Contralateral transcallosal resection of a ventricular body arteriovenous malformation: 3D operative video

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  • 1 Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, California
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A 46-year-old male presented with an incidentally discovered left ventricular body arteriovenous malformation (AVM). It measured 2 cm in diameter and had drainage via an atrial vein into the internal cerebral vein (Spetzler-Martin Grade III, Supplementary Grade 4). Preoperative embolization of the posterior medial choroidal artery reduced nidus size by 50%. Subsequently, he underwent a right-sided craniotomy for a contralateral transcallosal approach to resect the AVM. This case demonstrates strategic circumferential disconnection of feeding arteries (FAs) to the nidus, the use of aneurysm clips to control large FAs, and the use of dynamic retraction and importance of a generous callosotomy. Postoperatively, he was neurologically intact, and angiogram confirmed complete resection.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/j0778LfS3MI.

A 46-year-old male presented with an incidentally discovered left ventricular body arteriovenous malformation (AVM). It measured 2 cm in diameter and had drainage via an atrial vein into the internal cerebral vein (Spetzler-Martin Grade III, Supplementary Grade 4). Preoperative embolization of the posterior medial choroidal artery reduced nidus size by 50%. Subsequently, he underwent a right-sided craniotomy for a contralateral transcallosal approach to resect the AVM. This case demonstrates strategic circumferential disconnection of feeding arteries (FAs) to the nidus, the use of aneurysm clips to control large FAs, and the use of dynamic retraction and importance of a generous callosotomy. Postoperatively, he was neurologically intact, and angiogram confirmed complete resection.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/j0778LfS3MI.

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Contributor Notes

CORRESPONDENCE Michael T. Lawton, University of California, San Francisco, Department of Neurological Surgery, 505 Parnassus Ave., Rm. M779, San Francisco, CA 94143-0112. email: Michael.Lawton@ucsf.edu.

INCLUDE WHEN CITING Published online July 1, 2017; DOI: http://thejns.org/doi/abs/10.3171/2017.7.FocusVid.17143.

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