Choroid plexus cyst and chordoid glioma

Report of two cases

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Several types of mass lesions may occur in the third and lateral ventricles. Typically they arise from the lining of the ventricular cavity or from contiguous structures, by extension into the ventricle. The authors describe two patients, each of whom presented with a different rare lesion of the ventricular system. The first was a 53-year-old woman with a history of hypertension who sustained a blunt traumatic injury to the occipital region and subsequently developed a progressively worsening right-sided headache. Radiological examinations over the next 2 years revealed an enlarged right lateral ventricle and, ultimately, a choroid plexus cyst in its anterior and middle third, near the foramen of Monro, which is a rare location for these lesions. The cyst was removed en bloc, and follow-up examinations showed a significant improvement in her headache and a minimal differences in size between right and left ventricles. The authors also describe a 57-year-old man with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and an old mycardial infarct, who presented to an outside institution with a progressively worsening headache, generalized malaise, and loss of olfactory sensation. Diagnostic imaging revealed a 1.5-cm oval lesion centered in the lamina terminalis region, an open craniotomy was performed, and evaluation of a biopsy sample demonstrated the mass to be a chordoid glioma of the third ventricle, a recently described glioma subtype. Two days after surgery, he suffered a left parietal stroke and an anterior mycardial infarction. After convalescing, he presented to The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center for radiotherapy and follow up; 7 months later he was readmitted complaining of headache, short-term memory loss, and worsening confusion and disorientation. Neuroimaging revealed progression of the tumor (now 2 cm in diameter), which was removed by gross-total resection. His headache resolved immediately, and 2 months later his only complaint was of episodes of confusion. Three weeks later he died of a massive myocardial infarction. These two patients represent the sixth case of an adult with a choroid plexus cyst in the anterior lateral ventricle and the 19th case of an adult with a chordoid glioma of the third ventricle, respectively.

Abbreviations used in this paper:CSF = cerebrospinal fluid; CT = computerized tomography; MR = magnetic resonance.

Several types of mass lesions may occur in the third and lateral ventricles. Typically they arise from the lining of the ventricular cavity or from contiguous structures, by extension into the ventricle. The authors describe two patients, each of whom presented with a different rare lesion of the ventricular system. The first was a 53-year-old woman with a history of hypertension who sustained a blunt traumatic injury to the occipital region and subsequently developed a progressively worsening right-sided headache. Radiological examinations over the next 2 years revealed an enlarged right lateral ventricle and, ultimately, a choroid plexus cyst in its anterior and middle third, near the foramen of Monro, which is a rare location for these lesions. The cyst was removed en bloc, and follow-up examinations showed a significant improvement in her headache and a minimal differences in size between right and left ventricles. The authors also describe a 57-year-old man with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and an old mycardial infarct, who presented to an outside institution with a progressively worsening headache, generalized malaise, and loss of olfactory sensation. Diagnostic imaging revealed a 1.5-cm oval lesion centered in the lamina terminalis region, an open craniotomy was performed, and evaluation of a biopsy sample demonstrated the mass to be a chordoid glioma of the third ventricle, a recently described glioma subtype. Two days after surgery, he suffered a left parietal stroke and an anterior mycardial infarction. After convalescing, he presented to The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center for radiotherapy and follow up; 7 months later he was readmitted complaining of headache, short-term memory loss, and worsening confusion and disorientation. Neuroimaging revealed progression of the tumor (now 2 cm in diameter), which was removed by gross-total resection. His headache resolved immediately, and 2 months later his only complaint was of episodes of confusion. Three weeks later he died of a massive myocardial infarction. These two patients represent the sixth case of an adult with a choroid plexus cyst in the anterior lateral ventricle and the 19th case of an adult with a chordoid glioma of the third ventricle, respectively.

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Article Information

Address reprint requests to: Raymond Sawaya, M.D., Department of Neurosurgery–442, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030. email: rsawaya@mdanderson.org.

© AANS, except where prohibited by US copyright law.

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