Top 25 Cited Gamma Knife® Surgery Articles—Meningioma

December 2017, Volume 127

Top 25 Cited Gamma Knife® Surgery Articles—Meningioma

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Seong-Hyun Park, Hideyuki Kano, Ajay Niranjan, John C. Flickinger and L. Dade Lunsford

Object

To assess the long-term outcomes of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for cerebellopontine angle (CPA) meningiomas, the authors retrospectively reviewed data from a 20-year experience. They evaluated progression-free survival as well as improvement, stabilization, or deterioration in clinical symptoms.

Methods

Seventy-four patients with CPA meningiomas underwent SRS involving various Gamma Knife technologies between 1990 and 2010. The most common presenting symptoms were dizziness or disequilibrium, hearing loss, facial sensory dysfunction, and headache. The median tumor volume was 3.0 cm3 (range 0.3–17.1 cm3), and the median radiation dose to the tumor margin was 13 Gy (range 11–16 Gy). The median follow-up period was 40 months (range 4–147 months).

Results

At last imaging follow-up, the tumor volume had decreased in 46 patients (62%), remained stable in 26 patients (35%), and increased in 2 patients (3%). The progression-free survival after SRS was 98% at 1 year, 98% at 3 years, and 95% at 5 years. At the last clinical follow-up, 23 patients (31%) showed neurological improvement, 43 patients (58%) showed no change in symptoms or signs, and 8 patients (11%) had worsening symptoms or signs. The neurological improvement rate after SRS was 16% at 1 year, 31% at 3 years, and 40% at 5 years. The post-SRS deterioration rate was 5% at 1 year, 10% at 3 years, and 16% at 5 years. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that trigeminal neuralgia was the symptom most likely to worsen after SRS (HR 0.08, 95% CI 0.02–0.31; p = 0.001). Asymptomatic peritumoral edema occurred in 4 patients (5%) after SRS, and symptomatic adverse radiation effects developed in 7 patients (9%).

Conclusions

Stereotactic radiosurgery for CPA meningiomas provided a high tumor control rate and relatively low risk of ARE. Tumor compression of the trigeminal nerve by a CPA meningioma resulted in an increased rate of facial pain worsening in this patient experience.

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Georgios Zenonos, Douglas Kondziolka, John C. Flickinger, Paul Gardner and L. Dade Lunsford

Object

Microsurgical management of foramen magnum meningiomas (FMMs) can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Stereotactic radiosurgery may be an efficient and safe alternative treatment modality for such tumors. The object of this study was to increase the documented experience with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for FMMs and to delineate its role in an overall management paradigm.

Methods

The authors report on their experience with 24 patients harboring FMMs managed with GKS. Twelve patients had primary symptomatic tumors, 5 had asymptomatic but enlarging primary tumors, and 7 had recurrent or residual tumors after a prior surgery.

Results

Follow-up clinical and imaging data were available in 21 patients at a median follow-up of 47 months (range 3–128 months). Ten patients had measurable tumor regression, which was defined as an overall volume reduction > 25%. Eleven patients had no further tumor growth. Two patients died as a result of advanced comorbidities before follow-up imaging. One patient was living 8 years after GKS but had no clinical evaluation. Ten of 17 symptomatic patients with at least 6 months of follow-up had symptom improvement, and 7 remained clinically stable. Smaller tumors were more likely to regress. No patient suffered an adverse radiation effect after radiosurgery.

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery was a safe management strategy for small, minimally symptomatic, or growing FMMs as well as for residual tumors following conservative microsurgical removal.

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Thomas J. Flannery, Hideyuki Kano, L. Dade Lunsford, Sait Sirin, Matthew Tormenti, Ajay Niranjan, John C. Flickinger and Douglas Kondziolka

Object

Because of their critical location adjacent to brain, cranial nerve, and vascular structures, petroclival meningiomas remain a clinical challenge. The authors evaluated outcomes in 168 patients with petroclival meningiomas who underwent Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) during a 21-year interval.

Methods

Gamma Knife surgery was used as either primary or adjuvant treatment of 168 petroclival meningiomas involving the region between the petrous apex and the upper two-thirds of the clivus. The most common presenting symptoms were trigeminal nerve dysfunction, balance problems, diplopia, and hearing loss. The median tumor volume was 6.1 cm3 (range 0.3–32.5 cm3), and the median radiation dose to the tumor margin was 13 Gy (range 9–18 Gy).

Results

During a median follow-up of 72 months, neurological status improved in 44 patients (26%), remained stable in 98 (58%), and worsened in 26 (15%). Tumor volume decreased in 78 patients (46%), remained stable in 74 (44%), and increased in 16 (10%), all of whom were subjected to additional management strategies. Overall 5- and 10-year progression-free survival rates were 91 and 86%, respectively. Patients followed up for at least 10 years (31 patients) had tumor and symptom control rates of 97 and 94%, respectively. Eight patients had repeat radiosurgery, 4 underwent delayed resection, and 4 had fractionated radiation therapy. Cerebrospinal fluid diversion was performed in 7 patients (4%). Significant risk factors for tumor progression were a tumor volume ≥ 8 cm3 (p = 0.001) and male sex (p = 0.02).

Conclusions

In this 21-year experience, GKS for petroclival meningiomas obviated initial or further resection in 98% of patients and was associated with a low risk of adverse radiation effects. The authors believe that radiosurgery should be considered as an initial option for patients with smaller-volume, symptomatic petroclival meningiomas.

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Douglas Kondziolka, Ricky Madhok, L. Dade Lunsford, David Mathieu, Juan J. Martin, Ajay Niranjan and John C. Flickinger

Object

Meningiomas of the cerebral convexity are often surgically curable because both the mass and involved dura mater can be removed. Stereotactic radiosurgery has become an important primary or adjuvant treatment for patients with intracranial meningiomas. The authors evaluated clinical and imaging outcomes in patients with convexity meningiomas after radiosurgery.

Methods

The patient cohort consisted of 125 patients with convexity meningiomas managed using radiosurgery at some point during an 18-year period. The patient series included 76 women, 55 patients who had undergone prior resection, and 6 patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2. Tumors were located in frontal (80 patients), parietal (24 patients), temporal (12 patients), and occipital (9 patients) areas. The WHO tumor grades in patients with prior resections were Grade I in 34 patients, Grade II in 15 patients, and Grade III in 6 patients. Seventy patients underwent primary radiosurgery and therefore had no prior histological tumor diagnosis. The mean tumor volume was 7.6 ml. Radiosurgery was performed using the Leksell Gamma Knife with a mean tumor margin dose of 14.2 Gy.

Results

Serial imaging was evaluated in 115 patients (92%). After primary radiosurgery, the tumor control rate was 92%. After adjuvant radiosurgery, the control rate was 97% for Grade I tumors. The actuarial tumor control rates at 3 and 5 years for the entire series were 86.1 ± 3.8% and 71.6 ± 8.6%, respectively. For patients with benign tumors (Grade I) and those without prior surgery, the actuarial tumor control rate was 95.3 ± 2.3% and 85.8 ± 9.3%, respectively. Delayed resection after radiosurgery was performed in 9 patients (7%) at an average of 35 months. No patient developed a subsequent radiation-induced tumor. The overall morbidity rate was 9.6%. Symptomatic peritumoral imaging changes compatible with edema or adverse radiation effects developed in 5%, at a mean of 8 months.

Conclusions

Stereotactic radiosurgery provides satisfactory control rates either after resection or as an alternate to resection, particularly for histologically benign meningiomas. Its role is most valuable for patients whose tumors affect critical neurological regions and who are poor candidates for resection. Both temporary and permanent morbidity are related to brain location and tumor volume.