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Brian J. Williams, Chun Po Yen, Robert M. Starke, Bhuvaneswara Basina, James Nguyen, Jessica Rainey, Jonathan H. Sherman, David Schlesinger and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

Stereotactic radiosurgery serves as an important primary and adjuvant treatment option for patients with many types of intracranial meningiomas. This is particularly true for patients with parasellar meningiomas. In this study, the authors evaluated the outcomes of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) used to treat parasellar meningiomas.

Methods

The study is a retrospective review of the outcomes in 138 patients with meningiomas treated at the University of Virginia from 1989 to 2006; all patients had a minimum follow-up of 24 months. There were 31 men and 107 women whose mean age was 54 years (range 19–85 years). Eighty-four patients had previously undergone resection. The mean pre-GKS tumor volume was 7.5 ml (range 0.2–54.8 ml). Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed, and factors related to favorable outcomes in each case were assessed.

Results

The mean follow-up duration was 84 months (median 75.5 months, range 24–216 months). In 118 patients (86%), the tumor volume was unchanged or had decreased at last follow-up. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated radiographic progression-free survival at 5 and 10 years to be 95.4% and 69%, respectively. Fourteen patients (10%) developed new cranial nerve palsies following GKS. Factors associated with tumor control included younger age, a higher isodose, and smaller tumor volume. A longer follow-up duration was associated with either a decrease or increase in tumor volume. Fourteen patients (10%) experienced new or worsening cranial nerve deficits after treatment. Factors associated with this occurrence were larger pretreatment tumor volume, lower peripheral radiation dose, lower maximum dose, tumor progression, and longer follow-up.

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery offers an acceptable rate of tumor control for parasellar meningiomas and accomplishes this with a low incidence of neurological deficits. Radiological control after radiosurgery is more likely in those patients with a smaller tumor volume and a higher prescription dose.

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Robert M. Starke, James H. Nguyen, Jessica Rainey, Brian J. Williams, Jonathan H. Sherman, Jesse Savage, Chun Po Yen and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

Although numerous studies have analyzed the role of stereotactic radiosurgery for intracranial meningiomas, few studies have assessed outcomes of posterior fossa meningiomas after stereotactic radiosurgery. In this study, the authors evaluate the outcomes of posterior fossa meningiomas treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS). The authors also assess factors predictive of new postoperative neurological deficits and tumor progression.

Methods

A retrospective review was performed of a prospectively compiled database documenting the outcomes of 152 patients with posterior fossa meningiomas treated at the University of Virginia from 1990 to 2006. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 24 months. There were 30 males and 122 females, with a median age of 58 years (range 12–82 years). Seventy-five patients were treated with radiosurgery initially, and 77 patients were treated with GKS after resection. Patients were assessed clinically and radiographically at routine intervals following GKS. Factors predictive of new neurological deficit following GKS were assessed via univariate and multivariate analysis, and Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox multivariate regression analysis were used to assess factors predictive of tumor progression.

Results

Patients had meningiomas centered over the tentorium (35 patients, 23%), cerebellopontine angle (43 patients, 28%), petroclival region (28 patients, 18%), petrous region (6 patients, 4%), and clivus (40 patients, 26%). The median follow-up was 7 years (range 2–16 years). The mean preradiosurgical tumor volume was 5.7 cm3 (range 0.3–33 cm3), and mean postradiosurgical tumor volume was 4.9 cm3 (range 0.1–33 cm3). At last follow-up, 55 patients (36%) displayed no change in tumor volume, 78 (51%) displayed a decrease in volume, and 19 (13%) displayed an increase in volume. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated radiographic progression-free survival at 3, 5, and 10 years to be 98%, 96%, and 78%, respectively. In Cox multivariable analysis, pre-GKS covariates associated with tumor progression included age greater than 65 years (hazard ratio [HR] 3.24, 95% CI 1.12–9.37; p = 0.03) and a low dose to the tumor margin (HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.60–0.97; p = 0.03), and post-GKS covariates included shunt-dependent hydrocephalus (HR 25.0, 95% CI 3.72–100.0; p = 0.001). At last clinical follow-up, 139 patients (91%) demonstrated no change or improvement in their neurological condition, and 13 patients showed symptom deterioration (9%). In multivariate analysis, the only factors predictive of new or worsening symptoms were clival or petrous location (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.1–13.7; p = 0.03).

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery offers an acceptable rate of tumor control for posterior fossa meningiomas and accomplishes this with a low incidence of neurological deficits. In patients selected for GKS, tumor progression is associated with age greater than 65 years and decreasing dose to the tumor margin. Clival- or petrous-based locations are predictive of an increased risk of new or worsening neurological deficit following GKS.

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Chun Po Yen, Stephen J. Monteith, James H. Nguyen, Jessica Rainey, David J. Schlesinger and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term imaging and clinical outcomes of intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in children treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS).

Methods

Between 1989 and 2007, 200 patients with AVMs who were 18 years of age or younger were treated at the University of Virginia Health System. Excluding 14 patients who had not reached 2-year follow-up, 186 patients comprised this study. Hemorrhage was the most common presenting symptom leading to the diagnosis of AVMs (71.5%). The mean nidus volume was 3.2 cm3 at the time of GKS, and a mean prescription dose of 21.9 Gy was used.

Results

After initial GKS, 49.5% of patients achieved total angiographic obliteration. Forty-one patients whose AVM nidi remained patent underwent additional GKS. The obliteration rate increased to 58.6% after a second or multiple GKS. Subtotal obliteration was achieved in 9 patients (4.8%). Forty-nine patients (26.3%) still had a patent residual nidus. In 19 patients (10.2%), obliteration was confirmed on MR imaging only. Ten patients had 17 hemorrhages during the follow-up period. The hemorrhage rate was 5.4% within 2 years after GKS and 0.8% between 2 and 5 years. Six patients developed neurological deficits along with the radiation-induced changes. Two patients developed asymptomatic meningiomas 10 and 12 years after GKS. After a mean clinical follow-up of 98 months, less than 4% of patients had difficulty attending school or developing a career.

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery offers a reasonable chance of obliteration of an AVM in pediatric patients. The incidence of symptomatic radiation-induced changes is relatively low; however, long-term clinical and imaging follow-up is required to identify delayed cyst formation and secondary tumors.

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Rupa Gopalan, Kasandra Dassoulas, Jessica Rainey, Jonathan H. Sherman and Jason P. Sheehan

✓ The management of craniopharyngioma involves balancing adequate reduction in tumor volume and prevention of recurrence while minimizing damage to delicate surrounding structures. Because of the lesion's proximity to the optic chiasm and its relationship to the hypothalamic–pituitary axis, morbidity rates following treatment can be high. Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) is now being considered as a viable method of providing tumor control while ensuring minimal side effects. The authors conducted a literature review of 10 studies in which GKS was used to treat craniopharyngioma; some lesions had been previously treated and some had not. The mean marginal dose ranged from 5 to 16.4 Gy (mean 12.3 Gy). Tumor control was achieved in 75% of cases overall and varied with tumor subtype (cystic, solid, mixed). Control was seen in 90% of solid, 80% of cystic, and 59% of mixed tumors. The overall morbidity rate resulting from radiosurgery was 4% and the overall mortality rate was 0.5%. These results suggest that GKS may provide a favorable benefit-to-risk profile for many patients with craniopharyngiomas.