Journal of Neurosurgery: Case Lessons
Volume 7 (2024): Issue 15 (Apr 2024)
Open access

BACKGROUND

In microvascular decompression (MVD) for vein-related trigeminal neuralgia (TN), determining whether transection of the offending vein is safe can be challenging. Here, the authors present a case of vein-related TN successfully treated by sacrificing the offending vein on the basis of findings from indocyanine green (ICG) video angiography and a temporary venous occlusion test to assess the collateral flow of the offending vessel.

OBSERVATIONS

A 43-year-old man presented with TN, which had failed to respond to previous medical therapy. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that the transverse or superior petrosal vein was the offending vein. The patient underwent MVD. Because the transposition of the offending vein was anatomically challenging, a temporary vein occlusion test was performed using ICG video angiography. During and after temporary occlusion, bidirectional flow in the offending vein was observed, suggesting collateral flow even after vein occlusion. On the basis of these findings, the offending vein was transected, resulting in relief from pain without any complications. Postoperative MRI revealed no new lesions in the brainstem or the cerebellar hemisphere. The patient has been free from neuralgia for 6 months.

LESSONS

The temporary vein occlusion test under ICG video angiography was useful for evaluating collateral flow in the offending vein in TN.

Open access

BACKGROUND

Intradural spinal tumors are an uncommon entity with a variety of pathologies and symptom patterns. Few cases reports in the literature have described tumor migration within the spinal canal.

OBSERVATIONS

A 38-year-old male presented with bilateral upper lumbar radicular symptoms of anterior thigh pain, with an enhancing tumor of the cauda equina initially located at L1–2. He declined surgery initially, and at a follow-up 3 years later, his symptoms were unchanged but the tumor was now located at T12–L1. He again declined surgery, but 3 months later, he had a significant change in his pain distribution, which was now along his posterolateral right leg to his foot with associated dorsiflexion and extensor hallicus longus weakness. At this time, the tumor had migrated to L2–3. He underwent laminectomy and tumor resection with resolution of his radicular symptoms and improvement in his strength back to baseline by the 1-month follow-up. Pathology was consistent with a World Health Organization grade I schwannoma.

LESSONS

Migratory schwannoma is a rare entity but should be considered when radicular symptoms acutely change in the setting of a known intradural tumor. Repeat imaging should be performed to avoid wrong-level surgery. Intraoperative imaging can also be used for tumor localization.

Open access

BACKGROUND

Neurocysticercosis is a parasitic infection of the central nervous system. Cysts located in the ventricles, intraventricular neurocysticercosis (IVNCC), can cause symptoms of increased intracranial pressure and, if untreated, can be fatal. Neuroendoscopic removal of IVNCC is recommended as the first-line treatment.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors present the case of a healthy 30-year-old male originally from Mexico who presented with headaches and vomiting. He was found to have a cyst in the third ventricle on imaging, consistent with IVNCC. The authors successfully performed neuroendoscopic surgery with removal of the cyst en bloc.

LESSONS

A multidisciplinary team of neurosurgery and infectious disease specialists is recommended for successful management of patients with IVNCC. These patients typically require neuroendoscopic surgical removal for definitive treatment. In this case, the authors show surgery resulted in an effective cure without the need for antiparasitic medication and excellent long-term outcomes.

Open access

BACKGROUND

Robot-assisted sacroiliac joint (SIJ) fusion has gained popularity, but it carries the risk of complications such as injury to the superior gluteal artery (SGA). The authors present the case of an awake percutaneous robot-assisted SIJ fusion leading to an SGA pseudoaneurysm.

OBSERVATIONS

An 80-year-old male, who had undergone an awake percutaneous robot-assisted SIJ fusion, experienced postoperative left hip pain and bruising. Subsequent arteriography demonstrated an SGA branch pseudoaneurysm requiring coil embolization.

LESSONS

An SGA injury, although uncommon (1.2% incidence), can arise from percutaneous screw placement, aberrant anatomy, or hardware contact. Thorough preoperative imaging, precise robot-assisted screw insertion, and soft tissue protection are crucial to mitigate risks. Immediate angiography aids in prompt diagnosis and effective intervention. Comprehensive knowledge of anatomical variants is essential for managing complications and optimizing preventative measures in robot-assisted SIJ fusion.

Open access

BACKGROUND

The best surgical approach for resecting bilateral parafalcine meningioma, as well as the optimal anesthesia and airway management for craniotomy in patients with interstitial pneumonia (IP) for preventing postsurgical exacerbation, remains unclear.

OBSERVATIONS

A 66-year-old female with a history of multiple relapses of IP underwent craniotomy for resection of a 4.5-cm bilateral parafalcine meningioma located just beneath the inferior sagittal sinus. To avoid mechanical ventilation or high-concentration oxygenation, the entire procedure was performed under nonintubated spontaneous breathing conditions with a supraglottic airway/laryngeal mask airway (SGA/LMA) device. Half of the tumor was resected using the ipsilateral interhemispheric approach, while the remaining half was resected using the contralateral transfalcine approach (CTA). No brain retractors were required. Preoperative embolization contributed toward reducing blood loss and surgery duration. During most of the operation, additional oxygen administration was not required. The postoperative course was uneventful, without exacerbation of the IP.

LESSONS

This case demonstrated the utility and feasibility of a unilateral interhemispheric approach combined with CTA for resection of a bilateral parafalcine meningioma. Additionally, this case provides an alternative method of airway and anesthesia management with an SGA/LMA device and nonintubated spontaneous breathing for the prevention of postoperative acute exacerbation of IP.

Open access

BACKGROUND

von Hippel-Lindau disease–associated hemangioblastomas (HBs) account for 20%–30% of all HB cases, with the appearance of new lesions often observed in the natural course of the disease. By comparison, the development of new lesions is rare in patients with sporadic HB.

OBSERVATIONS

A 65-year-old man underwent clipping for an unruptured aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery. Fourteen years later, follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a strongly enhanced mass in the right cerebellar hemisphere, diagnosed as a sporadic HB. A retrospective review of MRI studies obtained over the follow-up period revealed the gradual development of peritumoral edema and vascularization before mass formation.

LESSONS

Newly appearing high-intensity T2 lesions in the cerebellum may represent a preliminary stage of tumorigenesis. Careful monitoring of these patients would be indicated, which could provide options for early treatment to improve patient outcomes.

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