992. He obtained his medical degree at the University of California, San Francisco, in 1996, where he also completed his residency in neurosurgery, in 2002. In 2003, Dr. Smyth completed a fellowship in pediatric neurosurgery at the Children’s Hospital of Alabama/University of Alabama at Birmingham. He joined the faculty at Washington University in St. Louis in 2003. His clinical and research interests focus on techniques and outcomes related to pediatric epilepsy surgery, craniofacial surgery including endoscopic techniques, laser-ablation, and minimally invasive robot-assisted surgery, hydrocephalus, Chiari malformations, and brain tumors. Additional research interests include advanced functional imaging in pediatric epilepsy, genetic correlates of craniosynostosis, and the development of novel devices for the treatment of refractory epilepsy with focal brain cooling. He has written over 135 peer-reviewed publications and 20 chapters and has delivered over 200 invited lectures and presentations at national and international meetings and holds 5 patents. He holds board certification from the American Board of Neurological Surgery and the American Board of Pediatric Neurological Surgery. Dr. Smyth is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Dr. Smyth joined the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics in 2016.

 

Andrew Jea, MD

Dr. Jea attended the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, where he obtained a bachelor of science in electrical engineering. He then entered medical school at the University of Miami School of Medicine in Miami, Florida. Dr. Jea completed his residency at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, Florida, his pediatric neurosurgery fellowship at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and his spine fellowship at the University of Miami. After fellowship training, Dr. Andrew Jea joined the pediatric neurosurgery program at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston, Texas, as an attending pediatric neurosurgeon, director of the neuro-spine program and director of the fellowship program. Dr. Jea also pursued a master degree in health administration at Louisiana State University in Shreveport with special interest in quality improvement.

Dr. Jea’s clinical practice includes the breadth of pediatric spinal disorders such as spinal deformities, spinal column tumors, trauma, and congenital anomalies. He has other interests in peripheral nerve disorders, fetal neurosurgery, and spasticity. He has published over 180 peer-reviewed articles and over 30 book chapters, mainly on the topic of pediatric spine.

In 2016, Dr. Jea was recruited by the Indiana University Department of Neurosurgery and Goodman Campbell Brain and Spine in Indianapolis, Indiana, where he is Professor and Chief of Pediatric Neurosurgery at Riley Hospital for Children.

Dr. Jea remains active on the national level as a member of the executive committees of the Section of Neurological Surgery of the American Academy of Pediatrics and AANS/CNS Joint Section on Pediatric Neurological Surgery. Dr. Jea is an active fellow of the Scoliosis Research Society. He has served as an editorial board member for AANS Neurosurgeon, and he serves on the editorial boards of Pediatrics and Operative Neurosurgery.

Dr. Jea was elected to the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics in 2017.

 

Jeffrey P. Blount, MD

Dr. Blount is Professor and Chair of the Section of Pediatric Neurosurgery at Children’s of Alabama and the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). Dr. Blount was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and grew up in the Capital District (Albany) of New York State. He attended Washington and Lee University where he graduated magna cum laude and with membership in Phi Beta Kappa. He graduated from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha. After residency, Dr. Blount served in the US Navy as a staff neurosurgeon at Naval Medical Center, San Diego. Following this he pursued a fellowship in pediatric neurosurgery at the Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto.

Dr. Blount came to Birmingham immediately after fellowship training and has remained there for the duration of his career. He has served at Children’s of Alabama as the Chief of the Medical Staff as well as appointments on the Credentialing Committee, Clinical Outcomes Committee and Quality Assurance Committee. Within the Department of Neurosurgery at UAB, he serves on the Clinical Competency Committee and Faculty Promotion Committee and was appointed Chair of the Pediatric Section in 2017. He is an active member of the AANS, the CNS, the Neurosurgical Society of America, the American Society of Pediatric Neurosurgery, the International Society of Pediatric Neurosurgery, the Pediatric Section, the American Epilepsy Society and the Spina Bifida Association of America. Dr. Blount served as delegate and Secretary of the Accreditation Council of Pediatric Neurosurgery Fellowships and as the Chair of the Professional Advisory Board of the Spina Bifida Association of America.

Dr. Blount was elected to the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics in 2017.

 

Jay Riva-Cambrin, MD

Dr. Riva-Cambrin graduated from medical school in June 1998 and then completed a neurosurgery residency at the University of Toronto, Canada. He obtained a Masters of Science in Clinical Epidemiology from the University of Toronto under the direction of Dr. James Drake. Dr. Riva-Cambrin completed a postgraduate fellowship in pediatric neurological surgery at The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto.

Dr. Riva-Cambrin's clinical interest is pediatric neurosurgery specifically including the treatment of hydrocephalus, craniofacial surgery, endoscopy, and clinical epidemiology. He is the Scientific Director of the Canadian Pediatric Neurosurgery Study Group (CPNSG). He is also a Principal Investigator within the Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network (HCRN). Recent research interests include comparing the outcomes between ETV+CPC and shunts in the infant hydrocephalus population, predicting success in ETV+CPC–treated infants, and exploring the relationship between ventricle size and neuropsychological outcomes in older children treated for hydrocephalus. He has been a principal investigator or co-investigator on 14 grants and has over 87 peer-reviewed publications, mostly focused on pediatric hydrocephalus.

Dr. Riva-Cambrin has recently joined the faculty at the University of Calgary from his previous role at the University of Utah. He is an Associate Professor of Neurosurgery, the Residency Program Director for the neurosurgery training program, and is the Founder and Director of ACORN Kids (www.acornkids.org) a neurosurgical clinical research center at the University of Calgary with special focus on pediatric hydrocephalus and craniofacial surgery.

Dr. Riva-Cambrin was elected to the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics in 2018.

 

Sandi Lam, MD, MBA

Sandi Lam, MD, MBA, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery, Section of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston, Texas. She is a faculty affiliate at the Baylor Center for Ethics and Policy as well as a faculty advisor for the Texas Medical Center Innovation Institute. She completed her neurosurgery residency at University of California, Los Angeles, and Pediatric Neurosurgery fellowship at University of Pittsburgh/Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh.

Her clinical focus encompasses pediatric epilepsy surgery, cerebrovascular surgery, and craniofacial surgery. Her interests and expertise include minimally invasive endoscopic surgical techniques, quality improvement/process improvement, patient engagement, and development of multidisciplinary patient-centered clinical programs. Her academic program is based on health services research with quality improvement and outcomes research using data analytics to understand and improve health care utilization and delivery. This focus intersects with policy and advocacy.

Her clinical and academic interests are reflected in over 120 peer-reviewed publications, as well as multiple textbook chapters and invited lectures. She was the American College of Surgeons/American Association of Neurological Surgeons Health Policy scholar for 2015-2016, and continues to participate in leadership, advocacy, and quality work in regional and national forums. Dr. Lam actively engages in education, mentorship, and career development for neurosurgery trainees, young faculty, graduate students, and health tech innovators. She also contributes to international neurosurgery efforts toward building sustainable pediatric neurosurgery services in developing countries.

Dr. Lam was elected to the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics in 2018.

 

Elizabeth Tyler-Kabara, MD, PhD

Dr. Elizabeth C. Tyler-Kabara, MD, PhD completed her bachelor’s degree at Duke University, double majoring in biomedical and electrical engineering, in 1989. After leaving Duke, she worked at the National Institutes of Health as a biomedical engineer, developing and testing molecular biology software, developing a strategic plan for implementing computer networking.

She left the NIH to attend Vanderbilt University, earning her MD and PhD in 1997. She completed her internship in general surgery at the University of Pittsburgh in 1998 under the direction of Richard Simmons, MD. Following internship she specialized in neurological surgery during her residency at UPMC and VA hospitals from 1998-2004 under L. Dade Lunsford, MD. She then completed a fellowship in pediatric neurosurgery at the Children’s Hospital of Alabama in 2005 under the direction of W. Jerry Oakes, MD.

Dr. Tyler-Kabara served as assistant professor in the Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, from 2005-2014 and is now associate professor. She has secondary appointments in the Department of Bioengineering, Swanson School of Engineering and in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Dr. Tyler-Kabara has been a faculty member of the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine since 2000, she has been a member of the medical staff of Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, UPMC Shadyside and UPMC Presbyterian since 2005 and a medical consultant at Magee Women’s Hospital of UPMC since 2007.

Dr. Tyler-Kabara directs the Neural Enhancement Laboratory in the Department of Neurological Surgery. The focus of the laboratory is improving function following injury to the central nervous system. Dr. Tyler-Kabara’s research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health, NINDS and NICHD, DARPA, Craig Nielsen and Margot Anderson Foundations, The Copeland Fund and Pedal with Pete. She served as principal investigator for five of those grants. She was the co-principal investigator on the grant that kick-started the brain computer interface human trials at the University of Pittsburgh.

She has served as a co-investigator on nine grants including the current brain computer interface grants. Current efforts are focused on the use of brain computer interfaces to restore function. The current studies employ electrocorticography and microelectrode techniques in conjunction with brain computer interfaces for control of neural prosthetics. These studies are conducted in collaboration with the Human Rehabilitation Neural Engineering Laboratory in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation combining expertise in engineering, neuroscience, and rehabilitation medicine. Additionally, Dr. Tyler-Kabara has been the director of the Spasticity and Movement Disorder Program at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh since 2006. This program is one of the few multidiscipline movement disorder programs combining the expertise of neurological surgery, orthopedics, physiatry, neurology, occupational and physical therapy and social work.

Dr. Tyler-Kabara was the director of the Surgical Epilepsy Program at the University of Pittsburgh. She provided the support to build both the pediatric and adult epilepsy programs including recruiting new faculty members for each program. She served on the Epilepsy Task Force created in 2012. She has served on the executive committee for the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine since 2008. She is currently a member of the Medical Executive Committee at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh.

In her clinical work she has pioneered the use of expanded endonasal surgery of the skull base in extremely young children providing them with a minimally invasive alternative for the treatment of a variety of conditions.

Dr. Tyler-Kabara was elected to the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics in 2018.