Mechanisms of tumor-related brain edema

Full access

✓Cerebral edema contributes strongly to symptoms associated with brain tumors. Although the introduction of corticosteroids has greatly simplified treatment of patients with newly diagnosed tumors, these drugs are associated with marked side effects during the long-term treatment that is often necessary in the recurrences. Therefore, a better understanding of mechanisms related to the evolution and clearance of tumor-related edema with the aid of modern imaging and molecular methodology is clearly necessary. Recently, researchers have focused on molecular mechanisms of edema development and have demonstrated alternative routes—such as the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitors—to be explored for treating edema. In this review the author focuses on established and current concepts regarding the pathophysiology of cerebral edema and its treatment.

Abbreviations used in this paper:BBB = blood–brain barrier; COX-2 = cyclooxygenase-2; CT = computed tomography; DT = diffusion tensor; GBM = glioblastoma multiforme; MR = magnetic resonance; NO = nitric oxide; NOS = NO synthase; VEGF = vascular endothelial growth factor; VEGFR = VEGF receptor; WHO = World Health Organization..

✓Cerebral edema contributes strongly to symptoms associated with brain tumors. Although the introduction of corticosteroids has greatly simplified treatment of patients with newly diagnosed tumors, these drugs are associated with marked side effects during the long-term treatment that is often necessary in the recurrences. Therefore, a better understanding of mechanisms related to the evolution and clearance of tumor-related edema with the aid of modern imaging and molecular methodology is clearly necessary. Recently, researchers have focused on molecular mechanisms of edema development and have demonstrated alternative routes—such as the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitors—to be explored for treating edema. In this review the author focuses on established and current concepts regarding the pathophysiology of cerebral edema and its treatment.

If the inline PDF is not rendering correctly, you can download the PDF file here.

Article Information

Address reprint requests to: Walter Stummer, M.D., Department of Neurosurgery, University of Düsseldorf, Moorenstrasse 5, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany. email: stummer@uni-duesseldorf.de.

© AANS, except where prohibited by US copyright law.

Cited By

Metrics

Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 1 1 0
Full Text Views 652 652 45
PDF Downloads 627 627 31
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0

PubMed

Google Scholar