History of surgery for cerebrovascular disease in children. Part II. Vein of Galen malformations

Jeffrey P. Blount M.D., W. Jerry Oakes M.D., R. Shane Tubbs P.A.-C., Ph.D., and Robin P. Humphreys M.D.
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  • Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham/Children's Hospital of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama; and the Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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✓ Vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations are a mixed group of lesions characterized by an abnormal fistula between abnormal distal branches of the choroidal and/or posterior cerebral arteries and the great vein of Galen. In this paper the authors trace the historical evolution of the current approach to diagnosis and treatment, and the literature is reviewed comprehensively. During the historical era, vein of Galen malformations were described in individual case reports and an early classification system was developed. In the early era of treatment, open surgery was the preferred approach, although morbidity and mortality rates were high. The development of neurointerventional techniques allowed the introduction of occlusive materials into the fistula, with pronounced improvements in clinical outcome.

Abbreviations used in this paper:AVM = arteriovenous malformation; CA = carotid artery.

✓ Vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations are a mixed group of lesions characterized by an abnormal fistula between abnormal distal branches of the choroidal and/or posterior cerebral arteries and the great vein of Galen. In this paper the authors trace the historical evolution of the current approach to diagnosis and treatment, and the literature is reviewed comprehensively. During the historical era, vein of Galen malformations were described in individual case reports and an early classification system was developed. In the early era of treatment, open surgery was the preferred approach, although morbidity and mortality rates were high. The development of neurointerventional techniques allowed the introduction of occlusive materials into the fistula, with pronounced improvements in clinical outcome.

Abbreviations used in this paper:AVM = arteriovenous malformation; CA = carotid artery.

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Contributor Notes

Address reprint requests to: Jeffrey P. Blount, M.D., Pediatric Neurosurgery, Children's Hospital of Alabama, ACC 400, 1600 Seventh Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35233. email: jeffrey.blount@ccc.uab.edu.

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