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Leonardo Rangel-Castilla, Fangxiang Chen, Lawrence Choi, Justin C. Clark and Peter Nakaji

Object

An optimal entry point and trajectory for endoscopic colloid cyst (ECC) resection helps to protect important neurovascular structures. There is a large discrepancy in the entry point and trajectory in the neuroendoscopic literature.

Methods

Trajectory views from MRI or CT scans used for cranial image guidance in 39 patients who had undergone ECC resection between July 2004 and July 2010 were retrospectively evaluated. A target point of the colloid cyst was extended out to the scalp through a trajectory carefully observed in a 3D model to ensure that important anatomical structures were not violated. The relation of the entry point to the midline and coronal sutures was established. Entry point and trajectory were correlated with the ventricular size.

Results

The optimal entry point was situated 42.3 ± 11.7 mm away from the sagittal suture, ranging from 19.1 to 66.9 mm (median 41.4 mm) and 46.9 ± 5.7 mm anterior to the coronal suture, ranging from 36.4 to 60.5 mm (median 45.9 mm). The distance from the entry point to the target on the colloid cyst varied from 56.5 to 78.0 mm, with a mean value of 67.9 ± 4.8 mm (median 68.5 mm). Approximately 90% of the optimal entry points are located 40–60 mm in front of the coronal suture, whereas their perpendicular distance from the midline ranges from 19.1 to 66.9 mm. The location of the “ideal” entry points changes laterally from the midline as the ventricles change in size.

Conclusions

The results suggest that the optimal entry for ECC excision be located at 42.3 ± 11.7 mm perpendicular to the midline, and 46.9 ± 5.7 mm anterior to the coronal suture, but also that this point differs with the size of the ventricles. Intraoperative stereotactic navigation should be considered for all ECC procedures whenever it is available. The entry point should be estimated from the patient's own preoperative imaging studies if intraoperative neuronavigation is not available. An estimated entry point of 4 cm perpendicular to the midline and 4.5 cm anterior to the coronal suture is an acceptable alternative that can be used in patients with ventriculomegaly.

Free access

Leonardo Rangel-Castilla, Jonathan J. Russin, Hasan A. Zaidi, Eduardo Martinez-del-Campo, Min S. Park, Felipe C. Albuquerque, Cameron G. McDougall, Peter Nakaji and Robert F. Spetzler

Object

Spinal arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare, complex spinal vascular lesions that are challenging to manage. Recently, understanding of these lesions has increased thanks to neuroimaging technology. Published reports of surgical results and clinical outcome are limited to small series. The authors present a large contemporary series of patients with spinal AVFs and AVMs who were treated at Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix, Arizona.

Methods

Retrospective detailed review of a prospective vascular database was performed for all patients with spinal AVFs and AVMs treated between 2000 and 2013. Patient demographic data, AVF and AVM characteristics, surgical results, clinical outcomes, complications, and long-term follow-up were reviewed.

Results

Between 2000 and 2013, 110 patients (57 male and 53 female) underwent obliteration of spinal AVFs and AVMs. The mean age at presentation was 42.3 years (range 18 months–81 years). There were 44 patients with AVFs and 66 with AVMs. The AVM group included 27 intramedullary, 21 conus medullaris, 12 metameric, and 6 extradural. The most common location was thoracic spine (61%), followed by cervical (22.7%), lumbar (14.5%), and sacral (1.8%). The most common presenting signs and symptoms included paresis/paralysis (75.5%), paresthesias (60%), pain (51.8%), bowel/bladder dysfunction (41.8%), and myelopathy (36.4%). Evidence of rupture was seen in 26.4% of patients. Perioperative embolization was performed in 42% of patients. Resection was performed in 95 patients (86.4%). Embolization alone was the only treatment in 14 patients (12.7%). One patient was treated with radiosurgery alone. Angiographically verified AVF and AVM obliteration was achieved in 92 patients (83.6%). At a mean follow-up duration of 30.5 months (range 1–205 months), 43 patients (97.7%) with AVFs and 57 (86.4%) with AVMs remained functionally independent (McCormick Scale scores ≤ 2). Perioperative complications were seen in 8 patients (7%). No deaths occurred. Temporary neurological deficits were observed in 27 patients (24.5%). These temporary deficits recovered 6–8 weeks after treatment. Recurrence was identified in 6 patients (13.6%) with AVFs and 10 (15.2%) with AVMs.

Conclusions

Spinal AVFs and AVMs are complex lesions that should be considered for surgical obliteration. Over the last several decades the authors have changed surgical strategies and management to achieve better clinical outcomes. Transient neurological deficit postoperatively is a risk associated with intervention; however, clinical outcomes appear to exceed the natural history based on patients’ ability to recover during the follow-up period. Due to the recurrence rate associated with these lesions, long-term follow-up is required.

Free access

Leonardo Rangel-Castilla, Jonathan J. Russin, Eduardo Martinez-del-Campo, Hector Soriano-Baron, Robert F. Spetzler and Peter Nakaji

Object

Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are classically described as congenital static lesions. However, in addition to rupturing, AVMs can undergo growth, remodeling, and regression. These phenomena are directly related to cellular, molecular, and physiological processes. Understanding these relationships is essential to direct future diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The authors performed a search of the contemporary literature to review current information regarding the molecular and cellular biology of AVMs and how this biology will impact their potential future management.

Methods

A PubMed search was performed using the key words “genetic,” “molecular,” “brain,” “cerebral,” “arteriovenous,” “malformation,” “rupture,” “management,” “embolization,” and “radiosurgery.” Only English-language papers were considered. The reference lists of all papers selected for full-text assessment were reviewed.

Results

Current concepts in genetic polymorphisms, growth factors, angiopoietins, apoptosis, endothelial cells, pathophysiology, clinical syndromes, medical treatment (including tetracycline and microRNA-18a), radiation therapy, endovascular embolization, and surgical treatment as they apply to AVMs are discussed.

Conclusions

Understanding the complex cellular biology, physiology, hemodynamics, and flow-related phenomena of AVMs is critical for defining and predicting their behavior, developing novel drug treatments, and improving endovascular and surgical therapies.