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Nasser Mohammed, Yi-Chieh Hung, Thomas J. Eluvathingal Muttikkal, Roy C. Bliley, Zhiyuan Xu and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

The motor root of the trigeminal nerve runs close to the sensory root and receives considerable radiation during Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The object of this study was to evaluate via MRI the changes in the muscles of mastication before and after upfront GKRS in patients with idiopathic TN.

METHODS

In this single-institution retrospective cohort study, all patients with idiopathic unilateral TN treated with primary GKRS at the University of Virginia in the period from 2007 to 2017 were included provided that they had pre- and post-GKRS MRI data. The thicknesses of the temporalis, pterygoid, and masseter muscles were measured on both pre- and post-GKRS MRI in a blinded fashion. Changes in the muscles like fatty infiltration, MRI signal, or atrophy were noted.

RESULTS

Among the 68 patients eligible for inclusion in the study, 136 temporalis muscles, 136 medial pterygoid muscles, 136 lateral pterygoid muscles, and 136 masseter muscles were assessed. A subset of patients was found to have muscle atrophy even prior to GKRS. Pre-GKRS atrophy of the masseter, medial pterygoid, lateral pterygoid, and temporalis muscles was seen in 18 (26%), 16 (24%), 9 (13%), and 16 (24%) patients, respectively. Logistic regression analysis showed that distribution of pain in the V3 territory (p = 0.01, OR 5.43, 95% CI 1.46–20.12) and significant pain on chewing (p = 0.02, OR 5.32, 95% CI 1.25–22.48) were predictive of pre-GKRS atrophy. Reversal of atrophy of these muscles occurred after GKRS in a majority of the patients. The incidence of new-onset permanent post-GKRS muscle atrophy was 1.5%. The median follow-up was 39 months (range 6–108 months).

CONCLUSIONS

A subset of patients with TN with significant pain on chewing have pre-GKRS disuse atrophy of the muscles of mastication. A reversal of the atrophy occurs in a majority of the patients following GKRS. New-onset motor neuropathy post-GKRS was rare.

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Ruth Prieto, José María Pascual and Laura Barrios

Charles H. Frazier (1870–1936), one of the pioneers of neurosurgery in the US, is known worldwide for devising surgical procedures to relieve trigeminal neuralgia and intractable pain. Less well-known are his substantial contributions to understanding and treating pituitary and parahypophyseal lesions. Along with Bernard Alpers, he defined Rathke’s cleft tumors as a different pathological entity from adenomas and hypophyseal stalk tumors (craniopharyngiomas [CPs]). The surgical challenge posed by CPs piqued Frazier’s interest in these lesions, although he never published a complete account of his CP series. An examination of the Charles Frazier papers at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia allowed the authors to identify 54 CPs that he had treated during his career. In the early 1910s, Frazier developed the subfrontal approach, which would become the primary surgical route to access these lesions, providing better control of the adjacent vital neurovascular structures than the transsphenoidal route hitherto used. Nevertheless, strong adhesions between CPs and the third ventricle floor, the major reason underlying Frazier’s disappointing results, moved him to advocate incomplete tumor removal followed by radiotherapy to reduce both the risk of hypothalamic injury and CP recurrence. This conservative strategy remains a judicious treatment for CPs to this day.

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Kei Ando, Kazuyoshi Kobayashi, Masaaki Machino, Kyotaro Ota, Satoshi Tanaka, Masayoshi Morozumi, Sadayuki Ito, Shunsuke Kanbara, Taro Inoue, Naoki Ishiguro and Shiro Imagama

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between morphological changes in thoracic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (T-OPLL) and postoperative neurological recovery after thoracic posterior fusion surgery. Changes of OPLL morphology and postoperative recovery in cases with T-OPLL have not been examined.

METHODS

In this prospective study, the authors evaluated data from 44 patients (23 male and 21 female) who underwent posterior decompression and fusion surgery with instrumentation for the treatment of T-OPLL at our hospital. The patients’ mean age at surgery was 50.7 years (range 38–68 years). The minimum duration of follow-up was 2 years. The location of thoracic ossification of the ligamentum flavum (T-OLF), T-OLF at the OPLL level, OPLL morphology, fusion range, estimated blood loss, operative time, pre- and postoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores, and JOA recovery rate were investigated. Reconstructed sagittal multislice CT images were obtained before and at 3 and 6 months and 1 and 2 years after surgery. The basic fusion area was 3 vertebrae above and below the OPLL lesion. All parameters were compared between patients with and without continuity across the disc space at the OPLL at 3 and 6 months after surgery.

RESULTS

The preoperative morphology of OPLL was discontinuous across the disc space between the rostral and caudal ossification regions on sagittal CT images in all but one of the patients. Postoperatively, these segments became continuous in 42 patients (97.7%; occurring by 6.6 months on average) without progression of OPLL thickness. Patients with continuity at 3 months had significantly lower rates of diabetes mellitus (p < 0.05) and motor palsy in the lower extremities (p < 0.01). The group with continuity also had significantly higher mean postoperative JOA scores at 3 (p < 0.01) and 6 (p < 0.05) months and mean JOA recovery rates at 3 and 6 months (both p < 0.01) after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

Preoperatively, discontinuity of rostral and caudal ossified lesions was found on CT in all patients but one of this group of 44 patients who needed surgery for T-OPLL. Rigid fixation with instrumentation may have allowed these segments to connect at the OPLL. Such OPLL continuity at an early stage after surgery may accelerate spinal cord recovery.

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Carrie R. Muh, Naomi D. Chou, Shervin Rahimpour, Jordan M. Komisarow, Tracy G. Spears, Herbert E. Fuchs, Sandra Serafini and Gerald A. Grant

OBJECTIVE

To determine resection margins near eloquent tissue, electrical cortical stimulation (ECS) mapping is often used with visual naming tasks. In recent years, auditory naming tasks have been found to provide a more comprehensive map. Differences in modality-specific language sites have been found in adult patients, but there is a paucity of research on ECS language studies in pediatric patients. The goals of this study were to evaluate word-finding distinctions between visual and auditory modalities and identify which cortical subregions most often contain critical language function in a pediatric population.

METHODS

Twenty-one pediatric patients with epilepsy or temporal lobe pathology underwent ECS mapping using visual (n = 21) and auditory (n = 14) tasks. Fisher’s exact test was used to determine whether the frequency of errors in the stimulated trials was greater than the patient’s baseline error rate for each tested modality and subregion.

RESULTS

While the medial superior temporal gyrus was a common language site for both visual and auditory language (43.8% and 46.2% of patients, respectively), other subregions showed significant differences between modalities, and there was significant variability between patients. Visual language was more likely to be located in the anterior temporal lobe than was auditory language. The pediatric patients exhibited fewer parietal language sites and a larger range of sites overall than did adult patients in previously published studies.

CONCLUSIONS

There was no single area critical for language in more than 50% of patients tested in either modality for which more than 1 patient was tested (n > 1), affirming that language function is plastic in the setting of dominant-hemisphere pathology. The high rates of language function throughout the left frontal, temporal, and anterior parietal regions with few areas of overlap between modalities suggest that ECS mapping with both visual and auditory testing is necessary to obtain a comprehensive language map prior to epileptic focus or tumor resection.

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William Clifton

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Visish M. Srinivasan, Aditya Srivatsan, Alejandro M. Spiotta, Benjamin K. Hendricks, Andrew F. Ducruet, Felipe C. Albuquerque, Ajit Puri, Matthew R. Amans, Steven W. Hetts, Daniel L. Cooke, Christopher S. Ogilvy, Ajith J. Thomas, Alejandro Enriquez-Marulanda, Ansaar Rai, SoHyun Boo, Andrew P. Carlson, R. Webster Crowley, Leonardo Rangel-Castilla, Giuseppe Lanzino, Peng Roc Chen, Orlando Diaz, Bradley N. Bohnstedt, Kyle P. O’Connor, Jan-Karl Burkhardt, Jeremiah N. Johnson, Stephen R. Chen and Peter Kan

OBJECTIVE

Traditionally, stent-assisted coiling and balloon remodeling have been the primary endovascular treatments for wide-necked intracranial aneurysms with complex morphologies. PulseRider is an aneurysm neck reconstruction device that provides parent vessel protection for aneurysm coiling. The objective of this study was to report early postmarket results with the PulseRider device.

METHODS

This study was a prospective registry of patients treated with PulseRider at 13 American neurointerventional centers following FDA approval of this device. Data collected included clinical presentation, aneurysm characteristics, treatment details, and perioperative events. Follow-up data included degree of aneurysm occlusion and delayed (> 30 days after the procedure) complications.

RESULTS

A total of 54 aneurysms were treated, with the same number of PulseRider devices, across 13 centers. Fourteen cases were in off-label locations (7 anterior communicating artery, 6 middle cerebral artery, and 1 A1 segment anterior cerebral artery aneurysms). The average dome/neck ratio was 1.2. Technical success was achieved in 52 cases (96.2%). Major complications included the following: 3 procedure-related posterior cerebral artery strokes, a device-related intraoperative aneurysm rupture, and a delayed device thrombosis. Immediately postoperative Raymond-Roy occlusion classification (RROC) class 1 was achieved in 21 cases (40.3%), class 2 in 15 (28.8%), and class 3 in 16 cases (30.7%). Additional devices were used in 3 aneurysms. For those patients with 3- or 6-month angiographic follow-up (28 patients), 18 aneurysms (64.2%) were RROC class 1 and 8 (28.5%) were RROC class 2.

CONCLUSIONS

PulseRider is being used in both on- and off-label cases following FDA approval. The clinical and radiographic outcomes are comparable in real-world experience to the outcomes observed in earlier studies. Further experience is needed with the device to determine its role in the neurointerventionalist’s armamentarium, especially with regard to its off-label use.

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John D. Nerva, Peter S. Amenta and Aaron S. Dumont

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Shabari Girishan, Manjari Tripathi, Ajay Garg, Ramesh Doddamani, Jitin Bajaj, Bhargavi Ramanujam and P. Sarat Chandra

Objective

The authors sought to analyze the residual connections formed by the temporal stem as a cause for seizure recurrence following endoscopic vertical interhemispheric hemispherotomy and to review and compare lateral approach (perisylvian) with vertical approach surgical techniques to highlight the anatomical factors responsible for residual connections.

METHODS

This study was a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent endoscopic hemispherotomy for drug-resistant epilepsy. Postoperative MR images were analyzed. Specific attention was given to anatomical 3D-acquired thin-section T1 images to assess the extent of disconnection, which was confirmed with a diffusion tensor imaging sequence. Cadaver brain dissection was done to analyze the anatomical factors responsible for persistent connections.

RESULTS

Of 39 patients who underwent surgery, 80% (31/39) were seizure free (follow-up of 23.61 ± 8.25 months) following the first surgery. Thirty patients underwent postoperative MRI studies, which revealed persistent connections in 14 patients (11 temporal stem only; 3 temporal stem + amygdala + splenium). Eight of these 14 patients had persistent seizures. In 4 of these 8 patients, investigations revealed good concordance with the affected hemisphere, and repeat endoscopic disconnection of the residual connection was performed. Two of the 8 patients were lost to follow-up, and 2 had bihemispheric seizure onset. The 4 patients who underwent repeat endoscopic disconnection had seizure-free outcomes following the second surgery, increasing the good outcome total among all patients to 90% (35/39). Cadaveric brain dissection analysis revealed the anatomical factors responsible for the persistence of residual connections.

CONCLUSIONS

In endoscopic vertical approach interhemispheric hemispherotomy (and also vertical approach parasagittal hemispherotomy) the temporal stem, which lies deep and parallel to the plane of disconnection, is prone to be missed, which might lead to persistent or recurrent seizures. The recognition of this limitation can lead to improved seizure outcome. The amygdala and splenium are areas less commonly prone to be missed during surgery.

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Miner Ross, Priscilla S. Pang, Ahmed M. Raslan, Nathan R. Selden and Justin S. Cetas

OBJECTIVE

Conventional management of patients with neurotrauma frequently consists of routine, repeat head CT at preordained intervals with ICU-level monitoring, regardless of injury severity. The Brain Injury Guidelines (BIG) are a classification tool for stratifying patients into injury severity and risk-of-progression categories based on presenting clinical and radiographic findings. In the present study, the authors aimed to validate BIG criteria at a single level 1 trauma center.

METHODS

Patients were classified according to BIG criteria and evaluated for subsequent radiographic progression or development of neurological decline. A 2-year retrospective cohort review of consecutive patients with neurotrauma (n = 590) was undertaken. The authors then developed a modified BIG algorithm for use at their institution and followed its implementation prospectively over 555 consecutive patients.

RESULTS

In the retrospective analysis, no patient in the BIG 1 category (n = 88, 14.9%) demonstrated progression or neurological decline, and 7.5% of BIG 2 patients (n = 107, 18.1%) demonstrated mild radiographic progression without any decline or need for additional neurosurgical or medical intervention, whereas 15.4% of BIG 3 patients (n = 395, 66.9%) underwent additional neurosurgical procedures. In the prospective analysis, no BIG 1 (n = 105, 18.9%) or BIG 2 (n = 48, 8.6%) patients demonstrated a clinical decline or required any further neurosurgical intervention. By contrast, 12.9% of BIG 3 patients (n = 402, 72%) required immediate neurosurgical intervention, and a further 2.0% required delayed intervention based on clinical and/or radiographic evidence of injury progression.

CONCLUSIONS

Application of the BIG criteria in a single large level 1 trauma center reliably sorted patients into appropriate risk categories that accurately guided ongoing management.