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Open access

Early cerebral venous drainage associated with focal seizures: a correlation of digital subtraction angiography and electroencephalography. Illustrative case

Olivia Holman, Joseph M Bibawy, Lara Wadi, Joel C Morgenlander, and Erik F Hauck

BACKGROUND

Early venous drainage is a critical diagnostic feature of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs). However, other conditions associated with early venous drainage can mimic AVMs and AVFs and mislead the treating physician team.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors present a unique case of a 56-year-old man with new left hemianopsia. Workup with magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography had revealed cortical enhancement and early venous drainage, possibly caused by an AVF or AVM. Catheter angiography confirmed the presence of early venous drainage of specifically the right occipital lobe. The early venous drainage occurred as the result of local hyperperfusion limited to the right occipital lobe. Subsequent electroencephalography confirmed focal seizure activity in the right occipital lobe. After seizure control with multiple antiepileptic medications, the patient regained his vision. Repeat digital subtraction angiography revealed restoration of normal cerebral blood flow.

LESSONS

Early venous drainage observed during catheter angiography can be associated with seizure activity. Differentiation from other conditions, such as AVM, AVF, or ischemic stroke, is critical to facilitate prompt and appropriate treatment.

Open access

Bilateral and asymmetrical localization of language function identified by the superselective infusion of propofol in an epilepsy patient with a mild malformation of cortical development: illustrative case

Mayuko Otomo, Shin-ichiro Osawa, Kyoko Suzuki, Kazuo Kakinuma, Kazushi Ukishiro, Hiroyoshi Suzuki, Kuniyasu Niizuma, Norio Narita, Nobukazu Nakasato, and Teiji Tominaga

BACKGROUND

Atypical localization of language function can result in unexpected postsurgical deficits after cortical resection, but it is difficult to predict the risk in the presurgical evaluation. The authors experienced a rare case of the bilateral and independent existence of different components of language function identified by segmented evaluation of anatomical anterior and posterior language areas using the superselective infusion of propofol.

OBSERVATIONS

A 32-year-old right-handed female presented with drug-resistant epilepsy. Comprehensive epilepsy evaluation suggested that the epileptic foci involved the whole left frontal lobe but provided less evidence of structural abnormality. To estimate the extent of functional deterioration likely to be caused by an extended left frontal lobectomy, the authors evaluated segmented cortical function in the ipsi- and contralateral hemispheres by the superselective infusion of propofol into the branches of the intracranial artery. The results revealed bilateral and asymmetrical localization of language function because the patient presented with different components of aphasia in each hemisphere. Based on the authors’ assessment of her functional tolerance, an extended left frontal lobectomy was performed and resulted in neurological deficits within the anticipated range.

LESSONS

An accurate understanding of the correlations between vascular and functional anatomy and the highly specific evaluation of language function provides more advanced presurgical assessment, allowing more tailored planning of cortical resection.

Open access

Radiofrequency ablation during stereoelectroencephalography: from diagnostic tool to therapeutic intervention. Illustrative case

Demitre Serletis, Juan Bulacio, Justin Bingaman, Elham Abushanab, Stephen P. Harasimchuk, Richard Rammo, Silvia Neme-Mercante, and William Bingaman

BACKGROUND

Radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RFTC) during intracranial stereoelectroencephalography (sEEG) was first described as a safe technique for creating lesions of epileptic foci in 2004. Since that time, the method has been applied as a diagnostic and/or palliative intervention. Although widely practiced in European epilepsy surgical programs, the technique has not been popularized in the United States given the lack of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved technologies permitting safe usage of in situ sEEG electrodes for this purpose.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors present a case report of a young female patient with refractory left neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy undergoing sEEG electrode implantation, who underwent sEEG-guided RFTC via a stereotactic temperature-sensing pallidotomy probe. Although used as a diagnostic step in her workup, the patient has remained seizure-free for nearly 18 months.

LESSONS

The use of in situ sEEG electrodes for RFTC remains limited in the United States. In this context, this case highlights a safe alternative and temporizing approach to performing diagnostic sEEG-guided RFTC, using a temperature-sensing pallidotomy probe to create small, precise stereotactic lesions. The authors caution careful consideration of this technique as a temporary work-around solution while also highlighting the rising need for new FDA-approved technologies for safe RFTC through in situ temperature-sensing sEEG electrodes.

Open access

An epileptogenic intracranial cystic lesion lined with fallopian tube-type epithelium: illustrative case

Yuji Dekita, Yushin Takemoto, Kazutaka Ozono, Tadashi Hamasaki, Rin Yamada, Yoshiki Mikami, Jun-ichiro Kuroda, Nobuyuki Tsubota, and Akitake Mukasa

BACKGROUND

Intracranial cystic lesions are often a trigger for epileptic seizures. However, there has never been a report of a cystic lesion lined with fallopian tube-type epithelium.

OBSERVATIONS

A 48-year-old female presented with a cystic lesion in the right occipital lobe, which gradually grew over 8 years. Right occipital lobe epilepsy was diagnosed based on visual aura, convulsive seizures, and electroencephalogram findings and the cyst was surgically removed. Further examination revealed the cyst was lined with ciliated cells, which had morphological and immunohistochemical features similar to those of fallopian tube epithelium.

LESSONS

The characteristics of the cyst did not conform to any known types of benign cystic lesion. To the authors’ knowledge, no such cyst has been reported before. The authors discuss the origins and pathogenesis of this unfamiliar cystic lesion.

Open access

Seizure freedom after laser amygdalohippocampotomy guided by bilateral responsive neurostimulation in pediatric epilepsy: illustrative case

Belinda Shao, Bryan Zheng, David D. Liu, Matthew N. Anderson, Konstantina Svokos, Luca Bartolini, and Wael F. Asaad

BACKGROUND

For patients with difficult-to-lateralize temporal lobe epilepsy, the use of chronic recordings as a diagnostic tool to inform subsequent surgical therapy is an emerging paradigm that has been reported in adults but not in children.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors reported the case of a 15-year-old girl with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy who was found to have bitemporal epilepsy during a stereoelectroencephalography (sEEG) admission. She underwent placement of a responsive neurostimulator system with bilateral hippocampal depth electrodes. However, over many months, her responsive neurostimulation (RNS) recordings revealed that her typical, chronic seizures were right-sided only. This finding led to a subsequent right-sided laser amygdalohippocampotomy, resulting in seizure freedom.

LESSONS

In this case, RNS chronic recording provided real-world data that enabled more precise seizure localization than inpatient sEEG data, informing surgical decision-making that led to seizure freedom. The use of RNS chronic recordings as a diagnostic adjunct to seizure localization procedures and laser ablation therapies in children is an area with potential for future study.