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Venelin M. Gerganov, Ariyan Pirayesh, Mohsen Nouri, Nirjhar Hore, Wolf O. Luedemann, Shizuo Oi, Amir Samii and Madjid Samii

Object

The current, generally accepted optimal management for hydrocephalus related to vestibular schwannomas (VSs) is primary tumor removal, with further treatment reserved only for patients who remain symptomatic. Previous studies have shown, however, that this management can lead to an increase in surgery-related complications. In this study, the authors evaluated their experience with the treatment of such patients, with the aim of identifying the following: 1) the parameters correlating to the need for specific hydrocephalus treatment following VS surgery; and 2) patients at risk for developing hydrocephalus-related complications.

Methods

This was a retrospective study of a 400-patient series. The complication rates and outcomes following primary hydrocephalus treatment versus primary VS removal were compared. Patients undergoing primary tumor removal were further subdivided on the basis of the need for subsequent hydrocephalus treatment. The 3 categories of parameters tested for correlation with the need for such subsequent treatment as well as with heightened risk for developing complications were patient-, tumor-, and hydrocephalus-related.

Results

Of the entire series, 53 patients presented with hydrocephalus. Forty-eight of 53 patients underwent primary VS surgery, of whom 42 (87.5%) did not require additional hydrocephalus treatment. Of the 6 patients who did require additional hydrocephalus treatment, only 3 ultimately required a VP shunt. Factors correlating to the need of hydrocephalus treatment after VS removal were large tumor size, irregular tumor surface, and severe preoperative hydrocephalus. Patients with a longer symptom duration prior to surgery, those with polycyclic tumors, or with inhomogeneous VS, were at heightened risk for the development of CSF leaks. The general and functional outcome of surgery showed no correlation to the presence of preoperative hydrocephalus.

Conclusions

Primary tumor removal is the optimum management of disease in patients with VS with associated hydrocephalus; it leads to resolution of the hydrocephalus in the majority of cases, and the outcome is similar to that of patients without hydrocephalus. Certain factors may aid in identifying patients at risk for developing persistent hydrocephalus as well as those at risk for CSF leaks.

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Lennart H. Stieglitz, Karsten H. Wrede, Alireza Gharabaghi, Venelin M. Gerganov, Amir Samii, Madjid Samii and Wolf O. Luedemann

Object

The aim of this study was to identify patients likely to develop CSF leaks after vestibular schwannoma surgery using a retrospective analysis for the identification of risk factors.

Methods

Between January 2001 and December 2006, 420 patients underwent retrosigmoidal microsurgical tumor removal in a standardized procedure. Of these 420 patients, 363 underwent treatment for the first time, and 27 suffered from recurrent tumors. Twenty-six patients had bilateral tumors due to neurofibromatosis Type 2, and 4 patients had previously undergone radiosurgical treatment. An analysis was performed to examine the incidence of postoperative CSF fistulas in all 4 groups.

Results

The incidence of CSF leakage was higher in the tumor recurrence group (11.1%) than in patients undergoing surgery for the first time (4.4%). There were no CSF fistulas in the neurofibromatosis Type 2 group or in patients with preoperative radiosurgical treatment. Tumor size was identified as a possible risk factor in a previous study.

Conclusions

Surgery for recurrent tumors is a significant risk factor for the development of CSF leaks.

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Wolf O. Luedemann, Marcos S. Tatagiba, Sami Hussein and Madjid Samii

✓ The authors report the case of a 27-year-old woman with an arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) associated with atlantoaxial subluxation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of its kind. The authors review the literature with reference to dysraphic abnormalities associated with atlantoaxial subluxation and with AMC. The patient presented with severe tetraparesis following a minor traffic accident. She underwent a procedure in which transoral decompression and dorsal stabilization were performed and, postoperatively, made a good clinical outcome. The authors stress the need for diagnostic neuroimaging of the craniocervical junction in patients with AMC.