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  • By Author: Oldfield, Edward H. x
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Russell R. Lonser, John A. Butman, Kristin Huntoon, Ashok R. Asthagiri, Tianxia Wu, Kamran D. Bakhtian, Emily Y. Chew, Zhengping Zhuang, W. Marston Linehan and Edward H. Oldfield

Object

The tumors most frequently associated with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease are hemangioblastomas. While they are associated with significant neurological impairment and mortality, their natural history and optimal management have not been fully defined.

Methods

Patients with VHL were enrolled in a prospective study designed to define the natural history of CNS hemangioblastomas. In the present analysis, serial imaging, laboratory, genetic, and clinical data were evaluated in those with at least 2 years of follow-up data.

Results

At study entrance 225 patients (111 males, 114 females) harbored 1921 CNS hemangioblastomas in the supratentorial compartment (21 tumors [1%]), cerebellum (865 [45%]), brainstem (129 [7%]), spinal cord (689 [36%]), cauda equina (212 [11%]), and nerve roots (5 [0.3%]; follow-up 15,819 hemangioblastoma-years). Increased tumor burden was associated with partial deletions in the VHL gene (p = 0.005) and male sex (p = 0.002). Hemangioblastoma development (median 0.3 new tumors/year) was associated with younger age (p < 0.0001) and more tumors at study entrance (p < 0.0001). While 1278 hemangioblastomas (51%) did not grow, 1227 hemangioblastomas (49%) grew in a saltatory (886 [72%]), linear (76 [6%]), or exponential (264 [22%]) pattern. Faster tumor growth was associated with male sex (p = 0.001), symptomatic tumors (p < 0.0001), and tumors associated with cysts (p < 0.0001). Location-dependent tumor size was the primary predictor of eventual symptom formation (159 symptomatic tumors [6.3%]; area under the curve > 0.9).

Conclusions

Central nervous system hemangioblastoma burden in VHL is associated with partial germline deletions and male sex. Unpredictable growth of hemangioblastomas compromises assessment of nonsurgical therapies. The judicious treatment of symptom-producing hemangioblastomas, while avoiding unnecessary treatment of asymptomatic tumors that may not progress, can provide clinical stability. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00005902 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

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Jie Li, Hiroaki Okamoto, Chunyue Yin, Jay Jagannathan, Jun Takizawa, Sadao Aoki, Sven Gläsker, Elisabeth J. Rushing, Alexander O. Vortmeyer, Edward H. Oldfield, Ryuya Yamanaka and Zhengping Zhuang

Object

The lack of primary lymphoid tissue within the central nervous system (CNS) confounds our understanding of the pathogenesis of primary CNS lymphomas (PCNSLs). Comparing the protein expression of PCNSLs and sporadic systemic lymphomas (SSLs) provides a useful strategy for identifying a molecular signature that characterizes disease-associated features and provides information regarding tumor initiation and progression.

Methods

Seven diffuse large B-cell PCNSLs were selected to undergo 2D gel electrophoresis, and profiled proteomes from these PCNSLs were compared with those from 7 diffuse large B-cell SSLs. Distinguishing proteins were sequenced using mass spectrometry.

Results

Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis identified an average of 706 proteins from each specimen. Computerized gel analysis and manual reconfirmation revealed a 96% similarity in the proteomes of PCNSLs and SSLs. Comparative analysis identified 9 proteins significantly overexpressed (p < 0.05) and 16 proteins downregulated in PCNSLs. The proteomic findings were further validated using Western blot and immunohistochemical staining.

Conclusions

The similarities in proteomic patterns between PCNSLs and SSLs suggest that these tumor types share structural similarities, acquired during differentiation. The ultimate fate of lymphomatous cells (CNS vs systemic) may be related to differentially expressed proteins, which function in homing and host processing. Elucidating the roles of these differentially expressed proteins will prove valuable in understanding the pathogenesis of PCNSL.

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Timothy W. A. Vogel, Alexander O. Vortmeyer, Irina A. Lubensky, Youn-Soo Lee, Makoto Furuta, Barbara Ikejiri, H. Jeffrey Kim, Russell R. Lonser, Edward H. Oldfield and Zhengping Zhuang

Object. Von Hippel—Lindau (VHL) disease is characterized by multiple tumors in specific organs. The cell of origin and the reason for the particular organ distribution of the tumors remains unknown. Endolymphatic sac tumor (ELST) is one of the lesions associated with VHL disease. Data from previous studies of VHL disease—associated hemangioblastomas (HBs) and renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) have indicated that VHL gene deficiency causes coexpression of erythropoietin (Epo) and its receptor (Epo-R), which facilitates tumor growth.

Methods. The authors studied ELSTs from five patients with VHL germline mutations. Analysis of the five ELST samples revealed loss of the wild-type allele, consistent with Knudson's two-hit hypothesis for tumorigenesis. All five ELST specimens were characterized microscopically and by immunohistochemical analysis. Coexpression of Epo and Epo-R was found in all five tumors on immunohistochemical studies and confirmed through reverse transcription—polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis.

Conclusions. Expression of Epo appears to be a result of VHL gene deficiency, whereas the simultaneous coexpression of Epo-R may reflect a developmental mechanism of tumorigenesis. Coexpression of Epo and Epo-R in ELSTs together with the morphological and genetic similarities of these lesions with other VHL disease—associated tumors indicates that VHL disease—associated tumors in different organs share common pathogenetic pathways.

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Russell R. Lonser, Stuart Walbridge, Alexander O. Vortmeyer, Svetlana D. Pack, Tung T. Nguyen, Nitin Gogate, Jeffery J. Olson, Aytac Akbasak, R. Hunt Bobo, Thomas Goffman, Zhengping Zhuang and Edward H. Oldfield

Object. To determine the acute and long-term effects of a therapeutic dose of brain radiation in a primate model, the authors studied the clinical, laboratory, neuroimaging, molecular, and histological outcomes in rhesus monkeys that had received fractionated whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT).

Methods. Twelve 3-year-old male primates (Macaca mulatta) underwent fractionated WBRT (350 cGy for 5 days/week for 2 weeks, total dose 3500 cGy). Animals were followed clinically and with laboratory studies and serial magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. They were killed when they developed medical problems or neurological symptoms, lesions appeared on MR imaging, or at study completion. Gross, histological, and molecular analyses were then performed.

Nine (82%) of 11 animals that underwent long-term follow up (> 2.5 years) developed neurological symptoms and/or enhancing lesions on MR imaging, which were defined as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), 2.9 to 8.3 years after radiation therapy. The GBMs were categorized as either unifocal (three) or multifocal (six), and were located in the supratentorial (six), infratentorial (two), or both (one) cranial regions. Histological examination revealed distant, noncontiguous tumor invasion within the white matter of all nine animals harboring GBMs. Novel interspecies comparative genomic hybridization (three animals) uniformly showed deletions in the GBMs that corresponded to chromosome 9 in humans.

Conclusions. The high rate of GBM formation (82%) following a therapeutic dose of WBRT in nonhuman primates indicates that radioinduction of these neoplasms as a late complication of this therapy may occur more frequently than is currently recognized in human patients. The development of these tumors while monitoring the monkeys' conditions with clinical and serial MR imaging studies, and access to the tumor and the entire brain for histological and molecular analyses offers an opportunity to gather unique insights into the nature and development of GBMs.

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Robert J. Weil, Alexander O. Vortmeyer, Zhengping Zhuang, Svetlana D. Pack, Nicholas Theodore, Robert K. Erickson and Edward H. Oldfield

✓ Hemangioblastomas of the central nervous system (CNS) may occur sporadically or in association with von Hippel—Lindau (VHL) syndrome. The authors present four patients with no family history or clinical evidence of VHL syndrome in whom extensive, progressive, en plaque coating of the brainstem and spinal cord with hemangioblastomas developed 1 to 8 years after complete resection of a solitary cerebellar hemangioblastoma.

Analysis included detailed physical, biochemical, radiological, and pathological examinations in all four patients, combined with family pedigree analysis. In addition, a detailed investigation of the VHL gene was undertaken. Allelic loss, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), single-stranded conformational polymorphism screening, CpG island methylation status, and X chromosome inactivation clonality analyses were performed. Although there was no evidence of germline alterations in the VHL gene on clinical and radiological examination or in the family history (all four patients) or analysis of peripheral blood (three patients), somatic deletion of one copy of the VHL gene occurred in these tumors. These findings indicate that the multiple, separate deposits of tumors were likely derived from a single clone. Results of CGH indicate that one or several additional genes are probably involved in the malignant behavior of the hemangioblastomas in these patients. Furthermore, the malignant biological and clinical behavior of these tumors, in which multiple sites of subarachnoid dissemination developed 1 to 8 years after initial complete resection, followed by progressive tumor growth and death of the patients, occurred despite a histological appearance typical of benign hemangioblastomas.

Malignant hemangioblastomatosis developed 1 to 8 years after resection of an isolated cerebellar hemangioblastoma. Alterations of the VHL gene may be permissive in this setting, but other genes are likely to be the source of the novel biological and clinical presentation of the disseminated hemangioblastomas in these patients. This appears to represent a novel condition in which the product of one or more mutations in several genes permits malignant tumor behavior despite retention of a benign histological picture, a circumstance previously not recognized in CNS tumors.

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Lance S. Governale, Alexander O. Vortmeyer, Zhengping Zhuang and Edward H. Oldfield

✓ Meningioma has been included in the constellation of tumors associated with von Hippel—Lindau (VHL) disease in previously published reports. It is unclear whether these tumors are an uncommon component of VHL disease or are more readily detected in these patients because of the frequency with which they undergo central nervous system imaging as part of the routine management of VHL disease. The authors report the case of a patient with VHL disease in whom a progressively enlarging supratentorial mass developed and was diagnosed as a hemangioblastoma because of its appearance on serial magnetic resonance images. At surgery the tumor displayed the typical features of a meningioma and was given the histological diagnosis of fibrous meningioma. Single-stranded conformational polymorphism analysis of the tumor DNA revealed a loss of heterozygosity at the neurofibromatosis Type 2 gene locus, known to be associated with sporadically occurring meningiomas. Despite this finding, the VHL gene locus on the allele from the patient's unaffected parent was normal. Thus it is unlikely that the occurrence of this patient's fibrous meningioma was associated with underlying VHL disease. Given the high frequency of neuroimaging sessions in patients with VHL disease, some supratentorial lesions that have been given radiological diagnoses of hemangioblastomas may be incidental meningiomas.

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Robert J. Weil, Zhengping Zhuang, Svetlana Pack, Shimareet Kumar, Lee Helman, Brian G. Fuller, Crystall L. Mackall and Edward H. Oldfield

✓ Molecular biological techniques have begun to transform modern medicine. These techniques have shown promise in the pathological diagnosis of difficult or uncommon tumors. Accurate molecular diagnosis of the small round-cell tumors, for example, is especially important because divergent therapies may be required to eradicate such disparate lesions as neuroblastoma, lymphoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, central primitive neuroectodermal tumors/medulloblastoma, or Ewing sarcoma (ES). The authors present an unusual case of a primary, extraosseous ES arising from the intramedullary spinal cord, in which molecular studies were required for specific diagnosis and therapeutic guidance.