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Greg Bowden, Hideyuki Kano, Ellen Caparosa, Seong-Hyun Park, Ajay Niranjan, John Flickinger and L. Dade Lunsford

OBJECT

Non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most frequent cancer that metastasizes to brain. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has become the management of choice for most patients with such metastatic tumors. Therefore, the authors endeavored to elucidate the survival and SRS outcomes for patients with NSCLC metastasis at their center.

METHODS

In this single-institution retrospective analysis, the authors reviewed their experience with NSCLC metastasis during a 10-year period from 2001 to 2010. Seven hundred twenty patients underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery. A total of 1004 SRS procedures were performed, and 3143 tumors were treated. The NSCLC subtype was adenocarcinoma in 386 patients, squamous cell carcinoma in 111 patients, and large cell carcinoma in 34 patients. The median aggregate tumor volume was 4.5 cm3 (range 0.1–88 cm3).

RESULTS

The median survival time after diagnosis of brain metastasis from NSCLC was 12.6 months, and the median survival after SRS was 8.5 months. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates after SRS were 39%, 21%, and 10%, respectively. Postradiosurgery survival was decreased in patients treated with prior whole-brain radiation therapy compared with SRS alone (p = 0.003). Aggregate tumor volume was inversely related to survival after SRS (p < 0.001), and the histological subgroups demonstrated significant survival differences (p = 0.023). The overall local tumor control rate in the entire group was 92.8%. One hundred seventy-four patients (24%) underwent repeat SRS for new or resistant metastatic deposits.

CONCLUSIONS

Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective means of providing local control for NSCLC metastases. Neurological function and survival benefit from serial patient monitoring and repeat SRS for new tumors.

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Greg Bowden, Hideyuki Kano, Ellen Caparosa, Daniel Tonetti, Ajay Niranjan, Edward A. Monaco III, John Flickinger, Yoshio Arai and L. Dade Lunsford

OBJECT

A visual field deficit resulting from the management of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) significantly impacts a patient's quality of life. The present study was designed to investigate the clinical and radiological outcomes of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) performed for AVMs involving the postgeniculate visual pathway.

METHODS

In this retrospective single-institution analysis, the authors reviewed their experience with Gamma Knife surgery for postgeniculate visual pathway AVMs performed during the period between 1987 and 2009.

RESULTS

During the study interval, 171 patients underwent SRS for AVMs in this region. Forty-one patients (24%) had a visual deficit prior to SRS. The median target volume was 6.0 cm3 (range 0.4–22 cm3), and 19 Gy (range 14–25 Gy) was the median margin dose. Obliteration of the AVM was confirmed in 80 patients after a single SRS procedure at a median follow-up of 74 months (range 5–297 months). The actuarial rate of total obliteration was 67% at 4 years. Arteriovenous malformations with a volume < 5 cm3 had obliteration rates of 60% at 3 years and 79% at 4 years. The delivered margin dose proved significant given that 82% of patients receiving ≥ 22 Gy had complete obliteration. The AVM was completely obliterated in an additional 18 patients after they underwent repeat SRS. At a median of 25 months (range 11–107 months) after SRS, 9 patients developed new or worsened visual field deficits. One patient developed a complete homonymous hemianopia, and 8 patients developed quadrantanopias. The actuarial risk of sustaining a new visual deficit was 3% at 3 years, 5% at 5 years, and 8% at 10 years. Fifteen patients had hemorrhage during the latency period, resulting in death in 9 of the patients. The annual hemorrhage rate during the latency interval was 2%, and no hemorrhages occurred after confirmed obliteration.

CONCLUSIONS

Despite an overall treatment mortality of 5%, related to latency interval hemorrhage, SRS was associated with only a 5.6% risk of new visual deficit and a final obliteration rate close to 80% in patients with AVMs of the postgeniculate visual pathway.

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Zachary J. Tempel, Srinivas Chivukula, Edward A. Monaco III, Greg Bowden, Hideyuki Kano, Ajay Niranjan, Edward F. Chang, Penny K. Sneed, Anthony M. Kaufmann, Jason Sheehan, David Mathieu and L. Dade Lunsford

OBJECT

Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) is the least invasive treatment option for medically refractory, intractable trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and is especially valuable for treating elderly, infirm patients or those on anticoagulation therapy. The authors reviewed pain outcomes and complications in TN patients who required 3 radiosurgical procedures for recurrent or persistent pain.

METHODS

A retrospective review of all patients who underwent 3 GKRS procedures for TN at 4 participating centers of the North American Gamma Knife Consortium from 1995 to 2012 was performed. The Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) pain score was used to evaluate pain outcomes.

RESULTS

Seventeen patients were identified; 7 were male and 10 were female. The mean age at the time of last GKRS was 79.6 years (range 51.2–95.6 years). The TN was Type I in 16 patients and Type II in 1 patient. No patient suffered from multiple sclerosis. Eight patients (47.1%) reported initial complete pain relief (BNI Score I) following their third GKRS and 8 others (47.1%) experienced at least partial relief (BNI Scores II–IIIb). The average time to initial response was 2.9 months following the third GKRS. Although 3 patients (17.6%) developed new facial sensory dysfunction following primary GKRS and 2 patients (11.8%) experienced new or worsening sensory disturbance following the second GKRS, no patient sustained additional sensory disturbances after the third procedure. At a mean follow-up of 22.9 months following the third GKRS, 6 patients (35.3%) reported continued Score I complete pain relief, while 7 others (41.2%) reported pain improvement (BNI Scores II–IIIb). Four patients (23.5%) suffered recurrent TN following the third procedure at a mean interval of 19.1 months.

CONCLUSIONS

A third GKRS resulted in pain reduction with a low risk of additional complications in most patients with medically refractory and recurrent, intractable TN. In patients unsuitable for other microsurgical or percutaneous strategies, especially those receiving long-term oral anticoagulation or antiplatelet agents, GKRS repeated for a third time was a satisfactory, low risk option.

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Greg Bowden, Hideyuki Kano, Huai-che Yang, Ajay Niranjan, John Flickinger and L. Dade Lunsford

Object

The outcomes of stereotactic radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) within or adjacent to the ventricular system are largely unknown. This study assessed the long-term outcomes and hemorrhage risks for patients with AVMs within this region who underwent Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) at the University of Pittsburgh.

Methods

The authors retrospectively identified 188 patients with ventricular-region AVMs who underwent a single-stage GKS procedure during a 22-year interval. The median patient age was 32 years (range 3–80 years), the median target volume was 4.6 cm3 (range 0.1–22 cm3), and the median marginal dose was 20 Gy (range 13–27 Gy).

Results

Arteriovenous malformation obliteration was confirmed by MRI or angiography in 89 patients during a median follow-up of 65 months (range 2–265 months). The actuarial rates of total obliteration were 32% at 3 years, 55% at 4 years, 60% at 5 years, and 64% at 10 years. Higher rates of AVM obliteration were obtained in the 26 patients with intraventricular AVMs. Twenty-five patients (13%) sustained a hemorrhage during the initial latency interval after GKS, indicating an annual hemorrhage rate of 3.4% prior to AVM obliteration. No patient experienced a hemorrhage after AVM obliteration was confirmed by imaging. Permanent neurological deficits due to adverse radiation effects developed in 7 patients (4%).

Conclusions

Although patients in this study demonstrated an elevated hemorrhage risk that remained until complete obliteration, GKS still proved to be a generally safe and effective treatment for patients with these high-risk intraventricular and periventriclar AVMs.

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Greg Bowden, Hideyuki Kano, Daniel Tonetti, Ajay Niranjan, John Flickinger, Yoshio Arai and L. Dade Lunsford

Object

Sylvian fissure arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) present substantial management challenges because of the critical adjacent blood vessels and functional brain. The authors investigated the outcomes, especially hemorrhage and seizure activity, after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of AVMs within or adjacent to the sylvian fissure.

Methods

This retrospective single-institution analysis examined the authors' experiences with Gamma Knife surgery for AVMs of the sylvian fissure in cases treated from 1987 through 2009. During this time, 87 patients underwent SRS for AVMs in the region of the sylvian fissure. Before undergoing SRS, 40 (46%) of these patients had experienced hemorrhage and 36 (41%) had had seizures. The median target volume of the AVM was 3.85 cm3 (range 0.1–17.7 cm3), and the median marginal dose of radiation was 20 Gy (range 13–25 Gy).

Results

Over a median follow-up period of 64 months (range 3–275 months), AVM obliteration was confirmed by MRI or angiography for 43 patients. The actuarial rates of confirmation of total obliteration were 35% at 3 years, 60% at 4 and 5 years, and 76% at 10 years. Of the 36 patients who had experienced seizures before SRS, 19 (53%) achieved outcomes of Engel class I after treatment. The rate of seizure improvement was 29% at 3 years, 36% at 5 years, 50% at 10 years, and 60% at 15 years. No seizures developed after SRS in patients who had been seizure free before treatment. The actuarial rate of AVM hemorrhage after SRS was 5% at 1, 5, and 10 years. This rate equated to an annual hemorrhage rate during the latency interval of 1%; no hemorrhages occurred after confirmed obliteration. No permanent neurological deficits developed as an adverse effect of radiation; however, delayed cyst formation occurred in 3 patients.

Conclusions

Stereotactic radiosurgery was an effective treatment for AVMs within the region of the sylvian fissure, particularly for smaller-volume AVMs. After SRS, a low rate of hemorrhage and improved seizure control were also evident.

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Greg Bowden, Hideyuki Kano, Daniel Tonetti, Ajay Niranjan, John Flickinger and L. Dade Lunsford

Object

Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the posterior fossa have an aggressive natural history and propensity for hemorrhage. Although the cerebellum accounts for the majority of the posterior fossa volume, there is a paucity of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) outcome data for AVMs of this region. The authors sought to evaluate the long-term outcomes and risks of cerebellar AVM radiosurgery.

Methods

This single-institution retrospective analysis reviewed the authors' experience with Gamma Knife surgery during the period 1987–2007. During this time 64 patients (median age 47 years, range 8–75 years) underwent SRS for a cerebellar AVM. Forty-seven patients (73%) presented with an intracranial hemorrhage. The median target volume was 3.85 cm3 (range 0.2–12.5 cm3), and the median marginal dose was 21 Gy (range 15–25 Gy).

Results

Arteriovenous malformation obliteration was confirmed by MRI or angiography in 40 patients at a median follow-up of 73 months (range 4–255 months). The actuarial rates of total obliteration were 53% at 3 years, 69% at 4 years, and 76% at 5 and 10 years. Elevated obliteration rates were statistically higher in patients who underwent AVM SRS without prior embolization (p = 0.005). A smaller AVM volume was also associated with a higher rate of obliteration (p = 0.03). Four patients (6%) sustained a hemorrhage during the latency period and 3 died. The cumulative rates of AVM hemorrhage after SRS were 6% at 1, 5, and 10 years. This correlated with an overall annual hemorrhage rate of 2.0% during the latency interval. One patient experienced a hemorrhage 9 years after confirmed MRI and angiographic obliteration. A permanent neurological deficit due to adverse radiation effects developed in 1 patient (1.6%) and temporary complications were seen in 2 additional patients (3.1%).

Conclusions

Stereotactic radiosurgery proved to be most effective for patients with smaller and previously nonembolized cerebellar malformations. Hemorrhage during the latency period occurred at a rate of 2.0% per year until obliteration occurred.