Browse

You are looking at 91 - 100 of 33,299 items for

Restricted access

Antje Giede-Jeppe, Jonathan Reichl, Maximilian I. Sprügel, Hannes Lücking, Philip Hoelter, Ilker Y. Eyüpoglu, Joji B. Kuramatsu, Hagen B. Huttner and Stefan T. Gerner

OBJECTIVE

Stroke-associated immunosuppression and inflammation are increasingly recognized as factors triggering infections and thus potentially influencing outcome after stroke. Several studies have demonstrated that elevated neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a significant predictor of adverse outcomes for patients with ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage. Thus far, in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage the association between NLR and outcome is insufficiently established. The authors sought to investigate the association between NLR on admission and functional outcome in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH).

METHODS

This observational study included all consecutive aSAH patients admitted to a German tertiary center over a 5-year period (2008–2012). Data regarding patient demographics and clinical, laboratory, and in-hospital measures, as well as neuroradiological data, were retrieved from institutional databases. Functional outcome was assessed at 3 and 12 months using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score and categorized into favorable (mRS score 0–2) and unfavorable (mRS score 3–6). Patients’ radiological and laboratory characteristics were compared between aSAH patients with favorable and those with unfavorable outcome at 3 months. In addition, multivariate analysis was conducted to investigate parameters independently associated with favorable outcome. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was undertaken to identify the best cutoff for NLR to discriminate between favorable and unfavorable outcome in these patients. To account for imbalances in baseline characteristics, propensity score matching was carried out to assess the influence of NLR on outcome measures.

RESULTS

Overall, 319 patients with aSAH were included. Patients with unfavorable outcome at 3 months were older, had worse clinical status on admission (Glasgow Coma Scale score and Hunt and Hess grade), greater amount of subarachnoidal and intraventricular hemorrhage (modified Fisher Scale grade and Graeb score), and higher rates of infectious complications (pneumonia and sepsis). A significantly higher NLR on admission was observed in patients with unfavorable outcome according to mRS score (median [IQR] NLR 5.8 [3.0–10.0] for mRS score 0–2 vs NLR 8.3 [4.5–12.6] for mRS score 3–6; p < 0.001). After adjustments, NLR on admission remained a significant predictor for unfavorable outcome in SAH patients (OR [95% CI] 1.014 [1.001–1.027]; p = 0.028). In ROC analysis, an NLR of 7.05 was identified as the best cutoff value to discriminate between favorable and unfavorable outcome (area under the curve = 0.614, p < 0.001, Youden’s index = 0.211; mRS score 3–6: 94/153 [61.4%] for NLR ≥ 7.05 vs 67/166 [40.4%] for NLR < 7.05; p < 0.001). Subanalysis of patients with NLR levels ≥ 7.05 vs < 7.05, performed using 2 propensity score–matched cohorts (n = 133 patients in each group), revealed an increased proportion of patients with unfavorable functional outcome at 3 months in patients with NLR ≥ 7.05 (mRS score 3–6 at 3 months: NLR ≥ 7.05 82/133 [61.7%] vs NLR < 7.05 62/133 [46.6%]; p = 0.014), yet without differences in mortality at 3 months (NLR ≥ 7.05 37/133 [27.8%] vs NLR < 7.05 27/133 [20.3%]; p = 0.131).

CONCLUSIONS

Among aSAH patients, NLR represents an independent parameter associated with unfavorable functional outcome. Whether the impact of NLR on functional outcome is related to preexisting comorbidities or represents independent causal relationships in the context of stroke-associated immunosuppression should be investigated in future studies.

Free access

Avital Perry, Christopher S. Graffeo, Lucas P. Carlstrom, William J. Anding, Michael J. Link and Leonardo Rangel-Castilla

OBJECTIVE

Sylvian fissure dissection following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a challenging but fundamental skill in microneurosurgery, and one that has become increasingly difficult to develop during residency, given the overarching management trends. The authors describe a novel rodent model for simulation of sylvian fissure dissection and cerebrovascular bypass under SAH conditions.

METHODS

A standardized microvascular anastomosis model comprising rat femoral arteries and veins was used for the experimental framework. In the experimental protocol, following exposure and skeletonization of the vessels, extensive, superficial (1- to 2-mm) soft-tissue debridement was conducted and followed by wound closure and delayed reexploration at intervals of 7, 14, and 28 days. Two residents dissected 1 rat each per time point (n = 6 rats), completing vessel skeletonization followed by end-to-end artery/vein anastomoses. Videos were reviewed postprocedure to assess scar score and relative difficulty of dissection by blinded raters using 4-point Likert scales.

RESULTS

At all time points, vessels were markedly invested in friable scar, and exposure was subjectively assessed as a reasonable surrogate for sylvian fissure dissection under SAH conditions. Scar score and relative difficulty of dissection both indicated 14 days as the most challenging time point.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors’ experimental model of femoral vessel skeletonization, circumferential superficial soft-tissue injury, and delayed reexploration provides a novel approximation of sylvian fissure dissection and cerebrovascular bypass under SAH conditions. The optimal reexploration interval appears to be 7–14 days. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first model of SAH simulation for microsurgical training, particularly in a live animal system.

Restricted access

Jared C. Tishelman, Dennis Vasquez-Montes, David S. Jevotovsky, Nicholas Stekas, Michael J. Moses, Raj J. Karia, Thomas Errico, Aaron J. Buckland and Themistocles S. Protopsaltis

OBJECTIVE

The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) has become increasingly popular due to computer adaptive testing methodology. This study aims to validate the association between PROMIS and legacy outcome metrics and compare PROMIS to legacy metrics in terms of ceiling and floor effects and questionnaire burden.

METHODS

A retrospective review of an outcomes database was performed at a single institution from December 2016 to April 2017. Inclusion criteria were age > 18 years and a chief complaint of back pain or neck pain. The PROMIS computer adaptive testing Pain Interference, Physical Function (PF), and Pain Intensity domains; Oswestry Disability Index (ODI); Neck Disability Index (NDI); and visual analog scale (VAS) back, VAS leg, VAS neck, and VAS arm were completed in random order. PROMIS was compared to legacy metrics in terms of the average number of questions needed to complete each questionnaire and the score distributions in the lower and higher bounds of scores.

RESULTS

A total of 494 patients with back pain and 130 patients with neck pain were included. For back pain, ODI showed a strong correlation with PROMIS-PF (R = −0.749, p < 0.001), Pain Intensity (R = 0.709, p < 0.001), and Pain Interference (R = 0.790, p < 0.001) domains. Additionally, the PROMIS Pain Intensity domain correlated to both VAS back and neck pain (R = 0.642, p < 0.001 for both). PROMIS-PF took significantly fewer questions to complete compared to the ODI (4.123 vs 9.906, p < 0.001). When assessing for instrument sensitivity, neither survey presented a significant ceiling and floor effect in the back pain population (ODI: 0.40% and 2.63%; PROMIS-PF: 0.60% and 1.41%). In the neck pain cohort, NDI showed a strong correlation with PROMIS-PF (R = 0.771, p < 0.001). Additionally, PROMIS Pain Intensity correlated to VAS neck (R = 0.642, p < 0.001). The mean number of questions required to complete the questionnaire was much lower for PROMIS-PF compared to NDI (4.417 vs 10, p < 0.001). There were no significant differences found in terms of ceiling and floor effects for neck complaints (NDI: 2.3% and 6.92%; PROMIS-PF: 0.00% and 5.38%) or back complaints (ODI: 0.40% and 2.63%; PROMIS-PF: 1.41% and 0.60%).

CONCLUSIONS

PROMIS correlates strongly with traditional disability measures in patients with back pain and neck pain. For both back and neck pain, the PROMIS-PF required patients to answer significantly fewer questions to achieve similar granularity. There were no significant differences in ceiling and floor effects for NDI or ODI when compared with the PROMIS-PF instrument.

Restricted access

Daniel J. Cognetti, Amer F. Samdani, Joshua M. Pahys, Mari L. Groves and Steven W. Hwang

Growing rod surgery for skeletally immature patients helps correct severe scoliosis while allowing continued spinal column growth. Previous reports have studied vertebral body changes following growing rod surgery, but there are currently no published reports on alterations in pedicle morphology. Given the potential need for definitive spinal fusion with pedicle screw instrumentation, an awareness of changes in pedicle morphology is critical. A morphometric analysis of pedicles was performed using 3D reconstructions of 3 CT scans (preoperative and at 3 and 6 years) obtained in a young girl with infantile idiopathic scoliosis (T7 apex) who underwent unilateral rib-to-spine growing rod (2nd–4th ribs to L1) implantation with lengthening every 6 months for 6 years. The pedicle widths on the growing rod side from T5 to T9 (apex ± 2) were all smaller at 6 years postoperatively than preoperatively, while the same-level pedicles opposite the device significantly increased in width. These findings support anecdotal intraoperative reports by surgeons and provide evidence of pedicle stress shielding due to growing rod distraction and force deprivation.

Restricted access

Ching-Chung Ko, Tai-Yuan Chen, Sher-Wei Lim, Yu-Ting Kuo, Te-Chang Wu and Jeon-Hor Chen

OBJECTIVE

A subset of benign, nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas (NFMAs) has been shown to undergo early progression/recurrence (P/R) during the first years after surgical resection. The aim of this study was to determine preoperative MR imaging features for the prediction of P/R in benign solid NFMAs, with emphasis on apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values.

METHODS

We retrospectively investigated the preoperative MR imaging features for the prediction of P/R in benign solid NFMAs. Only the patients who had undergone preoperative MRI and postoperative MRI follow-ups for more than 1 year (at least every 6–12 months) were included. From November 2010 to December 2016, a total of 30 patients diagnosed with benign solid NFMAs were included (median follow-up time 45 months), and 19 (63.3%) patients had P/R (median time to P/R 24 months).

RESULTS

Benign solid NFMAs with cavernous sinus invasion, failed chiasmatic decompression, large tumor height and tumor volume, high diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) signal, and lower ADC values/ratios were significantly associated with P/R (p < 0.05). The cutoff points of ADC value and ADC ratio for prediction of P/R are 0.77 × 10−3 mm2/sec and 1.01, respectively, with area under the curve (AUC) values (0.9 and 0.91) (p < 0.01). In multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis, low ADC value (< 0.77 × 10−3 mm2/sec) is a high-risk factor of P/R (p < 0.05) with a hazard ratio of 14.07.

CONCLUSIONS

Benign solid NFMAs with low ADC values/ratios are at a significantly increased risk of P/R, and aggressive treatments accompanied by close follow-up with imaging studies should be considered.

Restricted access

Dil V. Patel, Mundeep S. Bawa, Brittany E. Haws, Benjamin Khechen, Andrew M. Block, Sailee S. Karmarkar, Eric H. Lamoutte and Kern Singh

OBJECTIVE

This study aimed to determine if the preoperative Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System, Physical Function (PROMIS PF) score is predictive of immediate postoperative patient pain and narcotics consumption or long-term patient-reported outcomes (PROs) following minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF).

METHODS

A prospectively maintained database was retrospectively reviewed. Patients who underwent primary, single-level MIS TLIF for degenerative pathology were identified and grouped by their preoperative PROMIS PF scores: mild disability (score 40–50), moderate disability (score 30–39.9), and severe disability (score 20–29.9). Postoperative pain was quantified using the visual analog scale (VAS), and narcotics consumption was quantified using Oral Morphine Equivalents. PROMIS PF, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey, Physical Component Summary (SF-12 PCS), and VAS back and leg pain were collected preoperatively and at 6-week, 3-month, 6-month, and 12-month follow-up. Preoperative PROMIS PF subgroups were tested for an association with demographic and perioperative characteristics using 1-way ANOVA or chi-square analysis. Preoperative PROMIS PF subgroups were tested for an association with immediate postoperative pain and narcotics consumption in addition to improvements in PROMIS PF, ODI, SF-12 PCS, and VAS back and leg pain by using linear regression controlling for statistically different demographic characteristics.

RESULTS

A total of 130 patients were included in this analysis. Patients were grouped by their preoperative PROMIS PF scores: 15.4% had mild disability, 63.8% had moderate disability, and 20.8% had severe disability. There were no significant differences among the subgroups in terms of age, sex, smoking status, and comorbidity burden. Patients with greater disability were more likely to be obese and to have workers’ compensation insurance. There were no differences among subgroups in regard to operative levels, operative time, estimated blood loss, and hospital length of stay. Patients with greater disability reported higher VAS pain scores and narcotics consumption for postoperative day 0 and postoperative day 1. Patients with greater preoperative disability demonstrated lower PROMIS PF, ODI, SF-12 PCS, and worse VAS pain scores at each postoperative time point.

CONCLUSIONS

Patients with worse preoperative disability, as assessed by PROMIS PF, experienced increased pain and narcotics consumption, along with less improvement in long-term PROs. The authors conclude that PROMIS PF is an efficient and accurate instrument that can quickly assess patient disability in the preoperative period and predict both short-term and long-term surgical outcomes.

Free access

Prospective multicenter studies in pediatric hydrocephalus

JNSPG 75th Anniversary Invited Review Article

John R. W. Kestle and Jay Riva-Cambrin

Prospective multicenter clinical research studies in pediatric hydrocephalus are relatively rare. They cover a broad spectrum of hydrocephalus topics, including management of intraventricular hemorrhage in premature infants, shunt techniques and equipment, shunt outcomes, endoscopic treatment of hydrocephalus, and prevention and treatment of infection. The research methodologies include randomized trials, cohort studies, and registry-based studies. This review describes prospective multicenter studies in pediatric hydrocephalus since 1990. Many studies have included all forms of hydrocephalus and used device or procedure failure as the primary outcome. Although such studies have yielded useful findings, they might miss important treatment effects in specific subgroups. As multicenter study networks grow, larger patient numbers will allow studies with more focused entry criteria based on known and evolving prognostic factors. In addition, increased use of patient-centered outcomes such as neurodevelopmental assessment and quality of life should be measured and emphasized in study results. Well-planned multicenter clinical studies can significantly affect the care of children with hydrocephalus and will continue to have an important role in improving care for these children and their families.

Free access

Kristine Ravina, Ben A. Strickland, Robert C. Rennert, Joseph N. Carey and Jonathan J. Russin

Graft stenosis and occlusion remain formidable complications in cerebral revascularization procedures, which can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Graft vasospasm can result in early postoperative graft stenosis and occlusion and is believed to be at least partially mediated through adrenergic pathways. Despite various published treatment protocols, there is no single effective spasmolytic agent. Multiple factors, including anatomical and physiological variability in revascularization conduits, patient age, and comorbidities, have been associated with graft vasospasm pathogenesis and response to spasmolytics. The ideal spasmolytic agent thus likely needs to target multiple pathways to exert a generalizable therapeutic effect. Botulinum toxin (BTX)–A is a powerful neurotoxin widely used in clinical practice for the treatment of a variety of spastic conditions. Although its commonly described paradigm of cholinergic neural transmission blockade has been widely accepted, evidence for other mechanisms of action including inhibition of adrenergic transmission have been described in animal studies. Recently, the first pilot study demonstrating clinical use of BTX-A for cerebral revascularization graft spasm prevention has been reported. In this review, the mechanistic basis and potential future clinical role of BTX-A in graft vasospasm prevention is discussed.

Restricted access

Fran A. Hardaway, Katherine Holste, Gulsah Ozturk, David Pettersson, Jeffrey M. Pollock, Kim J. Burchiel and Ahmed M. Raslan

OBJECTIVE

The pathophysiology of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) in patients without neurovascular compression (NVC) is not completely understood. The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the hypothesis that TN patients without NVC differ from TN patient with NVC with respect to brain anatomy and demographic characteristics.

METHODS

Six anatomical brain measurements from high-resolution brain MR images were tabulated; anterior-posterior (AP) prepontine cistern length, cerebellopontine angle (CPA) cistern volume, nerve-to-nerve distance, symptomatic nerve length, pons volume, and posterior fossa volume were assessed on OsiriX. Brain MRI anatomical measurements from 232 patients with either TN type 1 or TN type 2 (TN group) were compared with measurements obtained in 100 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (control group). Two-way ANOVA tests were conducted on the 6 measurements relative to group and NVC status. Bonferroni adjustments were used to correct for multiple comparisons. A nonhierarchical k-means cluster analysis was performed on the TN group using age and posterior fossa volume as independent variables.

RESULTS

Within the TN group, females were found to be younger than males and less likely to have NVC. The odds ratio (OR) of females not having NVC compared to males was 2.7 (95% CI 1.3–5.5, p = 0.017). Patients younger than 30 years were much less likely to have NVC compared to older patients (OR 4.9, 95% CI 1.3–18.4, p = 0.017). The mean AP prepontine cistern length and symptomatic nerve length were smaller in the TN group than in the control group (5.3 vs 6.5 mm and 8.7 vs 9.7 mm, respectively; p < 0.001). The posterior fossa volume was significantly smaller in TN patients without NVC compared to those with NVC. A TN group cluster analysis suggested a sex-dependent difference that was not observed in those without NVC. Factorial ANOVA and post hoc testing found that findings in males without NVC were significantly different from those in controls or male TN patients with NVC and similar to those in females (female controls as well as female TN patients with or without NVC).

CONCLUSIONS

Posterior fossa volume in males was larger than posterior fossa volume in females. This finding, along with the higher incidence of TN in females, suggests that smaller posterior fossa volume might be an independent factor in the pathophysiology of TN, which warrants further study.

Free access

Danielle Golub, Lizbeth Hu, Siddhant Dogra, Jose Torres and Maksim Shapiro

Spontaneous cervical artery dissection (sCAD) is a major cause of stroke in young adults. Multiple sCAD is a rarer, more poorly understood presentation of sCAD that has been increasingly attributed to cervical trauma such as spinal manipulation or genetic polymorphisms in extracellular matrix components. The authors present the case of a 49-year-old, otherwise healthy woman, who over the course of 2 weeks developed progressive, hemodynamically significant, bilateral internal carotid artery and vertebral artery dissections. Collateral response involved extensive external carotid artery–internal carotid artery anastomoses via the ophthalmic artery, which were instrumental in maintaining perfusion because circle of Willis and leptomeningeal anastomotic responses were hampered by the dissection burden in the corresponding collateral vessels. Endovascular intervention by placement of Pipeline embolization devices and Atlas stents in bilateral internal carotid arteries was successfully performed. No syndromic or systemic etiology was discovered during a thorough workup.