Radial to axillary nerve transfer

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  • 1 Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital General Universitario de Valencia, Spain; and
  • 2 Medical School, University College London, United Kingdom
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Axillary nerve injury is common after brachial plexus injuries, particularly with shoulder luxation. Nerve grafting is the traditional procedure for postganglionic injuries. Nerve transfer is emerging as a viable option particularly in late referrals. At the proximal arm the radial and axillary nerves lie close by. Sacrificing one of the triceps muscle nerve branches induces little negative consequences. Transferring the long head of the triceps nerve branch is a good option to recover axillary nerve function. The surgical technique is presented in a video, stressing the steps to achieve a successful result.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/WbVbpMuPxIE.

Axillary nerve injury is common after brachial plexus injuries, particularly with shoulder luxation. Nerve grafting is the traditional procedure for postganglionic injuries. Nerve transfer is emerging as a viable option particularly in late referrals. At the proximal arm the radial and axillary nerves lie close by. Sacrificing one of the triceps muscle nerve branches induces little negative consequences. Transferring the long head of the triceps nerve branch is a good option to recover axillary nerve function. The surgical technique is presented in a video, stressing the steps to achieve a successful result.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/WbVbpMuPxIE.

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Contributor Notes

CORRESPONDENCE Vicente Vanaclocha: Hospital General Universitario de Valencia, Spain. vvanaclo@hotmail.com.

INCLUDE WHEN CITING Published online January 1, 2018; DOI: http://thejns.org/doi/abs/10.3171/2018.1.FocusVid.17404.

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